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2

The Halacha states (Shulchan Aruch 119:1-7) that if someone is a Mumar Ledavar Echad, a habitual transgressor in one prohibition he does not have a presumption of trustworthiness - chezkat kashrut within that thing itself. For example in your case, as you have stated, this person does not keep kosher (eating kosher only in the house is not called eating ...


5

It would seem to be that this establishment is not to be patronized and or trusted to be serving kosher food unless they have a kosher certification. This is based on a rule enacted by the Vaad Ha'arba Artzot - The Council of the Four Lands, the central body of Jewish authority in Poland from 1580 to 1764. The Vaad instituted that it is forbidden to eat any ...


3

See this list of "dried spices that are acceptable for kosher use without specific Kosher supervision" - Allspice is literally the first entry. Many spices are considered to not require supervision when by themselves. Blends require either supervision or a thorough spec sheet to ensure that the blend only contains spices (some blends use flavorants, sugars, ...


1

Human beings are not kosher, nor are the un-kosher. Since a person is not a behemah, chayah, or Oph (with the possible exception of Harvey Birdman), no form of shechitah is done on a person to render them fit for consumption. Eating a person would be a violation of several different aveiros, such as kavod hames and the obligation to bury, but eating treif ...


0

It may be possible that in the light of new scientific research, perhaps involving genetic engineering, pork eating will be allowed. In particular, a company called Modern Meadow is a working on producing synthetic meat. Tests with engineered comestible ground beef have been successful; in case pork is produced through a similar process, there is no animal ...


6

It says in Sanhedrin 59b כי הא דרבי שמעון בן חלפתא הוה קאזיל באורחא, פגעו בו הנך אריותא דהוו קא נהמי לאפיה, אמר: (תהלים ק"ד) הכפירים שאגים לטרף. נחיתו ליה תרתי אטמתא, חדא אכלוה וחדא שבקוה. איתיה ואתא לבי מדרשא, בעי עלה: דבר טמא הוא זה או דבר טהור? - אמרו ליה: אין דבר טמא יורד מן השמים. בעי מיניה רבי זירא מרבי אבהו: ירדה לו דמות חמור מהו? - אמר ליה יארוד ...


3

No, pigs will not be kosher food, not even when pigs learn to fly -- well, at least not until the Messiah comes or science finds a way to change the pig from a pig into something else a bit different. The Torah prohibits animals that can be eaten based on physical characteristics. Leviticus 11:1-32. A kosher animal among mammals must have a cloven hoof ...


1

There is a Midrash (Shocher Tov 146 I think) referenced by Ri ibn Shu'aib (14th cent.) in his drashos to Torah (Matos-Masei) that pig will become permitted in the future. the Or Hachaim to Leviticus (11:7) explains that pig will change biologically acquiring the sign of a kosher animal (chewing cud in a addition to split hooves). While some commentators ...


5

Judaism believed that God commanded us not to eat pork, and that this will not change. (It is one of Maimonides' 13 Fundamentals of Belief that the Torah will not be exchanged for another.) It's true that some of the classical commentaries observed that avoiding pork may have certain health benefits, but that was icing on the cake. Irrespective of the ...


11

No. Pigs are singled out by the Torah (Leviticus 11:7) as one of the unkosher animals that have a single kosher sign (they have split hooves but don't chew their cud), and as such, are Biblically prohibited. A Biblical prohibition cannot be overturned (Rambam's Laws of Foundations of the Torah 9:1). (According to some,) the kashrut laws were not instated ...


10

There is an Agadic opinion brought in Or Hachaim in parshas Shmini 11:7 that after the arrival of Moshiach, the pig will begin to chew its cud, and will at that point be Kosher.* Until that day, the Torah clearly gave two signs which we base our dietary laws upon which cannot be ignored. Whether or not Rabbis throughout the ages have tried to make keeping ...


1

Shulchan Arukh YD 294:9 (based on Kiddushin 39a) rules that doubtful (safek) Orlah in the Diaspora is permitted; only certain (vadai) Orlah is prohibited. Even if you know the fruit came from a orchard with Orlah trees, if you don't know which tree it came from then it is permitted. So any fruit you find in the grocery which was not imported from Israel and ...


