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13

I heard Rabbi Berel Wein discussing that Rashi's headcovering (in the animated film made by Rabbi Wein) is red, maroon, and/or brown. The historical research shows those were men's colors for Jews in Rashi's time and place. Someone objected that it should be a black velvet yarmulka. Rabbi Wein replied that black happened in the 1400s as a result of a Church ...


10

According to Merriam-Webster: Etymology: Yiddish yarmlke, from Polish jarmułka & Ukrainian yarmulka skullcap, of Turkic origin; akin to Turkish yağmurluk rainwear


10

It doesn't mean anything. It stands for Yaray Malka. (Fear of G-d)


10

Orach Chaim 91:3 - The Beis Yosef says that Yesh Omrim that you are not allowed to say Hashem's name with your head uncovered.


9

אף-על-פי שבודאי שאין ללמוד תורה בגילוי ראש, מכל מקום אין זה מעיקר הדין, אך יש להזהר בזה מאד, ואפי' כשלומד לבד בחדרו. [שו''ת יביע אומר ח''ו חאו''ח סי' טו סק''ז]‏ Meikar Hadin (according to the letter of the law) one isn't obligated to learn with a head covering: nevertheless, one should certainly wear a head covering while learning (even alone in his ...


8

In this shiur by Rabbi Yonason Roodyn (17:26) he quotes the Rif that can be taken to mean that there is an obligation for gentiles to cover their heads in a synagogue.


8

Firstly, I don't know of anyone who requires a kippa as opposed to some other head covering. So if at work he could wear a beret, hard-hat, baseball cap, coonskin cap, deerstalker, you name it, by all means do that. There's the issue of head coverings for praying; for making blessings; for eating; and then at all other times. Much of yarmulka as we know ...


8

The Mishna Berura (2:11) quoted in the linked article brings from the Shaloh Hakadosh that while not required by the strict letter of the law it is considered "midas chassidus" (pious behavior) to cover one's head while sleeping.


8

Refer to Kings I chap. 8 v 41-42. After completing the building of the First Temple in Jerusalem, King Solomon prays to God: "Also to the stranger who is not from the nation of Israel who comes (to visit the Temple) from a far-away land for the sake of your name. For they will hear of your name and your strong hand and outstretched arm and he will come and ...


7

Kippot\Yarmulkas are not explicitly mentioned anywhere in Tanach, although it is possible that covering one's head was a common cultural practice. The first Halachic mention of covering one's head is in the Talmud, in the following places: Kiddushin 31a: R' Huna didn't go four amot with his head uncovered, saying "The Shechina is always above me." ...


7

I work at a job in sales where I deal with contracts and large amounts of money. I am also one of the few people on the team who are Jewish. My rav reasoned that due to the fact that some people are unhappy with the service we provide (and would immediately blame the fact that I was Jewish on their dissatisfaction) that wearing a kippah would cause a ...


7

There is no actual halakhic obligation for even a Jew to wear a kipa. The brakha in the morning (which is to be recited upon doing the action) "`oter Yisrael batifara" is recited upon wrapping a turban. See Mishne Torah hilkhoth tefilla pereq zen. Over time in Ashkenazi galut, various customs changed and wearing a kipa became the accepted practice. This is ...


7

The Mishna Berurah in siman 25 s"k 27 says that when putting on the Tefilah Shel Rosh, one should be careful that his head is covered before making the beracha. He gives the source as the Pri Megadim.


7

Mishna B'rura (2:12) writes that there are those who say that a toupee-wearer must wear a kippa on top of it because of maris ayin, but there are others who say it's not necessary. In other words: technically, it is a valid head-covering. But since we are worried that people will think that the toupee is his real hair and that he is not wearing a head ...


7

Let me break this question down. First, there is a minhag (custom) that men should cover their head as a sign of reverence to G-d. The custom was codified as halacha for men (Orech Chaim 91:3) which stated that it is forbidden to say G-d's name or to even walk into a Synagogue with your head uncovered. For me the practical aspects are (a) that the kippah ...


6

People seem to have turned kippah into a ritual object, when it really isn't. It's religiously appropriate to cover your head, and a kippah is just a convenient way to do so. In the Star-K guide to sheimos disposal, they make clear that a worn-out kippah can be thrown in the trash! (I suspect they saw people depositing them for dignified burial along with ...


