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10

The Midrash Tanchuma (Vayikra 1:7) asks your question: ולמה קריבין קרבן מן העוף ומן הכבשים ומן הצאן ומן העזים ולא מן הדגים, שנאמר, [ו] אם מן העוף עולה קרבנו, אלא בשביל שהם בשר ודם כמו האדם ויוצאין מבטן אמן כמו האדם, מכפרים על האדם. אבל הדגים, ביצים הם ויוצאין מהן וחיין. And why do we offer up sacrifices from birds, sheep and goats but not from fish? ...


7

This is a classic ruba d'leisa kaman. In the overall population, a very, very small number of animals are prohibited. Knowing nothing else, presented with an animal before us, we assume it is permitted. (This is known as "leisa kaman", "it does not appear before us", as the negative outcome is a theoretical. A weaker form of rov is "ruba d'isa kaman", "a ...


7

The extra blood after each sacrifice was poured at the base of the altar (if it was considered Shirayim, leftover) or the Amah - a channel which led out of the courtyard (if the blood's status is dichuy, invalid to be poured on the base). This is from the Talmud, Zevachim 34b. The leftover blood which was poured out flowed to Nachal Kidron, and was redeemed ...


6

In Rosh Hashanah 10a defines Par, פר, it's at least 2 years old and one day. In Bava Kamma 65b Rava says that a Shor, שור, can even be a newborn. A Shor can do damage at any age and be liable, but the Korban needs to be a certain age.


6

While this isn't exactly what you're looking for, it's close: the Rama's Toras Ha'Olah, which does go through just about every mitzvah/halakha in Seder Kodshim and explains the reasoning for their details in a super-cool-scientific-mystical way. It's not an encyclopedia in that it isn't in alphabetical order, but it is ordered systematically, by topic. ...


6

As Clint already mentioned, the obligation to bring doves applies to a Zava - one who bleeds between the expected times of her period (to oversimplify). So most women never had this obligation. Another missing piece is that the woman does not have to bring the doves immediately - she can accumulate the obligations and bring them all together. As long as ...


5

I once asked this question. The part about the korban offering only refers to more unusual zaavaah flow rather than the typical niddah flow. I, like you have done now, once understood the last paragraph about the korban to pertain to both of the previous two paragraphs about niddah and zaavah rather than just the penultimate zaavah paragraph.


5

The Mishna in Pesachim (6:6) discusses slaughtering a Korban Pesach on Shabbat and finding it to be a Tereifa. In the Rambam's ruling (Shegagot 2:10 (English)): וכן השוחט את הפסח ביום ארבעה עשר שחל להיות בשבת, ונודע לו אחר כן שמשכו הבעלים את ידיהם או מתו או נטמאו קודם שחיטה, או שנמצא טריפה בסתר, כגון ניקוב מעיים או ריאה--הרי זה פטור, מפני ששחט ברשות; אבל ...


4

In Shemos 5:3, Moshe introduces his request: נלכה נא דרך שלשת ימים במידבר ונזבחה ליהוה Now let us go on a three day journey in the desert and sacrifice to the Lord our God


4

R' Samson Raphael Hirsh's Commentary on some of the verses you cite provides extensive treatments of particular lessons to be derived from each kind of blood-sprinking or -pouring, starting with seven pages on the one introduced in Vayikra 1:5. My understanding, after looking through some of these for general ideas about the meaning of blood-sprinkling, is ...


4

Rashi (ibid) clearly distinguishes between the whitening of sin and the commandment of the goat. This strongly implies that while the two may be correlated, they are ultimately independent and one does not necessarily cause the other. In other words, The whitening of sin was not necessarily always the direct result of the goat's death. Likewise, the ...


3

The Korban does need to be brought on an altar (Rambam Maaseh Korbanot 19:1). This altar though does not have the requirements of horns, a ramp, a base, and square corners which regular altars (including a Bamah Gedolah, though that isn't the case here (Megilla 9b)) have (Zevachim 108b). I don't see any other listed exclusions, so presumably other ...


3

The Ramban (Numbers 6:14) writes that the Nazir is sinning by leaving his elevated state, i.e. the sacrifice is for ending the state of being a Nazir. על דרך הפשט, כי האיש הזה חוטא נפשו במלאת הנזירות, כי הוא עתה נזור מקדושתו ועבודת השם, וראוי היה לו שיזיר לעולם ויעמוד כל ימיו נזיר וקדוש לאלקיו The Rambam sees in the Nazir support for his approach that ...


3

Look further the gemara: בראשונה היו קושרין לשון של זהורית על פתח אולם מבפנים וכיון שהגיע שעיר למדבר היה מלבין וידעו שנעשית מצותו Originally they used to tie the thread of crimson wool to the entrance of the Ulam within, and as soon as the he-goat reached the wilderness, it turned white. Then they knew that the commandment concerning it had ...


