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10

See OU.org that broiling is an alternative method for Koshering meat. The Torah forbids the consumption of the blood of an animal. The two accepted methods of extracting blood from meat, a process referred to as “koshering”, are either salting or broiling.


7

First of all, meat can be eaten raw (unsalted, unroasted, un-anything, straight from the carcass) after just rinsing it (YD 67:2). Regarding salting, a non-trivial number of rabbinic authorities (even current ones) have allowed using sugar to 'salt' meat when salt was not an option (for availability or medical reasons). See this article for a sampling of ...


5

Dose of Halacha goes through the various opinions of toiletries that contain alcohol over Pesach. He explains why it isn't a problem. R’ Ovadia Yosef (Yalkut Yosef 447:2) permits using products that contain denatured alcohol on Pesach. R’ Chaim Elazar Shapira (Minchas Elazar 5:37) writes that while people are particular, once alcohol has been denatured, ...


4

If it's kitniyos then it's definitely not customarily kosher-for-passover for Ashkenazi Jews who refrain from eating kitniyos on Passover. However, even those who do eat kitniyos on Passover generally only do so with a reliable kosher-for-passover certification since there's generally not assumed to be any guarantee otherwise that there are no chametz ...


3

The answer to that other question provides most of the answer to this question, which is that you may engage in non-commercial activity with most non-Kosher foods. You may buy pork, and you may give pork away to a poor non-Jewish person. However, you may not gain any benefit, not even the intangible benefit of thanks, from a cooked meat/milk mixture, nor ...


3

There appears to be a difference of opinion between contemporary authorities regarding whether and how a Jew's triggering the cooking process using some indirect electronic means grants the resulting food "cooked by a Jew" (bishul Yisrael) status. Here are some pertinent opinions that I found online, which may not be representative of the full gamut of ...


3

According to the cRc site: "Cranberries - Fresh do not require kosher certification. Dried require a reliable kosher certification. " The Star-K says that fresh produce bought in a supermarket poses no problem. Chabad.org writes, "Fresh, unprocessed fruits and vegetables, however, do not require certification. " Page 92 of the OU Passover guide (from ...


1

Here's the reply I received from the OU. The Webbe Rebee didn't say anything about the OU appearing on the Starburst website. *Thank you for contacting the OU. We do not currently certify any Starburst candy. Please do not hesitate to contact us again should you have any further questions. Sincerely, The Web(be) Rebbe Orthodox Union Kashruth Division*


1

Even being a minority shareholder in a corporation does not necessarily imply that the laws of ownership do not apply. Some authorities (e.g. the Kitzur Shulchan Aruch) do not even allow depositing money in a bank with minority Jewish ownership because of the concerns of ribith (usury). (Even those who are lenient in such a case [e.g. the Shoel U'Meishiv] ...


1

I am not sure how similar the prohibition of not benefiting from Chametz is to not benefiting from mixtures of meat and milk, so having said that... I was once given cookies by a non-Jewish friend. The cookies ingredients included milk and - believe it or not - beef fat. I asked an (Orthodox) Rabbi about Bal Taschit (avoiding wastefulness) and throwing ...



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