Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

11

As a convert, this has been a bone of controversy in my family. My Rav, Rabbi Gedaliah Anemer, zt"l, said it was forbidden to enter the sanctuary of a church. Rabbi Maurice Lamm, in his book Becoming A Jew, also does not allow any leniency. When my father died, I brought up the issue because I was asked to speak at the memorial service. Another ...


9

Some have a custom to allow such marriages, but to have the siblings live afterwards in different cities. (This is sort of a compromise between the two positions that Shalom mentioned.) The Lubavitcher Rebbe zt"l writes in one of his letters (Igros Kodesh, vol. 3, p. 182) that his father R' Levi Yitzchak Schneersohn and his uncle R' Shmuel Schneersohn were ...


7

Yes. The Sefer Chasidim says not to, but the Noda Bihudah observes that the Talmud says it's fine. (See Barry's answer.) The Noda Bihudah concludes that the Sefer Chasidim must have been talking about some special case. (Marrying someone with the same name as your parent is a similar case -- Talmud says it's fine, Sefer Chasidim says it's a problem; ...


7

If I recall correctly, Yichud is okay short-term, but not preferable long-term. Here's the Rambam (Laws of Prohibitions on Relations Ch. 21), I don't know what the other opinions are. כא,ו המחבק אחת מן העריות שאין ליבו של אדם נוקפו עליהן, או שנישק אחת מהן--כגון אחותו הגדולה, ואחות אימו, וכיוצא בהן--אף על פי שאין שם תאווה ולא הנאה כלל, הרי זה מגונה ...


7

1 All relationships are severed when a person converts. 2 The convert was never related to their Jewish (from birth) father and does not become so when they convert. 3 No, they are not related. The phrase "converting together" is generally used when a husband and wife convert together. When they convert their non-Jewish marriage is dissolved and they marry ...


7

The source is Pesochim 111a and Horayos 13b where it says that it's koshoh leshikchoh (harms one's memory). Regarding relatives, Sefer Shemiras Haguf Vehanefesh page 333 brings from one sefer that it is mutar (allowed) (because the reason it is koshoh leshikchoh (harms one's memory) is because one diverts his attention from Torah to an Ervah, (so it doesn't ...


6

From Chabad.org: Kaddish is said for the deceased father or mother, regardless of how intimate or strained the relationship between deceased and bereaved. While the primary obligation is towards father and mother, it is also said, according to the custom of some communities, for other close relatives: brother, sister, son, daughter, and wife, for the ...


5

The Shulchan Aruch Harav says that the reason one is prohibited (and it says that the prohibition is in force nowadays) is because of the "evil spirit" there (and not because of Tznius). Therefore, at first glace, there should be no difference whether the two women are related to him or not.


5

"A man is not allowed to walk between two women." This whole notion appears in an aggadic, somewhat spooky-things-that-go-bump-in-the-night portion of the Talmud. It does not appear in Rambam's code of law, nor Shulchan Aruch. Some Jews (like the one asking this question, and the latter-day compendia cited in other answers here) still feel this is ...


5

Nitei Gavriel (Hilchot Yichud, chapter 3, halacha 11, footnote 14) brings several opinions (including R' Moshe) that all half-siblings have the same halachot as full siblings. This is what the Nitei Gavriel says in the halacha as well. He then brings that R' Eliyashev says only half-siblings on the mother's side are considered like full siblings. The reason ...


4

The gemoro in Pesachim 51A says that father, father-in-law, stepfather and brother-in-law (sister's husband) are forbidden, and that there are those who are machmir on brothers as well. According to Rashi the issue is that it would lead one to impure thoughts, to see the place from where he or his wife were produced, or thoughts about his brother-in-law and ...


4

http://www.sichosinenglish.org/books/the-laws-of-yichud/05.htm See Beis Shmuel, Even HoEzer 22:1. The permissibility of Yichud of a brother and sister includes half-brothers and half-sisters — Dvar Halachah Hosafos Chadashos 2; Divrei Sofrim Emek Davar 56. However, there is a prohibition of Yichud with a step-brother or step-sister.


3

See the linked answers. Let's say "not recommended", put mildly. I don't know the nature of this non-Jewish relative connection, that's its own set of issues. But in a nutshell: Judaism traditionally prescribes staying far, far away from anything that looks like non-monotheistic worship or a house thereof. There would be very little issue, as far as I ...


2

This is true on the de'oraisa level, i.e., on the level of Torah law. But mi-derabbanan, they are not allowed to marry each other so that it does not look like "they came from a place of greater holiness to a place of lesser holiness." In other words, since they were not allowed to marry when they were non-Jews, they can't marry as Jews either. Source: ...


2

Check out for the use of Father: Isaiah 63:16 and 64:7. 1 Chronicles 29:10 Deuteronomy 32: 6 Psalms 68:6 Malachi 1:6 for a start. And now Jeremiah 3:19.


2

God is often called Jews' "father" in Jewish texts, most famously in liturgy. (We ask that he have mercy on us as a father has on his children.) Occasionally, we're called his sons, too. This is all, of course, metaphorical: God has not physically sired anyone, being nonphysical himself. "Son of God" is a metaphor used for various holy people in the Bible, ...


1

A mamzer is the result of a relationship prohibited to the point of spiritual excision (Mishna, Yevamos 4:13). There is no prohibition of any severity for relations with one's self. Every act of normal relations that is prohibited has a verse and explanation of what relationship between those two people forbids their relations. Homosexual relations, which ...


1

Because the parent is not Jewish, there is no chiyuv (requirement) for you to sit shiva for them. That being said, there is a kibud av v'em (honor for father and mother) issue which must be contemplated when dealing with sitting shiva for a non-Jewish parent. Basically, there is a concern that the person would not be showing proper respect to his deceased ...


1

Perhaps somebody is confusing this with the list of relatives for whom a kohein must become tamei for (Lev 21:2-3), which includes an unmarried sister (but not a married one). My Jewish Learning says that the rabbis took the kohein's list in torah -- father, mother, son, daughter, brother (including half-brother on father's side), unmarried sister -- as the ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible