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The OU and cRc have the policy that bagged, washed iceberg lettuce is almost never a bug issue. Therefore, a bagged iceberg (or iceberg/cabbage/carrot) mix with a hechsher needs no further checking. (Iceberg forms a very tight head, which is harder for bugs to penetrate. As the OU's Rabbi Genack said, "why do people prefer romaine lettuce? Brighter color, ...


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Kosher meat restaurants work out the Nine Days in various ways. First and foremost, ask the restaurant, the mashgiach, and the kosher-certifying agency how they're handling this. (If their attitude is entirely lackadaisical, I'd think twice about their general kashrut.) There are restaurants that have a large Sephardic clientèle, for whom the "Nine Days" ...


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There are many Biblical issues with food additives, both pig and cow based, which would prohibit consumption. The food might contain a non-kosher species, such as pig or insect. The food might also contain a cow which was not slaughtered properly in accordance with the laws of shechita, which is a neveilah. Or it might contain forbidden fats, namely cheilev....


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For complicated and uninteresting reasons, I was planning to eat the real matza afterwards anyway, so my first bracha covered it assuming it was a valid bracha. It seems to be the main reason of YLOR. This rule is learned by Tosfot from the Yerushalmi. Here is a snippet from Tosfot masechet Brachot daf 39a: ועוד יש בירושלמי היכא דבריך אתורמוסא למיכליה ...


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Firstly, mixture is not the criterion for the scriptural prohibition. The scriptural prohibition concern cooking them together. Not cooked together See SA YD 87, 1, the words of Rema, a mixture in which meat and milk are not cooked together is prohibited__ rabbinically only, and for eating only, not for benefit (some Acharonim do not agree but the Shach ...



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