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Vayikra 19:32: מִפְּנֵי שֵׂיבָה תָּקוּם וְהָדַרְתָּ פְּנֵי זָקֵן Berachos 8b: והזהרו בזקן ששכח תלמודו מחמת אונסו, דאמרינן: לוחות ושברי לוחות מונחות בארון. Sefer HaHinuch 257: And for this reason, Issi Ben Yehuda said in the Gemara (Kiddushin 32b) that even a wicked old man [deserves honor]. That is, one who is not knowledgeable is ...


8

It's generally accepted to stack sfarim (books) in order of holiness, with the holiest on top. As a chumash is considered to be holier than a Siddur the Chumash goes on top. See this question for a quote from the Shulchan Aruch. Modern day Siddurim are a little more complicated, as they contain (often at the back) weekday and other Torah readings, but ...


7

The Baal Shem Tov asked this question (Keser Shem Tov Siman 22, quoted by the Lubavitcher Rebbe here) and answered as follows: The Gemora in Chagiga (3b) says that words of Torah are compared to a plant, for just as a plant grows and increases, so the words of Torah grow and increase. This means that when one teaches a Torah idea to another, he is not ...


7

Orach Chaim 224:12 Beer Haitaiv 8 says the reason that either grass or stone is placed on the grave is as a honor for the person buried there, as it shows that people came to his grave. There is no mention as to placing more than or less than one.


6

See Aruch HaShulchan 273:6 where he writes that there are those places where everyone makes his own kiddush, but "it is not appropriate to do so, and you should prevent them from doing this, and teach them that the mitzvah is better when one person makes kiddush on behalf of everyone." And he writes that the reason it is better is because of ברוב עם הדרת מלך ...


6

The most significant restriction on K'vod HaBrios is that it only applies to rabbinical enactments. I have never seen anyone permit tearing toilet paper directly, but I have seen it permitted to do so in a "backhanded" manner because of k'vod habrios. This is an more contemporary example of a classic example of the leniency of k'vod habrios found in ...


6

The commandment of kibbud av v'eim does not apply to adoptive parents (Sotah 49a - right before the Mishna). However, there is a moral obligation of hakarat hatov (gratitude) which requires that the child honor his/her adoptive parents. (Source. The article states that "one must honor his/her adoptive parents as much as if they were the biological parents." ...


6

Rambam Hilchos Ishus 15:19: וכן ציוו חכמים שיהיה אדם מכבד את אשתו יותר מגופו, ואוהבה כגופו; ואם יש לו ממון, מרבה בטובתה כפי הממון And similarly the Sages commanded that a person should honor his wife more than his own body, and love her like his own body. If he has money, he should increase her benefits according to his wealth.


6

Well, we learn (פסחים כב:) that we have to be in awe of Talmidei Chachomim from an extra word in the Pasuk that commands us to be in awe of Hashem - את ה' א-לקיך תִּירָא לְרַבּוֹת תַּלְמִידֵי חֲכָמִים. ‏ The laws concerning honouring and respecting a Talmid Chacham are very severe - as documented in שלחן ערוך - יורה דעה. Here's some samples: סימן רמב ...


6

The Igros Moshe YD 2:103 writes that it is a deplorable act for a Rebbi to ask his student to tell on another student who did something bad,and it will lessen the seriousness of loshen harah. The Chafetz Chaim in Hilchos Loshen Harah 5 writes that even if a father or rebbi asks him to say lashon harah it is prohibited. However, in a case of to'eles it is ...


5

Shulchan Aruch Yoreh Deah Siman 240:2 says “it is forbidden to call a parent or refer to them by their name; rather they need to be referred to as “My father [my teacher]”. This post shows that the use of the third person was well-known in the past. But for today, Rabbi Simcha Weinberg in his blog says “My father zt”l often explained that each generation ...


5

I've always assumed that Rashi means that the trek to Jerusalem was made in sandals. (Indeed, that is one time when everyone would need sandals.) They were forbidden in the Temple itself. No source, though.


5

Machzor Vitri - page 206 brings a story on Rosh Chodesh which was Chanuka where they took out 2 Sefer Torahs and the person who read the Torah, in error read 4 Aliyos in Rosh Chodesh and the Halacha was determined that had they not taken out a second Sefer Torah they could of just skipped the Chanuka reading, however since the Torah was taken out, if we did ...


5

There's an argument between R' Moshe Feinstein and R' Moshe Shternbuch. R' Moshe Feinstein (as mentioned by sam) says that it's disgusting , as (practically) the teacher is teaching that Lashon Hara is permitted. (or at least not so bad). Even though the Gemara reported instances when Amorayim would inform on their friends to their teacher, there the ...


4

Aruch Hashulchan (YD 293:6) equates all printed sefarim in kedusha and in terms of placing one on top of another: יורה דעה סימן רפג סעיף ו וכתב רבינו הרמ"א דכל זה בחומשים העשויים בגליון כספר תורה. אבל בשלנו שהם נכרכים – אין חילוק בין חומש לנביא. עד כאן לשונו. כלומר: דוודאי כל ספרי קודש הם קדושים, אך זהו קדושה כללית. אבל בפרטי הקדושות זה למעלה מזה, וספר ...