7

The medrash tanchuma on parshas Shmini #7 takes the opinion that at that great feast of Beheimos and Leviason, the mitzvos which until now were only to purify/smelt the people with will no longer apply. The proof is that the Beheimos will not have a proper slaughtering, but will rather be killed by the Liviason. The medrash goes on to prove that Liviason is ...


1

Halachically Speaking (7:2) has a great overview of this question: There is a discussion in the poskim regarding the status of a Jew who is not observant. The Rambam states that a Jew who is mechalel Shabbos (openly) is considered like a non-Jew for all mitzvos. The Pischei Teshuva debates the status of a mechalel Shabbos (mumar) in regard to bishul ...


3

It's just a good practice as often kids may touch the ketchup bottle to the hamburger/pizza/mac&cheese when spreading ketchup on it, or their hands are messy. Stuff like that. (Especially if they have two refrigerators, you keep a bottle in each!) Shulchan Aruch talks about separate salt cellars, but that's because people would dip their bread, cheese, ...


-3

Both of you are Jewish. If you are concerned about the concept of 'Bishul Akum' - a Gentile turning on the stove, it obviously doesn't apply, here. I understand that perhaps, you have a separate concern that your mom may bring in non-kosher food, may mix meat with dairy pots or cook food that is kosher but not to your kashrut standards. If these are ...


4

I don't really know what the situation in other countries in, but for a very long time, the only meat sold in stores in America has been soaked and salted. Even if a kosher-labelled piece of meat has not been salted properly, it's בטל ברוב, as the overwhelming majority of meat is completely kosher. ...you used the word "treyf," by which you probably meant ...


1

Since the majority of produce on the market is not Orlah, we can assume that any given fruit etc. it is permissible, using the halachic principle of rov. (Regarding Reva'i, I'm pretty sure it doesn't apply in the diaspora. The mishna in Kiddushin only mentions Orlah.) (I'll try to add an explicit source later).


1

I've thought about this for a while, and perhaps is has something to do with Yeshayahu 65:4. In that chapter, G-d is talking about how much he is upset at those who "vex Him to His Face" and (if I understood it correctly) will destroy them from amongst His people, while saving the righteous. In verse 3 and 4, the prophet enumerates a list of things G-d says ...


5

The Atlanta Kashrus Agency does not recommend the KORC. The AKC does not recommend the KORC certification. Lettuce products with this certification have been found to have have insects and require additional washing and checking.


6

Considering the opacity around the acceptability of different kashruth certification organizations in America, I don't think many people will be able to accurately answer this question. That being said, KORC appears on neither the cRc nor KosherQuest (Rabbi Eidlitz, based in California) lists of reliable hashgachot (although they of course have disclaimers ...


5

This info is on Kashrut.com : Orthodox Rabbinical Council of San Francisco 1851 Noriega Street, P.O. Box 22491, San Francisco, CA 94122 415-564-5665, Fax: 415-665-0394 Rabbi Jacob Traub, Chairman Email: orcsf@aol.com I could not find any info on any kashrut site regarding its reliability. As a matter of fact, various web forums debate its kashrut, with ...


0

According to the answer to this question : The materials used in the cigarettes are not edible I realize that the question was regarding its use on Pesach, and the answer states that they are not Chametz, b/c it is inedible. Therefore, something that is not considered food, has no concerns of Kashrut.


10

from Dose of Halacha: The Shulchan Aruch (YD 117:1) writes that one mustn’t do business with any food which is forbidden to eat mideoraisa. The Rema and Beis Yosef (YD 117) write that one mustn’t, therefore, buy such food for one’s non-Jewish workers as one stands to benefit from giving such gifts (See Kaf Hachaim YD 117:28). The Taz (YD 117:2), ...


3

I have been to many, many Pesach programs, all "Glatt Kosher" with "Top-notch Kashrus". The truth is, though, the quality of Kashrus varied greatly from program to program. From several unpleasant experiences, I have gathered some questions to ask the Mashgiach and previous attendees of the program before you sign up: Who is the Mashgiach? Can you get ...


0

I heard from a Rabbi, a popular Halachah teacher in Bais Yaakov high schools, that while essentially one would be permitted to use the same glasses for milk and meat, nowadays it is not the custom for two reasons: 1) Glasses may be used for actual hot milk and meat. Or, they are often exposed to hot milk and meat in the dishwasher. 2) There is a concern ...



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