3

I don't know if he had a source, but a Rebbe of mine - Rav Yitzchok Fruchter of Jerusalem - explained this concept at various times. There are three types of invalid korban that someone who eats gets kares: a korban that was prepared with intent to eat it beyond the specified time, a korban when eaten beyond the specified time, and a korban eaten by ...


2

I heard a recording in which R' Yosef Veiner attributed this to the general approach of the Moreh Nevochim not being meant as anything other than palatable answers for those who were "straying." However, that entire approach to the Moreh is very tenuous, ואין כאן מקום להאריך. R' Yaakov Kaminetzky in Emes L'Yaakov on Chumash, Vayikra 1:9, resolves a ...


2

In English, when we say "ox" we mean a male bovus that was bred and trained for use as a work animal; in general society they were usually also castrated, but the Torah clearly forbade this. When we say "bull" we mean a male bovus bred for its meat, or to sire more offspring. (Further proof that the oxen in the Torah weren't castrated: the letter aleph ...


2

The 17th blessing reads as follows: רצה השם אלקינו בעמך ישראל ובתפילתם והשב את העבודה לדביר ביתך ואישי ישראל ותפילתם באהבה תקבל ברצון ותהי לרצון תמיד עבודת ישראל עמך... ותחזינה עינינו בשובך לציון ברחמים ברוך אתה השם המחזיר שכינתו לציון:‏ Favor, God our Lord your nation Israel and their prayers, and return the service to the sanctum of your ...


2

The Ramban says the reason why their are no chicken Korbanos is because chickens are promiscuous. Seemingly, the same answer would apply to fish who mate frequently. (See also Kli Yakar, Parshas Behaloscha on Basar)


2

With very few exceptions, sacrifices are for inadvertent violations which can include violations which would have had a death penalty had it been on purpose and with witnesses and warning - for example a Shabbos violation. If the person forgot what day it was, or forgot that the specific activity was forbidden, they would have to bring a sacrifice. (Rambam ...


2

Very good question! Answer is my own thinking, here... The wording in the Musaf paragraph has the word כמדובר - "as it is said". This means, that the measurements are specifically said in the same place that the sacrifice of that day is mentioned in the Torah, specifically, in parshat Pinchas Bamidbar 29:1-39. The only times the specific measurements for ...


1

I point to the Bracha in Shemoneh Esrei, "Retzei," which now focuses on the return of the sacrifices, but when the Beit HaMikdrash is rebuilt we will pray that the sacrifices are accepted and pleasing to God. You can also see from the Ma'amadot that representatives of the non-Levites were sent to the Beit HaMikdash to pray that the sacrifices be accepted, ...


1

The Mishna Berura in 1:17 is referring to the next S'if Katan (1:7) in the Shulchan Aruch. כְּשֶׁיְּסַיֵּם פָּרָשַׁת הָעוֹלָה יֹאמַר: יְהִי רָצוֹן מִלְּפָנֶיךָ שֶׁיְּהֵא זֶה חָשׁוּב וּמְקֻבָּל כְּאִלּוּ הִקְרַבְתִּי עוֹלָה, וְכָךְ יֹאמַר אַחַר פ' הַמִּנְחָה וְהַשְּׁלָמִים מִפְּנֵי שֶׁהֵם בָּאִים (יג) בִּנְדָבָה. This can be corobarated by looking at ...


1

I think that there are two general approached to why the Nazir brings a chatas upon completion of his nezirus: One opinion in the Gemara (Taanis 11a), R. Elazar Hakapr, does state that the nazir is regarded as a sinner and brings a sacrifice to atone for his sin. The gemara states that the nazir's sin is that 'he abstained from wine', an opinion taken up ...


1

Wikipedia seems to have done a good job (my emphasis) Attitudes toward Nazirites The nazirite is called "holy unto the Lord" (Numbers 6:8), but at the same time must bring a sin-offering (Numbers 6:11) and his sins are explicitly referred to ("and make atonement for that which he sinned"). This apparent contradiction, pointed out in the ...


1

This is documented in the Rambam - Hilchot Teshuva, 1st chapter. In summary: The שעיר המשתלח - goat that was sent to Azazel atones on all sins if Teshuva was done. Else it only atones on "light" sins. "Serious sins" being defined as those for which one could get killed by Bet Din, or one deserves Karet, as well as false or unnecessary oaths. Everything ...


1

Probably the same standards used in Arachim (see 3rd Perek) and codified by the Rambam in הלכות ערכים וחרמים פרק ג In a nutshell, we pay up his debts (as they have an earlier lien) and then we provide him with food for 30 days. He gets basic living conditions (roof, bed, Tefilin and weekday clothes) and a basic set of tools for his trade. We then sell his ...


1

M'Zahav U'Mipaz page 415 brings in the name of Rabbi Yosef Ades Zatzal that the location is what is currently known as Shaar Mandelbaum in the direction of the grave of Shimon HaTzadik



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