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This question is in the Rishonim in chapter Gid Hanashe (Chulin Ch. 7). Klipa is not an issur Davuk. Rabeinu Yerucham explains that A klipa is a limit of maximal penetration of the Issur. In issur dabuk, there is no such limit. This is the principle in 2 words. I remember that there is in Bach something from Raaviah about this. Here are some words from ...


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It's the Vaad Hakashruth of the Capital District, which the cRc currently says is acceptable. Inside the star is a "V"-and-"h" combination with a "C" in the upper-left and a "D" in the lower-right: VHCD is the initialism of the organization's name.


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I didn't find pictures unfortunately, but sharp heads are just that - like in sharks, while kosher fish have a more rounded head, as their mouths are in the front. The spine means actual bones, as opposed to no bones, or cartilage. Kosher fish will always be from the bony fish family. Some more here and here. But the main point I think, as mentioned in the ...


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Yes, lechatchila this should be avoided (according to some, lest the following two assumptions don't actually hold in this case), however it is generally allowed (to most sources that I found) because the soap "פוגם" any piece of food (i.e. makes it inedible), and secondly, people do not wash dishes with boiling water (and therefore the taste is not ...


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It appears not to be an issue if her mouth is empty from real food. R Yair Spolter and R Shraga Simmons answer here (paraphrased) Food that is not fit for human consumption is not considered food -- and for instance doesn't require a bracha (see Orach Chaim 202:2 with Mishnah Berurah 19). I also heard from my Rav that food that someone (say a ...



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