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16

Shulchan Aruch, Orach Chayim, 493:2, Rema: ואין להסתפר עד ל"ג בעצמו ולא מבערב. מיהו אם חל ביום ראשון, נוהגין להסתפר ביום ששי לכבוד שבת And it is not permitted to get a haircut [or shave] until the day of the Lag b'Omer itself. However, if it [Lag b'Omer] falls on Sunday, we have a custom to get haircuts [and shave] on Friday, in honor ...


10

In the Hagada Shel Pesach Gevuras Akiva he explains that the Rama is the one who holds that you should say Baomer, and Lag Baomer is the Yarzeit of the Rama. therefore in honor of the Rama everyone calls the day Lag Baomer.


9

The Beit Yosef there quotes many Rishonim who have a version of the story (Yevamot 62b) that Rabbi Akiva's students died until פרוס העצרת a half [month] before Shavuot. So 49-15=34 and on the last day we say that a partial day counts as the whole day so on the 34th in the morning, the mourning ends.


9

The Lubavitcher Rebbe zt"l writes that there were halachic and kabbalistic reasons to switch from בעומר to לעומר in the counting (as discussed in the commentaries to Shulchan Aruch, Orach Chaim 489:1). However, there was no real need to be so particular about dates and the like, so the older form was retained there. (This is similar to what Curiouser wrote ...


7

The Mishna Berura (489 sk 22) posits that if you don't say the number of weeks (on a night where there are weeks to count) in response to a friend then you may continue to count with a bracha later that night. This is a combination of a number of considerations. First, there is a machloket if the weeks count is an absolute requirement (l'ikuva) on every ...


7

Despite it's apparent similarity to pagan practices dating back thousands of years, this custom exists in some communities (particularly among Lubavitchers and some other Chassidic groups) and dates back at least several decades. Similar customs (such as eating colored eggs on Purim) existed in Jewish communities in Afghanistan and Yemen, and women in ...


6

Certainly for those of a Hassidic or Kabbalistic bent, observing Lag BaOmer tied to R' Shimon Bar Yochai's death is a big deal. For a more critical (Mitnagdic?) view, try this lecture from Rabbi Dr. Shnayer Leiman on the subject. He, like the Chasam Sofer before him, reflect the non-Hassidic view of being unsure about where the whole thing came from. ...


5

From Halachically Speaking, Volume 3 Issue 16: Some poskim say one who has not yet counted the sefira of Lag B’omer should avoid telling someone else today is Lag B’omer, since doing so may be considered counting the day.78 Other poskim permit this since his intention is not to count the day, rather he is referring to the name of the day since it is ...


5

Footnote 61 of Halachically Speaking Volume 7, Issue 5 (PDF) says: Chok Yaakov 7, Shulchan Aruch Harav 5, Chayei Adom 131:11, Mishnah Berurah 5, Aruch Hashulchan 6, L’Torah V’horah 2: page 19:2 quoting the opinion of Harav Moshe Feinstein, zt’l, Rivevos Ephraim 6: page 294:2, Orchos Rabbeinu 2: page 95:11, see Chok Yaakov 7. This is even according to the ...


5

See Halachically Speaking Volume 3 Issue 16 page 5: When Lag B’omer falls out on Sunday (as it does this year) shaving etc. is permitted on Friday because of kovod for Shabbos. The reason why it is kovod for Shabbos is because by the mincha before Lag B’omer one does not say tachnun, so technically shaving would permitted on Shabbos, but since one can ...


5

See Moishe Dovid Lebovits, "Lag B'Omer," 5 Towns Jewish Times: Night or Day. Many have the custom to make the bonfires (and dancing) on the night of Lag B’omer. Others say that the simcha should start at day.85 However, it seems that the minhag is to conduct the bonfire and dancing at night all over the world, not only in Meron.86 ...


5

The Simcha of Lag Baomer is a strange concept. The Shulchan Aruch says that on the day a Tzaddik dies you make a fast. Where did this day of happiness come from? The GR"A says it was the day that the students of Rabbi Akiva stopped dying. However, the question still stands. Rabbi Shimon Bar Yochai died on this day, so what is the celebration about? The ...


4

The "simcha" of R. Shimon bar Yochi on Lag b'Omer is that he began his studies with R. Akiva. After the plague of R. Akiva's students ended, R. Shimon bar Yochi was one of the 5 students who formed the new generation of students to continue learning under R. Akiva. (This accords with the manuscripts which say not that "he died" on Lag b'Omer but that it was ...


4

From Halachically Speaking Volume 3 Issue 16, see there for sources, as well as other customs associated with Lag B'omer: What Happened on Lag B’omer Many different happenings took place on Lag B’omer. Some say it is the day Rav Shimon Bar Yochai came out of the cave that he and his son were in for thirteen years. Rav Shimon Bar Yochai died on ...


3

According to this essay by Rabbi Yossi Jacobson: Before his passing, Rabbi Shimon instructed his disciples to observe his yahrzeit (the day of his death) as a time of joy and festivity The sources for this: See Zohar vol. 3 p. 287b; p. 291a. Pri Aitz Chaim Shaar Sefiras Haomer chapter 7; Shaar Hakavanos Sefiras Haomer Derush # 12. Mishnas Chassidim ...


3

The bonfires, sources of tremendous brightness, remind us that Lag BaOmer is celebrated as the yahrzeit of R' Shimon bar Yohai, the author of the Zohar (which can be translated as 'brightness').


2

Eliezer Brodt claims here that the death aspect of it is all based on a misprint: Rabi Shim'on bar Yochai wasn't dead. He was happy!


2

This is discussed at http://hirhurim.blogspot.com/2010/04/lag-baomer-bows-arrows.html


2

Many Sephardic rabbis and works (e.g. Yalkut Yosef) do indeed call it "Lag La'omer."


2

בליל ל''ג בעומר ולמחרתו נוהגים להקל לשמוע שירים מכלי נגינה, וכל שכן מטייפ, לכבוד ההילולא של התנא רשב''י ע''ה.‏ [חזון עובדיה על יום טוב מהדורת תשס''ג, עמוד רנח] According to Maran Hacham Ovadia Shelit"a it is Mutar.


1

As brought here, the two opinions are the Mechaber and the Ramo. The Mechaber holds that the proper time to morn the students of Rabbi Akiva is when it happened, whereas the Ramo holds that it should be on the days that Tachnurn is not said. The Arizal holds that the issue on Sefira is that they are days of judgement, which is why the students died then, so ...


1

The answer to your first issue/question quickly is no, you wouldn't need to worry. My answer expands on your question, hopefully answering questions other people who visit this site may have. Assuming one flies from New York to the Far East (during the Omer period), such that he loses a day. Lets consider the example of a person who takes a Monday night ...



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