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2

Kosher meat restaurants work out the Nine Days in various ways. First and foremost, ask the restaurant, the mashgiach, and the kosher-certifying agency how they're handling this. (If their attitude is entirely lackadaisical, I'd think twice about their general kashrut.) There are restaurants that have a large Sephardic clientèle, for whom the "Nine Days" ...


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There are many Biblical issues with food additives, both pig and cow based, which would prohibit consumption. The food might contain a non-kosher species, such as pig or insect. The food might also contain a cow which was not slaughtered properly in accordance with the laws of shechita, which is a neveilah. Or it might contain forbidden fats, namely cheilev....


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Firstly, mixture is not the criterion for the scriptural prohibition. The scriptural prohibition concern cooking them together. Not cooked together See SA YD 87, 1, the words of Rema, a mixture in which meat and milk are not cooked together is prohibited__ rabbinically only, and for eating only, not for benefit (some Acharonim do not agree but the Shach ...


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Rabbi Moshe Feinstein ruled that a woman may be appointed as a mashgicha. See 2 teshuvos beginning here


3

The OU and cRc have the policy that bagged, washed iceberg lettuce is almost never a bug issue. Therefore, a bagged iceberg (or iceberg/cabbage/carrot) mix with a hechsher needs no further checking. (Iceberg forms a very tight head, which is harder for bugs to penetrate. As the OU's Rabbi Genack said, "why do people prefer romaine lettuce? Brighter color, ...


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Leaven is a chemical interaction between any of the 5 grains wheat, spelt, oats, barley, or rye and yeast. (And, technically, what we today call oats isn't the original oat, not "shibolet se-orah" as it was back then. It actually doesn't ferment like the other 4, so we likely lost a species along the way an substituted.) Yeast alone is not leaven, as ...


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H/t @DoubleAA From the Kof-k Bishul Akum on Potatoes A food which is eaten raw or is not fit for a kings’ table never has a problem of bishul akum.1 There is a discussion in the poskim whether a potato is fit to be served on a kings’ table. Some poskim say a potato is fit to be served on a kings’ table2 while others hold it is not.3 If a ...


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Outside of Israel and the US, observant Jews don't rely on Hecshers to buy food, because as you've noticed from the Japanese box, there just aren't any hecshers. Rabbis in these communities give out lists of acceptable ingredients (or lists of non acceptable ingredients) and people go and shop at their local markets and buy unsupervised food all the time. ...


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Your question seems to beg two things - Is it reliable, as well as some info about the hashgacha. As for info, I located this article about the supervising rabbi, Rabbi Israel Mayer Steinberg of Vaad Harabonim Lemeshmeret Hakashrut, as well as this article that focuses a bit more specifically on the 2nd Ave. Deli. The controversy, as I understand it, ...



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