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7

Salt in and of itself is inherently Kosher. In most consumer and industrial applications, no kosher-sensitive ingredients are added to salt, so it can in fact be used without Kosher certification. "Kosher salt" would actually be more properly named "Koshering salt." What is special about it is that it is coarse grained. This makes it suitable for preparing ...


6

This issue is the one behind the famous New York City non-Kosher water scandal. Basically, the issue is that there are tiny crustaceans in NYC tap water. The Star-K gives a nice overview of the issue. In short, everybody agrees that if a micro-organism is too small to be seen without magnification, it does not cause any kashrut issue. On the other-hand, ...


4

The answer to this question depends on whether non-Jews have the obligation of לפני עיוור לא תתן מכשול (the prohibition of placing a stumbling block before the blind). I address this question in this answer. In summary, the prohibition of lifnei iver--even according to the more stringent opinion--only applies to non-Jews for halachot that they are obligated ...


3

A woman is permitted (as they are also required to eat Kosher therefore they can supervise on this). Someone who is not Shomer Shabbat cannot be (as you cannot trust them). The kashrut authority will have their own set of standards beyond this. This is quoted from London Beit Din: MASHGICHIM -WHO IS ELIGIBLE? What does KLBD look for in a mashgiach? ...


3

No, a wire would not be a good shechita knife, because when it's cutting, it goes entirely under the neck, which is a problem of חלדה, "tunneling." חלדה is one of the five main halachos of shechita. See שמלה חדשה 24:9 et seqq for more info. To borrow an illustration of חלדה from a previous answer of mine, this is not חלדה, but if the circled area goes under ...


2

Drisa is the problem that comes to mind. A sharp object that cuts by slicing when moved across the animals neck is allowed. Drisa is cutting through pressure applied in a downward force. Using a cheese cutter or the like would render the animal a niveila. Unfit to eat and Tamei.


2

With only some exceptions, the animals listed in the Torah are of something that Jews today are uncertain about how to associate with the correct animal today. Kosher in animals is generally determined by having split hooves and chewing cud. That is the physical properties of the animal make it Kosher. Regarding birds, the understanding is that the Torah, ...


1

There are at least three positions most people refer to when they say mashgiagh. The following are things I've heard from my Rebbeim and fiends who are in the hashgacha business. The person who's name or organization is on the store or taking care of an event, who, either in person or through an employee, is supposed to pop in once in a while to make sure ...


1

This Star-K article delves into a discussion of the kashrut of partridges, pheasants and locusts. There is also some additional information on the topic via Natan Slifkin's studies on various animals on www.zootorah.com. I don't have access, now, to locate the exact articles. Perhaps, I can edit this in, later. I understand that he is a highly controversial ...


1

Assuming the pie is actually edible and tasty (as opposed to shaving cream), if he is licking it and swallowing it, that is what the halachik definition of eating is. That his intent is otherwise should be irrelevant, as we find that even misasek (unintended action) by chalavim (forbidden fats) and arayot (forbidden sexual unions) is chayyiv (obligated) a ...



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