New answers tagged

1

I have asked both the OU and the CRC about this. It would make sense that since unflavored beer doesn't require a hechsher and certain ingredients themselves don't require one that beer with them shouldn't require a hechsher. The example i asked about was coffee. The answer from both was that beer companies need to make it known when they flavor their beer ...


0

There isn't any real halakhic requirement to kasher items that are any degrees of separation from food. You only need to kasher items that are directly being used to cook food. The only time we are required to apply the Koshering Process is on items that are normally used directly on the fire, or are in contact with hot foods that are directly on the ...


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I found a relevant comment here: Some have the custom to kasher in a dedicated “kashering pot” which is not used for anything else, but most kasher in any pot which is clean and has not been used for 24 hours. It seems, therefore, that there is not a legal stringency to keep items used in the kashering process kosher. This would answer the "hot ...


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Wood containers. Bone containers. Stone containers. (According to some opinions glass containers). (I guess also leather is kosherabe) The above is If kashered means to be able to use it after it was used for not kosher


1

This is a very fundamental question that deserves a serious answer. I am attempting to provide one based on my own experience, and my knowledge that not everyone is prepared to consult an Orthodox rabbi about this (although they really should, and it is standard for Jews to do so about such matters). Basically, anything directly in contact with food during ...


5

There are two separate issues regarding kitchen utensils, dishes etc. One is if they absorbed non-kosher food in the past. Since these utensils are new, this is not a problem for ceramics and glass. However, it may sometimes be a problem for some new metal utensils, such as pans, that may have been coated with non-kosher fat as part of the manufacturing ...


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Some brands of organic/sustainable Tuna that can be found in the health food section of a grocery store will have "BY" stamped on the top of the can. This means it is from a special Bishul Yisroel run at the factory.


2

What you call blood is not what the Torah calls blood It has nothing to do with the amount only blood that is separated from the meat, or gathered together or moved (started to get out and stopped) is called blood (and biblically only if it was not salted A raw piece of meat is kosher if you wash the surface Yd 67 PRI megodim intro to laws of ...


2

Mehadrin is a general term, meaning enhanced/ stricter kashrut. People use it to describe a particular standard, or they might mean a general term for one or several hechsherim (kosher supervisions) e.g. Bedatz Eida Chareidis, Rav Landau, Rav Rubin, Sheeris Yisrael, Rav Machpud etc. The term can also be used by a local rabbinate hechsher to denote a higher ...


0

Mehadrin (from hiddur, meaning "beautified" or "embellished") is the generic term describing a certain level of kashrut, as described here, covering e.g., the presence of a supervisor in a kitchen, the type of meat being served (glatt vs. non-glatt), how shmita is being handled, etc. Badatz (acronym of Beth Din Tsedek) is a name for a kashrut organization ...



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