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17

Moses makes it clear that when the Jews enter the Promised Land, eventually one special place shall be chosen, and that will be the only place that animal sacrifices are authorized. That place is the Temple in Jerusalem. Today the Temple does not stand; it's unclear exactly where on the Temple Mount area the altar stood; there are numerous uncertainties ...


15

See Tosfos "me'alyah", Pesachim 3b, where it says most were sheep. Background: A non-Jew came and told R' Yehuda ben Beseirah that he routinely goes to Jerusalem to eat from the Korban Pesach (which is forbidden to non-Jews). R' Yehuda wasn't going to Jerusalem himself, and so couldn't notify the Jews there. So he came up with a plan for the non-Jew to get ...


11

The Torah made it very clear (Deuteronomy 12:5-18) that once the Jews would reach "the rest and inheritance ...the place G-d will choose" (i.e. the Temple in Jerusalem), that would be the place for sacrificial service. The Second Temple was destroyed by the Romans around the year 70, and thus there haven't been sacrifices since. Thus, many of the roles of ...


10

It's not a contradiction. The second part is a clause which comes in to effect should the first law be violated. It's like the Rambam says: You're not allowed to substitute an animal for one which has already been consecrated. If you do, the original animal is consecrated, and the animal which was substituted is also regarded as consecrated. As the ...


10

Bamidbar 15:14 says that a convert must bring an offering "throughout your generations". Sifre Zuta says that the inclusion of this phrase teaches that converts are accepted at any time. Haamek Davar states that the convert or their descendant must bring an offering when the Temple is rebuilt.


10

The sefer שער בת רבים brings from the Alshich and the Abarbanel that the reason that Yitzchok only asked about the wood and the fire was because he was asking a very clever question which would force Avraham to tell him the truth: He asked: Behold, you brought fire and wood from home even though these are things which you can get anywhere, even in the ...


10

The Midrash Tanchuma (Vayikra 1:7) asks your question: ולמה קריבין קרבן מן העוף ומן הכבשים ומן הצאן ומן העזים ולא מן הדגים, שנאמר, [ו] אם מן העוף עולה קרבנו, אלא בשביל שהם בשר ודם כמו האדם ויוצאין מבטן אמן כמו האדם, מכפרים על האדם. אבל הדגים, ביצים הם ויוצאין מהן וחיין. And why do we offer up sacrifices from birds, sheep and goats but not from fish? ...


7

As mentioned in other answers, we don't offer sacrifices these days because once the Beit Hamikdash was established as the permanent House of G-d we are no longer allowed to offer Korbanot anywhere else. Although the Rambam holds that we do not need the Temple to be standing in order to offer Korbanot, the Korbanot still must be offerred on the Temple Mount. ...


7

The minimum of an average person had to go to the Bais Hamikdash for the 3 Regolim and that meant a Korban Olas Re'iya and a Chagiga. In addition, on Erev Pesach they had to bring a Korban Pesach (which was brought in groups as opposed to the individual). As far as how often a person would have to go to the Mikdash, even if a person is obligated to bring a ...


7

The Mishna (Zevachim 3:1) states: כל הפסולין ששחטו שחיטתן כשרה שהשחיטה כשרה בזרים בנשים ובעבדים ובטמאים אפילו בקדשי קדשים Anyone who is invalid for Temple service who slaughtered [a sacrifice], the slaughter is valid, for slaughtering [sacrifices] is valid even for non-priests, women, slaves and even impure people, even for the holiest of sacrifices. ...


7

The extra blood after each sacrifice was poured at the base of the altar (if it was considered Shirayim, leftover) or the Amah - a channel which led out of the courtyard (if the blood's status is dichuy, invalid to be poured on the base). This is from the Talmud, Zevachim 34b. The leftover blood which was poured out flowed to Nachal Kidron, and was redeemed ...


7

This is a classic ruba d'leisa kaman. In the overall population, a very, very small number of animals are prohibited. Knowing nothing else, presented with an animal before us, we assume it is permitted. (This is known as "leisa kaman", "it does not appear before us", as the negative outcome is a theoretical. A weaker form of rov is "ruba d'isa kaman", "a ...


6

A lot of ink has been spilled on this topic. Kaftor Vaferach (ch. 6) reports that Rabbeinu Yechiel of Paris (who immigrated to the Land of Israel, with his students, sometime in the 1250s) proposed in 5017 (1257) to go to Jerusalem and offer korbanos, and mentions the concerns about tum'ah (which he goes on to dismiss, since public korbanos override it) and ...


6

Rambam (in the introduction to his Commentary on the Mishnah) says that it is because the Torah itself introduces the concept of slaughtering for nonsacred purposes immediately following the rules about sacrifices (Deut. 12:11, 15). It may also be due to the fact that kosher slaughter is basically an optional mitzvah (you don't have to eat meat), except in ...