4

The Maharsha (Rosh HaShana 18b, s.v. U'mee harago)1, on the premise that Gedalya was in fact righteous, addresses the remaining question of why, if HaShem considers the death of a righteous person to be as calamitous as the burning of the Temple, we only have a fast day to commemorate Gedalya's death and not the death of other righteous people. The ...


4

If I'm not mistaken we refer to such a person as a "talmid chaver" -- I was Rabbi ABC's student, but now I've learned enough to be his colleague. It appears that some respect is still called-for. Shulchan Aruch YD242:4 (among other places) discusses the concept. For instance: One may not render psak in one's rebbi's presence ... however if one is 10 ...


4

Per my comment, I'm having a hard time imagining a practical case where it would matter, but I found that Rav Aharon Lichtenstein in an article on the topic thinks that this statement in the Rambam (סנהדרין פרק כד הלכה יז) would indicate that it does apply to non-Jews: ואל יהי כבוד הברייות קל בעיניו, שהרי הוא דוחה לא תעשה של דבריהם, וכל שכן כבוד בני ...


4

Just to give some perspective. This question Why isn't it considered idol worship to give respect to the torah? was met with reactions deeming it practically ridiculous to even ask such a thing. Now let's see what Rava says in Makkos 22b 'what fools all these other people are! Who stand up for a Seffer Torah, but don't stand up before a great Rabbi!' ...


4

Regarding יישר כוח, i will be basing information off of the Hebrew Wikipedia article on the phrase. What is the origin of these expressions? יישר כוח comes from a line in Shabbos 87a: שנאמר (שמות לד, א) אשר שברת ואמר ר"ל יישר כחך ששיברת חזק וברוך (some also say חזק ואמץ) seems to be based on the Gemara in Brachos 32b that says that four people ...


3

One must stand for someone who is seventy. Source: YD 244:1; see discussion. Regarding a elderly person standing for another elderly person,the Aruch Hashulchan YD 244:9 brings the Tur who says וכתב עוד: דהכי מסתבר נמי בשני חכמים או שני זקנים, שאין אחד צריך לקום מפני חבירו, אלא יעשה לו הידור. עד כאן לשונו. one does not have to fully rise if he is also 70 ...


3

So long as you aren't erasing the text, recording content-related notes in a text's margins is a very traditional Jewish practice. Consider this page from a very old Tanakh:


3

The Taz to YD 282:19 writes: נראה לי דאותן אנשים שנוהגים בשעת לימודם בספר ורוצה להגביה הספר שלומד פושט ידו ולוקח ספר אחר ומניח תחת זה שלומד דאיסורא איכא משום בזיון...כי בזה מבזה הספר להיות לתשמיש מה שיוכל לעשות בעץ או באבן...והוי בזיון גדול כל שהוא מביאו ממקום למקום אפילו בשלחן אחד אם לא שהספר התחתון מונח כבר ודאי שרי להניח השני עליו:‏ It seems to ...


3

Shulchan Aruch YD 282 prohibits sitting next to a sefer because that would be bizayon to the sefer. It seems to me standing shares the same din. According to rules of chinuch I would say that one should not deliberately put a child in such a place, if the child goes on his own, at the age of 2 I would assume take him down (or tell him to...)


3

The obligation of visiting one's teacher on Yom Tov is brought in Gemora Rosh Hashana 16b and Sukka 27b. Although codified by the Rambam (Talmud Torah 5:7) it does not appear in Tur or Shulchan Aruch (although the Magen Avraham does bring it on two occasions - 301:7 and 554:122). The Kaf Hachaim (OC 529:34) brings two contrasting views in the Achronim how ...


3

There is an issur of onaas devarim(hurting with words) Vayikra 25:17 see Rashi. The Sefer HaChinuch 338 brings down that this applies to ones children as well. Hurting someone else feelings is a severe prohibition(even through a gesture it is assur). ונוהגת מצוה זו בכל מקום ובכל זמן, בזכרים ונקבות, ואפילו בקטנים ראוי להזהר שלא להכאיבן בדברים יותר מדי, זולתי ...


3

The Mogen Avraham Siman 193:2, Shulchan Aruch Horav 185:4, and Mishnah Berurah Siman 193:5 say that it's best if everyone says it with the leader because it's hard to be Mechavin and listen to the Mekadeish.


3

Qitzur Shulhhan Arukh, Yalqut Yosef (Yoreh De'ah 242-244:12) states (my translation): היושב באוטובוס ונכנס תלמיד חכם או זקן, והגיע סמוך אליו, תוך ד' אמותיו (כשני מטר) והוצרך לעמוד בפניו כפי הדין, והחכם או הזקן נשארו עומדים תוך ד' אמותיו, מאחר ואין מקום פנוי באוטובוס, צריך לתת לו את מקומו לשבת One seated in a bus into which a Talmid Hakham or elderly ...


3

If we are talking about talking during davening, you can't. As to talking business in schul not during davening, it would tend to be forbidden. However, the Ben ish chai writes that if one is a sefarim seller, he may do business in the schul as the schul is the natural gathering place of people who study torah. A shatnez checker is in a similar situation.



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