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10

Per the Star-K and CRC-Chicago it is not Kitniyos Kosher for Passover Status: Quinoa was determined to be Kosher L'Pesach. It is not related to the chameishes minei dagan-five types of grain products, nor to millet or rice. Quinoa is a member of the "goose foot" family, which includes sugar beets and beet root. The Star-K tested quinoa to ...


8

The Jews of Bagdad and Morocco stayed away from rice because they were afraid that it was mixed with wheat. See Ben Ish Chai Tzav 41 , Rav Pe’alim 3:30


7

Those that cited OC 453 are correct: the Mishna Berura in Se'if Katan 8 states clearly that if rice was found in soup, just throw out the rice, and you may eat the soup. The same applies for a pot that was used to cook kitnios for a child that must have kitnios on Pesach. Whether lechatchila you may use the pot is debatable. The Feinsteins hold that one ...


7

There are sources beginning in the 1200s (the Mordechai and others) that quote the practice to avoid various legumes and semigrains; either because of concern that they make contain some wheat (or other chametz-causing grain) mixed in; or because if you grind them into flour, people may think you're using wheat flour (or barley spelt etc.) and making ...


6

I can't see why the tobacco plant itself should be kitniyos. It's nowhere on this list; I'm unaware of any grain, semigrain, legume, or the like that can be made from the tobacco plant; and tobacco's closest edible cousins (botanically speaking) are potatoes, tomatoes, peppers, and eggplants -- all of which are generally eaten on Pesach. I have no clue how ...


6

Per the OU it is a current Mahlokes so ask your Rav. Those who say it is assur hold so because it is a species that is made into flour and "bread", it is grown and harvested like grain, and it is often processed in facilities that also process real grains. These are three of the major factors when it comes to determining what is included in kitniyos. Those ...


6

This question ought to be, "Why can Ashkenazi Jews not eat rice on Passover?" There are 5 grains that make Ḥametz when mixed with water and allowed to rise: barley, rye, oats, wheat, and spelt. Any others that have been added by communal custom are just that - additions by virtue of communal custom.


5

This list from the Star-K has many items that you can feed your cat on Pesach. Per the CRC-Chicago Kitniyot ingredients, such as corn and rice, are acceptable in pet foods for Passover, because while Ashkenazim do not customarily eat kitniyot, they are permitted to own and benefit from them.


5

The earliest source, Sefer Mitzvot ha-katan (SMaK) of R. Yitzchak of Corbeil lists, in French, pois (peas), fole (perhaps, fave, fava beans, 'ful' in Hebrew) & ris (rice), which he lists as 'types of kitniyot'. Prior to that, the designation 'kitniyot' applied primarily in the context of the laws of kilayim. Rambam conceptualizes three categories of ...


5

Kitniyot are not specified in the Torah at all. They are chumrot — binding customs of the community. The Sefardic kitniyot custom permits rice provided it has been carefully checked grain-by-grain before Passover begins to ensure that no chametz grains are in it. (How carefully depends on the tradition; I have seen "3 times" and "7 times" specified by ...


5

Firstly, I don't think people make food muktza for Yom kippur since they need it for children. (inedibles like raw chicken would be just like shabbos). As far as food being asur, the Mishna Berura 308:170 quotes "poskim" that an object's muktza status depending on the owner is only when the object is rejected because of its poor quality, but if someone ...


4

The first mention of the מנהג of the בני אשׁכנז to not eat קטניוֹת on פסח is from 12th century- Provence, in southern France: רבינוּ אשׁר בר שאוּל מלוּניל wrote ספר המנהגוֹת, a work on the customs of his area, which unfortunately is not extant in full today. The following quote from the רבינוּ אשר survives in רבינוּ מנוֹח’s ספר המנוּחה on the רמב"ם. Rabbeinu ...


4

If I recall correctly there were some concerns (at least a few years ago) with corn-derived preservatives or packaging materials with regards to some packaged nuts. It may not be "chopping the walnuts makes them kitniyot", but "your average bag of chopped walnuts bought at the store may have been treated with some kitniyot product." But there are a zillion ...


4

It is not the case that a ruling in the Talmud will always overcome any possible custom developed later. In Talmudic times, there was no customary prohibition of kitniyot. Rav Huna, in the quote, is giving an example of what may be used as the two cooked dishes, even though of course other simple dishes would be fine as well. And he specifies orez (which ...


