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The Mishnah in Tractate Megillah, Chapter 4, discusses the laws concerning "Holy Scrolls" which are read during Shabbat and the holidays. It is presumed that the "Holy Scrolls" were written in Hebrew. This tradition of reading the Torah in Hebrew likely goes back to the prophet Ezra, and may extend even further than this. So it is unlikely that a Jewish ...


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Yes, this is called the Septuagint, "the book of the seventy". This text is still in existence. Jewish tradition is that there was a desire for a translation of the Torah into the vernacular of the time. That was the Alexandrian dialect of Greek. Following Alexander the Great in the 4th century BCE, Greek was spoken all across the Mediterranean and western ...


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There is a Ben Yehoyada in כתובות דף ח ע׳ב who points out that Chazzal made a distinction between נבול פה, and כל המנבל פיו. The first refers to speaking perverse language, the second refers to making perverse gestures with one's tongue.


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Actually, it seems that the spoken language of the time was Aramaic. Even in the Mishna, written while the Jewish people were still in Israel, often when document are quoted, it is usually in Aramaic. Consider, for example, Megillas Taanis, which was written as a calendar of sorts for the nation at large, written by early Tannaim (Shabbos 13a) and ...


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"Bal" is used in Hebrew. You say the word "bal" at least 3 times weekly in the davening: אף תכון תבל בל תמוט from Tehillim 93:1 The word means "lest". It probably has a better usage than the term "al" or "Lo" used before negative mitzvoth, as in the Torah context, the commandment is in the "active" voice - "Don't do ...". When speaking about the ...



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