6

Mishnah Kinnim 2:6: אין מביאין תורין כנגד בני יונה, ולא בני יונה כנגד תורין. כיצד: האישה שהביאה חטאתה תור, ועולתה בן יונה--תכפול, ותביא עולתה תור. עולתה תור, וחטאתה בן יונה--תכפול, ותביא עולתה בן יונה. בן עזאי אומר, הולכין אחר ראשון


6

Quoth Rabbi Kornfield (from http://www.shemayisrael.com/parsha/kornfeld/archives/vayikra58.htm): Although this practice may seem bizarre to the uninitiated, the early commentaries point out the profound and enduring effect that offering a sacrifice has on a sinner. Man, like animal, is a physical organism of flesh and blood. Both are driven by their ...


6

The Taz (OC 473:4) suggests the reason is so that we can eat it, because it is forbidden to eat roasted meat on the Seder night. The Mishna Berura (:23) quotes two other reasons. First, that we use an egg, which is commonly served at a meal to mourners, to represent our mourning the loss of the Beit HaMikdash and the Korbanot. Second, the word for egg in ...


6

This question is related to another and I believe the answers are the same. The sugya (discussion) is found in Talmud Bavli, Krisus 8b-9a. The resolution there is essentially that the korban (offering) is not m'akev (does not invalidate the conversion), which is learned from a gzeiras hakasuv (exegetical interpretation of a verse).


6

In his book "The Temple" Joshua Berman deals with this question around page 13-17. Shabbat and the Temple/Mishkan are directly interconnected with each other. While we do things which are not allowed on Shabbat outside of the Temple, the construction of the Temple itself can not be done on Shabbat. One of the purposes of Shabbat is the Temple, and one ...


6

Although the question originally conflated a zavah with woman who is niddah, this obligation applies to a woman who is experiencing discharge beyond her regular menstrual cycle. Regarding the offering brought by a Zav, the male counterpart of a Zavah, the Ibn Ezra on Lev. 15:15 explains that an offering is brought because such discharges are divine ...


6

In Rosh Hashanah 10a defines Par, פר, it's at least 2 years old and one day. In Bava Kamma 65b Rava says that a Shor, שור, can even be a newborn. A Shor can do damage at any age and be liable, but the Korban needs to be a certain age.


6

As Clint already mentioned, the obligation to bring doves applies to a Zava - one who bleeds between the expected times of her period (to oversimplify). So most women never had this obligation. Another missing piece is that the woman does not have to bring the doves immediately - she can accumulate the obligations and bring them all together. As long as ...


5

Not sure I quite understand your question, but here goes: 1.) The traditional Jewish forms of Temple worship (bowing, incense, animal sacrifice, wine libation) are prohibited vis-a-vis an idol, regardless of whether that's the normal way of worshiping it. "Serving deities in the manner they are conventionally served" prohibits other forms of worship. 2.) ...


5

The Rambam (Hil. Pesulei Hamukdashin 4:1, from Temurah 15b ff) points out that this is a law given to Moshe (ודברים אלו כולם מפי משה רבנו נשמעו). He may be stressing that point in order to explain how indeed the rules for treating such animals can override the rule about avoiding tzaar baalei chaim. [It's actually a matter of dispute as to whether the ...


5

There is a dispute in Beitzah 20b whether voluntary offerings can be brought on Yom Tov, but the final halachah is that they cannot; the only private korbanos that can be brought on that day are the ones in which one is obligated for Yom Tov - the olas re'iyah, shalmei chagigah and shalmei simchah (Rambam, Hil. Chagigah 1:8). [The mishnah you quoted means ...


5

The Shulchan Aruch Harav says that one eats eggs to remind him to mourn the Beis Hamikdash, since had the Beis Hamikdash stood, we would have been eating the korban Pesach.


5

There are 4 basic categories of animals that are used in Sacrifices. Cows Goats Sheep Birds Goats were used for sacrifices anytime that there is a "Kaparah" or "atonement" related to the sacrifice. I.e. if the purpose of the sacrifice is to correct some wrong, then a goat is used. Sheep are used for any sacrifices where the focus is on either the ...


5

According to R' Samson Raphael Hirsch, in various places in his commentary on the Torah, the ox, typically used for plowing fields, represents humans' power to do effect change in the world. Thus, any time we sacrifice an ox on God's altar, we're dedicating that power within ourselves to His service. The first time he brings this up in his commentary is on ...


5

The child of a Shelamim is offered as a Shelamim according to the Chachamim, while R Eliezer prohibits doing so. All further descendants of a Shelamim's child are not offered. All descendants of a Todah are offered as Todot but without bread. All descendants of a Bechor or a Maaser are treated as a Bechor or Maaser. All descendants of a Chattat must die. ...


5

The Mishna in Pesachim (6:6) discusses slaughtering a Korban Pesach on Shabbat and finding it to be a Tereifa. In the Rambam's ruling (Shegagot 2:10 (English)): וכן השוחט את הפסח ביום ארבעה עשר שחל להיות בשבת, ונודע לו אחר כן שמשכו הבעלים את ידיהם או מתו או נטמאו קודם שחיטה, או שנמצא טריפה בסתר, כגון ניקוב מעיים או ריאה--הרי זה פטור, מפני ששחט ברשות; אבל ...



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