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10

http://www.bknw.org/uploads/5/9/9/5/5995719/kiddush_using_disposable_cups-2.pdf Rabbi Moshe Feinstein Zatzal (Igros Moshe Orach Chaim 2 Siman 75) holds that a plastic cup should not be used for Kiddush and Havdala. Rabbi Eliezer Waldenberg (Tzitz Eliezer 12 - 23) holds that you may use a plastic cup for Kiddush and Havdala.


9

Normally kiddush requires a "reviis", which we'll call 3.3 fluid ounces. Kiddush (for shabbos day, as well as havdalah) may be recited on any chamar medina, "beverage of the land, which you'd serve a respected guest." In addition to wine/grape juice, this certainly includes: Beer (found in the Gemara) Apple juice (This appears in the Artscroll "Radiance ...


7

I have heard the same rumour. I found the following by Rav Aviner. He was asked that whether the Kiddush cup of the Chafetz Chaim was like the measurement of Ha-Rav Chaim Naeh and not like that of the Chazon Ish.   His answer was This is brought by Ha-Rav Moshe Karp as testified by the Chafetz Chaim's grandson, Ha-Rav Hillel Zacks, the Rav of the ...


7

At the end of this pdf (referenced here), he says: There does not seem to be any basis for the idea of doubling up a cup, as this does not cause the cup to be used more times than it otherwise would have been used.


6

I'm cross-posting my answer here as well. R' Meir Goldwicht of Yeshiva University addressed this in a Q&A a number of years ago. He felt that doubling a cup does absolutely nothing to solve the problem of the plastic cup not having "Kayamus" as he called it (permanence). He also called into question whether having a plastic cup in the first place was ...


6

Note: This answer was penned when the question was only "What is the minimum Shi'ur (volume) of a cup required for making Kiddush on liquor? Is there a smaller amount required than there is for wine?", without the "What is the minimum Shi'ur of the liquor that one is required to consume?" part. This is the subject of a dispute. The default halacha is that ...


5

Yes I do actually. It is a segulah, supposedly a surviving part of the book of refuot and segulot that was hidden by King Hezekiah. If made according the specifics brought down by the Rashash, and available online in the siddur of the 5th Rosh Yeshiva of Beit El Rav Raphael Yedida Abulafia(it runs on for several pages), the letters would be hand engraved ...


4

I'm cross-posting my answer from the "Related: using two plastic cups for Kiddush" question: R' Meir Goldwicht of Yeshiva University addressed this in a Q&A a number of years ago. He felt that doubling a cup does absolutely nothing to solve the problem of the plastic cup not having "Kayamus" as he called it (permanence). He also called into question ...


4

See here. In summary, the answers vary from tasting (a small sip), a cheekful (varies per person and is usually assumed to be the majority of the reviit), a reviit (86.4 mL). Kiddush Friday (or Yom Tov) Night -- ideally a cheekful, ex post facto even a reviit. Kiddush Shabbat (or Yom Tov) Day -- ideally a cheekful, ex post facto even a reviit. Havdalah -- ...


3

Four questions is a nice, traditional number :) Is there any minhag to fill a cup of wine to the point where it overflows? Kitzur Shulchan Aruch 86:7 כשמוזג את הכוס להבדלה, ימלאו על כל גדותיו עד שישפך קצת ממנו, וזהו לסימן ברכה When pouring the Havdala cup, they fill it to overflowing until a little bit spills out, and this is a good sign. I don't ...


3

This cup is 3 oz which is 88.7 ml and is actually a kiddush cup :)


3

Try this one. It's 94 mL which is as close as I'd feel comfortable with. The manufacturer's website is here, but the first link has free shipping in the USA. Lechayim!


3

R. Dov Lior answers the question here: http://www.yeshiva.org.il/ask/?id=62394 He says that: When one uses 2 cups, the outer cup is considered a utensil that serves the inner cup, and it will not be thrown away immediately, which perhaps solves the problem of R. Moshe that a single plastic cup is thrown away immediately and is therefore not appropriate for ...


3

I was told by a prominent North American posek that stemmed cups are an American trend that was all but unheard of in Europe of old, especially considering the preferable orientation of one's palm under the cup for mystical reasons.


2

The Lubavitcher Rebbe's (as well as his father's) cup didn't have a stem.


2

The double-cup is supposed to give it more significance. I've seen many a significant rabbi do this. Sorry, don't have sources off-hand.



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