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The word glatt was invented in America when the union workers in the slaughterhouse industry were irreligious and unreliable, but couldn't be fired. So the Rabbis of the time ingeniously invented a new indefinable word which allowed them to choose the workers they pleased. This information is courtesy of Rabbi Belsky. This has nothing to do specifically ...


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See this article in Hebrew for more detail. The overall concept is based on Chulin 37b: (יחזקאל ד) ואומר אהה ה' אלהים הנה נפשי לא מטומאה ונבלה וטרפה לא אכלתי מנעורי ועד עתה ולא בא בפי בשר פגול הנה נפשי לא מטומאה שלא הרהרתי ביום לבא לידי טומאה בלילה ונבלה וטרפה לא אכלתי מנעורי שלא אכלתי בשר כוס כוס מעולם ולא בא בפי בשר פגול שלא אכלתי מבהמה שהורה בה חכם ...


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In Hulin, Daf מו עמ' ב. The concept is perhaps not what you think it is. It is one of the Triefos, a hole in the lungs (called Sircha), which some Poskim (like Rashi) say that if you find some scar in the lung, you need to check if there is a hole, and others say that the scar indicates a hole no matter our further observations find, and the meat is Trief. ...


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It's called נעיצה, and all the sources I've seen have specified that the ground must be hard when you thrust the knife in. I don't know the exact origin, and this is not an exhaustive list, but it is mentioned by the Rambam (maachalot asurot 6:20 and 17:7), and followed by the Shulchan aruch (YD 121:7, YD 10:1, ), and the Rema (YD 89:4, YD 69:20) in certain ...


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Yes a Mashgiach can enter a restaurant, hotel or factory on Shabbos for the purpose of supervising. It happens all the time. In Israel too. (Source: Experience and people I know who have done it and do it. I once worked a Pesach Hotel over Yom Tov. The 20 minute Seder was particularly fun /sarc). A restaurant has some particular complications when it is ...


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The Simlah Chadasha (10 "יתר דיני סכין"), discusses different ways to mess up a knife and how to fix them. If someone slaughters a טריפה1 (an animal that has certain physical deformities, such that it would not live 12 months), the knife must be cleaned (via rinsing הדחה or rubbing קינוח) from the fats of the טריפה. But, if one killed three טריפות in a ...


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You might be referring to the practice of thrusting a knife into dirt 10 times as part of kashering. I will cut and paste some posts I found on the subject from http://www.imamother.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=248118 The halacha is, if you treif up a knife you can't just boil it in water like you would do any other kind of silverware, you have to stick it ...


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Because the question asks, "which sources say yes and which sources say no", I feel like the question warrants a response that includes a few more sources. The most comprehensive discussion of the issue is published by Dr. Ari Zivotofsky in Bar Ilan's journal Bechol Derachecha Daeihu (vol. 19) and its history is summarized in this news article. Rav Hershel ...


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According to Wikipedia: Next, noodles can be dried in one of two ways: by frying or by hot air drying. Fried instant noodles are dried by oil frying for 1–2 minutes at a temperature of 140-160 degrees Celsius. The frying process decreases the moisture content from 30-50% to 2-5%. Common oils used for frying in North America consist of canola, cottonseed ...


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Assuming that you're only talking about the grill proper, i.e. the metal grid the meat rests on, you would need to do libun. The required temperatures can be reached with a propane torch. YMMV as to whether or not a propane torch counts as special equipment.


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The Shulchan Arukh rules (OC 451:4) that a vessels used on a fire like a skewer or grill need to be heated up until sparks come off of them in order to kasher them. My understanding is that this is about 1000 degrees Fahrenheit or when it glows red. If it is earthenware you'd have to refire it in a kiln (ibid. :1). I can't comment about the specifics of any ...


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You are obligated to treat them with an attitude of respect, and speak to them respectfully. However, you should still keep shabbos, kosher, and the like, despite their wishes to the contrary. (When it comes to something like a custom or chumra, it can vary.) That means saying "I love you mom, but sorry, I feel that I need to eat kosher", not "mom you ...


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After the Return by Rabbis Mordechai Becher and Moshe Newman, a guidebook for baalei t'shuva, covers this. To summarize the discussion in Chapter 6: You should offer to do (and fund) the shopping to avoid placing an extra burden on them. The best case is that they agree to kasher the kitchen, and he says that some parents are actually willing to do that ...


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There's a general rule that if a parent asks or makes you violate any halacha, you should not listen to them. As you know, within halacha there are interpretations, minimal requirements and leniencies. You need to have a clear understanding of how these work for each action and situation. So, while I have mentioned a general guideline, there si no tacit ...


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The reality is that for many Baalei Teshuva they simply won't have the knowledge to really dynamically adapt to such a situation. Things like this can raise situations that can absorb the greatest Rabbis in discussions about exactly what to allow and what not, and anyone facing this situation for real should discuss the expected situation in advance with ...


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A main part of the answer seems to be in some of the above comments. In brief, the easiest solution is to use cold already prepeared foods and paper / plastic goods. By "cold" I refer to either items already cooked that don't need to be reheated (e.g. - take out), or items that don't have to be heated in the first place (bread, cereal, cheese, etc.) If you ...


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According to this Islamic opinion, it is generally acceptable for a Muslim to eat kosher meat, so if the restaurant underwent kosher supervision, it would no longer need halal supervision. (However, it is worth noting that the article below notes that some Muslims may not agree with this, and it will all depend on the religious preferences of the owners) ...


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My understanding of Halal (and therefore take that with a significant grain of salt - but I did read an article about it once) is that it would actually make things more complicated. The supervision would be duplicative, and the issues, while overlapping are not fully satisfied. And it would only be possible if something about the Halal certification was ...


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This article by Nishmat's Rabbi David Sperling explains the issues of non-kosher utensils and bishul akum (2 and 4 from the Chabad site) more in-depth, including when they apply. He also goes into a few other issues such as mar'it ayin, cold and sharp foods, and additional concerns in Israel. (The article isn't specifically about vegan restaurants but is ...


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The Kaf Hachayim on Yore Deah 108:70 and Darkei Teshuva 108:102 conclude that one may not smell those things that are Assur Behana'ah, but one may smell things that are only Assur Ba'achilah.


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Mishne Berurah (Biur Halacha 216:2 s.v. haMusk) writes that one should not deliberately smell nonkosher food out of concern that they may be tempted to eat it. He reiterates his position in regards to smelling Chametz on Pesach which is also assur bahana'ah and all year long people eat it that one may not smell it on Pesach. However, closing one's nose is ...


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As a general principle in halacha, קול ומראה וריח אין בהם משום הנאה: sound, sight, and smell are not considered benefit. This comes from the rules of me’ilah (improper personal benefit from sacred items), but should extend to other matters as well. (At Nullifying Ancient Israelite Idols, note that Rabbi Dov Lior applies this principle to avodah zarah, which ...



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