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8

See this article in Hebrew for more detail. The overall concept is based on Chulin 37b: (יחזקאל ד) ואומר אהה ה' אלהים הנה נפשי לא מטומאה ונבלה וטרפה לא אכלתי מנעורי ועד עתה ולא בא בפי בשר פגול הנה נפשי לא מטומאה שלא הרהרתי ביום לבא לידי טומאה בלילה ונבלה וטרפה לא אכלתי מנעורי שלא אכלתי בשר כוס כוס מעולם ולא בא בפי בשר פגול שלא אכלתי מבהמה שהורה בה חכם ...


6

Even people who care about kashrut sometimes find it challenging to manage. Asking someone who is not invested in it to maintain a kosher kitchen is, I suspect, very unlikely to work out, no matter how much good will the people start with. In my marriage we have different opinions about kashrut, and what we decided was that, since I care more, I own the ...


6

Apparently, some Dannon yogurts (with K) and Yoplait yogurts (with KD) are under the supervision of Rabbi David Sheinkopf and Rabbi Barnett Hasden, respectively. (Regarding Rabbi Hasden's hashgacha, see this related question). I'm not certain whether either of those rabbis provide supervision with kashrus standards that are widely considered acceptable. ...


6

Dannon has OU Certification on some products. The ones with a plain K are certified by Rabbi Dr. David I. Sheinkopf. Those products contain Beef Gelatin which some Kosher Certifiers will allow even if the cows were not slaughtered in a Kosher manner. I imagine that Dannon doesn't say the D because it is considered obvious. That used to be standard practice ...


5

Because the question asks, "which sources say yes and which sources say no", I feel like the question warrants a response that includes a few more sources. The most comprehensive discussion of the issue is published by Dr. Ari Zivotofsky in Bar Ilan's journal Bechol Derachecha Daeihu (vol. 19) and its history is summarized in this news article. Rav Hershel ...


4

Yes a Mashgiach can enter a restaurant, hotel or factory on Shabbos for the purpose of supervising. It happens all the time. In Israel too. (Source: Experience and people I know who have done it and do it. I once worked a Pesach Hotel over Yom Tov. The 20 minute Seder was particularly fun /sarc). A restaurant has some particular complications when it is ...


4

You might be referring to the practice of thrusting a knife into dirt 10 times as part of kashering. I will cut and paste some posts I found on the subject from http://www.imamother.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=248118 The halacha is, if you treif up a knife you can't just boil it in water like you would do any other kind of silverware, you have to stick it ...


4

Since the question is asked based solely on Vayikra 11:8, the answer is (as quoted by Rashi there, but this is the generally accepted view) that there is no issue with touching them, except in connection with the Temple at the time of the holidays of Pesach, Sukkos and Shavuos (or any other time a Jew wanted to be there). and you shall not touch their ...


3

If the chocolate was pareve, then based on YD 95:2, it would seem to be permitted to consume, even if some say it should not have been poured to begin with. If the chocolate was dairy then the pot, chocolate, and cheesecake are not kosher.


3

According to Wikipedia: Next, noodles can be dried in one of two ways: by frying or by hot air drying. Fried instant noodles are dried by oil frying for 1–2 minutes at a temperature of 140-160 degrees Celsius. The frying process decreases the moisture content from 30-50% to 2-5%. Common oils used for frying in North America consist of canola, cottonseed ...


3

In Hulin, Daf מו עמ' ב. The concept is perhaps not what you think it is. It is one of the Triefos, a hole in the lungs (called Sircha), which some Poskim (like Rashi) say that if you find some scar in the lung, you need to check if there is a hole, and others say that the scar indicates a hole no matter our further observations find, and the meat is Trief. ...


2

It's called נעיצה, and all the sources I've seen have specified that the ground must be hard when you thrust the knife in. I don't know the exact origin, and this is not an exhaustive list, but it is mentioned by the Rambam (maachalot asurot 6:20 and 17:7), and followed by the Shulchan aruch (YD 121:7, YD 10:1, ), and the Rema (YD 89:4, YD 69:20) in certain ...


2

The Simlah Chadasha (10 "יתר דיני סכין"), discusses different ways to mess up a knife and how to fix them. If someone slaughters a טריפה1 (an animal that has certain physical deformities, such that it would not live 12 months), the knife must be cleaned (via rinsing הדחה or rubbing קינוח) from the fats of the טריפה. But, if one killed three טריפות in a ...


2

Seems that either they use wine/grape juice concentrate (assuming it was Halachicly cooked when it's concentrated) or else they use Kosher Wine under supervision. Once wine is added to the mix (or spices to the wine) it no longer has the problem of s'tam yenam, and no longer needs tight "Kosher Wine" supervision, as explained below: See Shulchan Aruch, ...


2

Glatt and Chalak have different stringencies and leniencies relative to the other. From kosherpoint.com: Not all sirchot are equal. There are certain areas of the lung, where a sircha will not make the animal treif. However, there are differing opinions as to the extent of these areas. The Sephardi view (following the Beit Yosef) is more lenient – ...


1

Here's a quote from the Rema YD 92:7: ואם נשפך חלב או שאר איסור רותח על גבי קרקע והעמידו עליו קדירה חמה אם מה שנשפך אינו אצל האש לא הוי רק כלי שני ולכן הקדירה אסורה דבולע קצת והתבשיל מותר דתתאה גבר My Loose translation: And if [hot] forbidden fat (or any other hot forbidden food) spilled on the ground, and one put a hot pot on it, if what spilled is not ...


1

I wouldn't look at the menu so much as any given food ingredient. And yes, the OU and Star-K have called the White House kitchen, the Royal Danish kitchen, and others. Generally speaking -- "would you use canned X?" "No, we'd only cook it fresh ourselves?" (The Star-K had asked about canned cranberry sauce; the OU had asked about baked beans.)


1

Not sure if this is what you're looking for but the fact that you now have an uncertainty about the presence of the "unreliable" rabbanut's ingredients in the purchased product certified by the "reliable" rabbanut is usually halachically relevant - e.g. if now there is a sefek sefeika (double uncetainty) or safek d'rabanan (l'kula). (Menachem's application ...



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