4

There were briefly those who'd heard of this thing called coffee -- it's a "bean", you grind it -- who wondered if it were kitniyot. This was quickly rejected, I don't recall who it was who'd said "if you ever saw a coffee plant, you'd understand why it's not kitniyos." Very simply -- all kitniyos, like the 5 grains, are annuals. Coffee and chocolate are ...


3

Just because the English word is 'bean' does not mean that it is kitniyos. A good explanation can be found at What is Kitniyot? Here is the initial summary of that article. You can read the details there. Authored by the Orthodox Union. Copyright © 2008 Orthodox Union In addition to the Torah’s restrictions on owning, eating and benefiting from ...


3

I assume the question means the following case. A person had cooked rice and (let’s say) cooked oatmeal in front of him. He made the brocho BM”M on the rice and the question is whether this will cover the oatmeal. There are two stages to the answer. 1) Rice is not so choshuv (important) as oats. As proof see the Mishna Berura 208 (7)[30] where we see that ...


3

As per Rav Moshe Feinstein's approach, that the prohibition to eat kitniyos is a hanhagah shehinhugu chachamim, a custom that the Rabbis guided their flocks to keep. It does not have the status of a takannah, a law instituted by court. All the more so is this true according to the Chayei Adam's approach mentioned by Shalom. Since it was based on a good ...


3

To support for Shalom's answer that the issue isn't about chopped nuts being kitniyot per se, but rather kitniyot being used during the processing, we see from the OU- "Raw nuts in their shell do not require Passover certification. Shelled nuts that list BHA or BHT (preservatives) in the ingredients require special Passover certification. They are sprayed ...


3

Generally, things that do not have the tradition of being kitnyot, are not kitnyot. A good example of this is quinoa. It is similar in many ways to other types of banned kitnyot, yet the generally accepted halakhic authorities do not classify it as kitnyot, partly because it was not included in the original custom. Based on the tradition of kitynot, there ...


2

Sefer She'arim HaMetzuyanim BeHalacha (published appx 1950), commenting on the Kitzur Shulchan Aruch (Siman 117, Si'if Katan 7), mentions that green beans and, apparently, peas, may be considered Kitniyos as well. http://hebrewbooks.org/pdfpager.aspx?req=14619&st=&pgnum=113


2

The earliest written source for this custom seems to be Semak (Sefer Mitzvos Katan, also known as Amudei Golah, by Rabbi Yitzchak of Corbeil, 13th century), mitzvah 222 note 12. Evidently it goes back somewhat further than that, though, since he calls it "דבר שנוהגין בו העולם איסור מימי חכמים הקדמונים" - "something that people have customarily treated as ...


2

Rabbi Moshe Feinstein writes that if a custom developed about it at whatever point in time, for whatever reason, it's kitniyos; if not, then not. Regarding peanuts -- he doesn't say that they're not kitniyos because they're too new. He says there were different customs in different places, and where he came from had no custom against them. But if you know ...


2

Hm. As I understand it, the reason Ashkenazim don't eat matza-made-with-fruit-juice is to respect a minority opinion in Tosfos, that it would create a certain form of chametz. But if someone is ill, we rely on the majority opinion. Kitniyos is purely a custom, and one that was never decreed against those who are ill. Hence my guess is all else being equal, ...


2

Chametz is a biblical term which refers to grains which ferment when water is added. This fermentation causes the dough mixture to puff up. The talmud (Pesachimn 35a) discusses the fact that rice and millet also puff up when water is added. The structure of the discussion: The Mishna lists the grains that one may use for the mitva of eating matza on ...


2

There is no definitive answer. Some links permitting and some forbidding and some equivocating. It's hard to say either side should be viewed as violating halacha.


2

CANOLA OIL from the Orthodox Union. Canola oil, which is a form of rapeseed oil, should be considered kitniyot. The Star-K (Baltimore Va'ad Hakashrus also lists Canola Oil in its list of Kitniyos CRC goes into the details as to why rapeseed oil (Canola oil) is considered kitniyos (based on Maharsham I:183 that it was used in Europe). Note that the CRC ...


1

AFAIK that kitniyot is nullified in a majority is universally agreed upon. The Rama (OC 453:1) writes that we do not forbid a mixture into which kitniyot fell, and the Mishna Berura there notes that obviously this means that there must be at least a majority of non-kitniyot and that if any piece of kitniyot is visible (nikkar) one must pick it out.



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