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Rav Hirsch strikes again! On the second verse you quoted (Ex. 28:38), he writes, as part of a much larger discussion on the ציץ: ...The כהן גדול (High Priest [who wears the ציץ, Showplate]) represents the whole Service of the Sanctuary, and the inscription קדש לה' (holy to God) on his forehead proclaims the Name of God, which expresses the whole ...


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Aaron shall bear the iniquity committed in the Holy Things This refers to those sins which are committed against the holy things i.e. the sin of a priest entering the Temple and/or officiating in the Divine Service while impure. See Mishnah, Menachot 3:3 and Zevachim 8:12 for more information and examples.


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Maftir is not considered one of the 7 "main" aliyot of the parsha. Technically, the entire parsha has been read and maftir is, usually, a repetition of the last few verses of the the weekly reading. When another Torah is used for maftir, it is a similar idea. The main parsha has been read, and maftor is an extra aliyah. Therefore, a Cohen may be called. This ...


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This was birkat kohanim, the priestly blessing, which (in the diaspora, at least for Ashkenazim) is done only on the high holy days and festivals. In Israel it is done at each morning service (where a minyan is present). This is a recreation of a temple practice. I have been taught that one reason our kohanim take their shoes off is because they did in ...


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There is a good article here. DO THE REMAINS OF A NON-JEW CONVEY TUMAS MEIS? The remains of a non-Jew convey tumas meis if they are touched or carried. Although all agree that the halacha is that the remains of a non-Jew convey tumah through touching and carrying, there is a dispute as to whether the remains of a non-Jew convey tumas ohel. ...


2

As Professor Joad would have said "It depends what you mean by Rabbi". Wikipeida uses the traditional meaning of Rabbi as: a teacher of Torah. This title derives from the Hebrew word רַבִּי rabi, meaning "My Master", which is the way a student would address a master of Torah. The word "master" רב rav literally means "great one". But the article ...


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I'm sure there are many weak points in this comparison, but one I can point to is this: I have known a kohen rabbi who gave eulogies. One of the main funeral homes in his neighborhood had a special room for kohanim that was tum-a-isolated from the main funeral room, but visible in both directions via large windows and audible in both directions via ...



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