6

Halacha Berurah says that your kippah should cover the majority of your head, and if you can't do that much, then it should at least be visible from all sides.


6

Rabbi Moshe Feinstein Zatzal wore such a Yarmulke Also Rabbi Elazar Menachem Man Shach Zatzal wore such a Yarmulke My understanding is that such a Yarmulke was worn at times when no hat was worn in order to completely cover the head.


6

Shaalos U'Tshuvos Minchas Yitzchak 4:60, Ben Ish Chai Parshas Vayishlach 1:17, Halichos Shlomo 13:26, mention putting on the Yarmulke first when finishing to bathe. Halichos Shlomo also mentions leaving on the Yarmulke until all the clothing is removed. צרוך ללבוש הכיפה בראשונה מיד כשבא למקומו לפני כל מלבישיו ולסלקו מראשו לאחר גמר פשיטת כל מלבושיו


6

Yes there is discussion, and since this is Judaism we're talking about, there is of course disagreement. The Kof-K has a document (PDF) regarding the wearing of the kippah, which footnotes numerous sources for the following sentence: Wearing a yarmulka is not necessary when a person is actually in the pool, shower, or mikvah Footnotes: Birchei ...


6

In Yalkut Yosef (Even HaEzer 21:9), Yitzhak Yosef writes in the name of his father, Hakham Ovadia Yosef (translation my own): פשט המנהג שבנות רווקות הולכות בגילוי ראש ברשות הרבים, שמעיקר ההלכה אשה שאינה נשואה אינה חייבת בכיסוי ראש. ורק בעת שמתפללות או מברכות ומזכירות שם שמים, תכסנה ראשן The general custom is for single women to go in public with ...


5

In America Orthodox Jews wear Kippot the same as in Israel. The temple you went to was probably a Reform or Conservative temple where the practice is for women to do more things like the men, and wear kippot. Yamaka is just Yiddish for kippa, like kippa is Hebrew for skullcap. Therefore, answer: The traditional traditions of the kippa are actually not so ...


5

The Mishna Brurah 8:4 brings the Bach who holds one should cover the heads with the tallis which brings yiras shamayim.The Mishna Brurah in hilchos hikon tefillah(I think siman 91,or 90,he brings that one should cover his face with the tallis during shemoneh esri.There are numerous sources which say to cover the head with a tallis.The Ben Ish Chai in Hilchos ...


4

The torah doesn't say that you should. It has become minhag yisroel to do it so that we fear hashem.


4

It says in the beggining of the Alter Rebbe's Shulchan Aruch (Shulchan Aruch Harav) that once it is the custom of people to cover that portion of their head, uncovering it is a problem with Tznius (like he mentions also walking without socks) which is more serious than a minhag.


4

I wrote a piece on another blog about 3 years ago, that I think is still valid as a general rule with regard to wearing a Kippah at job interviews or at work. And I still believe that if an employer won't tolerate your wearing a Kippah you may not want to work there, but everyone needs to make his own decision. However, in your particular case, it sounds ...


4

Rav M Feinstein held that a hand's worth is enough, as the question is raised in the Talmud whether one can use one's own hand to cover his head. (The answer is no, IIRC, but the hava amina proves the point.)


4

According to Halacha Berura (see O"H siman 2) the Kipa should cover most of the head. Also see Yalkut Yosef vol. 1 1:1. The Tefilin doesn't really cover most of the head (especially those of the Mequbalim). Yalkut Yosef: מדת חסידות להקפיד ללכת בכיפה גדולה המכסה את כל הראש, או רובו. ומכל מקום מותר מן הדין ללכת בכיפה קטנה שעל הראש, אף שאינה מכסה את רוב ...


4

The general practice I have seen in both in practice and in writing is that a non-Jew should wear a head covering in the Beis Kenesses: "The rule about a head covering in the synagogue should also be observed by non-Jews. The male visitor who does not have a head covering of his own, should take a skullcap provided by the synagogue. the skullcap ...


4

It seems to be that the answer depends on the effect that a baseball-cap covering your head has on you. From what I understand, the reason why we cover our heads all day is because of the gemara in Shabbat (156b) which says: כסי רישיך כי היכי דתיהוי עלך אימתא דשמיא (My) translation: "Cover your head so that there will be on you fear of heavens" which ...



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