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16

No. No matter how would be classified: Fish: Scales could not be removed without ripping skin. Reptile, insect, animal (Behema/Chaya): Neither a grasshopper, nor split hooves. See picture below. Bird:* No mesora for Ashkenazim. For Sefardim, it would need simanim: Extant crop: Subject to observation of specimen. Peelable inner lining of gizzard: Subject ...


10

I would think not, because they probably wouldn't be kosher animals. The basic requirements for being a kosher animal are laid out in Deuteronomy 14:6: וְכָל בְּהֵמָה מַפְרֶסֶת פַּרְסָה וְשֹׁסַעַת שֶׁסַע שְׁתֵּי פְרָסוֹת מַעֲלַת גֵּרָה בַּבְּהֵמָה אֹתָהּ תֹּאכֵלוּ And every animal that has a split hoof and has a hoof cloven into two hoof ...


8

According to the CRC: Black, green, white, yellow, oolong, and jasmine tea are all inherently kosher for Pesach, but the issues of decaffeination and flavoring apply to tea in the same way that they apply to coffee. For that reason all decaffeinated tea and all flavored tea (which includes most herbal teas) should only be used on Pesach if they bear an ...


7

This only applies to the five grains: wheat, barley, oats, spelt, and rye. They all have the same cutoff date (16th of Nisan). Yoreh Deah 293


7

חמשה דברים חיבין בחלה, החטים והשעורים והכסמין ושבלת שועל ושיפון. הרי אלו חיבין בחלה, ומצטרפין זה עם זה, ואסורין בחדש מלפני הפסח, ומלקצור מלפני העמר. ואם השרישו קדם לעמר, העמר מתירן. ואם לאו, אסורין עד שיבוא העמר הבא.‏ Five [species] are obligated in Challah: chittah, se'orah, kusemet, shibbolet shu'al, and shifon. These are obligated in ...


7

Per CRC-Chicago All dental floss, including flavored, may be used. However, during pesach one should only use the unflavored variety.


5

According to Bikkores HaTalmud (Vienna, 1863, pp. 387-9), by Rabbi Yaakov Yechezkel HaLevi (cited by R Natan Slifkin here, page 10, and footnote 28), the "java mouse deer" is the shafan, which is classified as a non-kosher animal (Devarim 14:7). The same source posits that the "greater mouse deer" may be the arneves, which is also forbidden in the same ...


4

Let's see. What exactly are dinosaurs? For a long time, they have been considered lizards. Lizards are not kosher, due to lack of kosher signs. For the sake of argument, they might be mammals. In that case, they're still not kosher, as they don't have split hooves and chew their cud. (Also brought by Shokhet) What if they're birds? The Torah (Devarim ...


3

As observed in the comments -- egg farmers "candle" an egg by shining a bright light through it to check for blood spots. This works better with white eggs, which are more translucent than brown ones. So if you buy a dozen white eggs at the store, it's more likely they caught the blood spots at the factory and they didn't make it to the shelf. In short -- ...


2

The Rabbis taught that the prohibition of חדש (new grain) only applies to the five types of דגן (grain) that undergo חימוץ (fermentation): חטים, שעורים, כסמין, שבלת שועל, שיפון. Traditionally, these have been assumed to be wheat and barley which are mentioned explicitly in the Torah ("ארץ חטה ושעורה"), and spelt, oats, and rye, which the Rabbis said are ...


2

Find a good pair of reading glasses, a comfortable seat and a sense of humor ... made you laugh, already, huh? That was the technical part, because you did ask how to look ... Now, for the practical part or the answer: I would recommend a few strategies: If possible, stick with a place that is certified by a national or well-known kosher company, such as ...


2

I'm first just going to just copy from this essay by R. Gil Student (hope that's allowed): Ramban (Lev. 11:13) states that non-kosher animals are physically unhealthy. Rashbam (Lev. 11:3) agrees and Rambam (Moreh Nevukhim 3:48) offers this as a secondary reason for these [dietary] commands. However, Abarbanel (Lev. 11:13, p. 65) and Akeidas ...


1

The OU has an article addressing spots found in eggs. Of note, it says: Today, however, the only concerns are maris ayin or dam beitzim (a small amount of blood from a broken blood vessel in the hen, which is not forbidden). As a result, the entire egg is never assur and mei’ikar hadin removal of the blood spot would suffice ... Rav Moshe, however, ...


1

Here it says About 25-30% of brown eggs, irrespective of brand, typically have what are referred to as pigment or protein spots next to the yolk or floating in the albumen. If you look very closely at white eggs, you will see that they have similar particles of protein floating around, but the hens lack the brown pigment in their system that combines ...


1

This question was tweeted by @StackJudaism. I thought it was an interesting question, so I showed it to a friend of mine, as I'll often do with interesting tweets from both that account, as well as @mi_yodeya (which is run by people.) He answered, on the spot, that it wouldn't be a problem. He referred me to Ram"a to Shulchan Aruch, Yoreh De'ah 114, who ...


1

Note that many translations have both a bat and an ostrich listed as "birds". As an example, Rabbi Aryeh Levin in Living Torah and the English translator in Rav Hirsch (his grandson Isaac Levy) use Bas Haya'ana as ostrich and ataleif as bat. These translations state that both an ostrich and a bat are halachically considered "of". Thus it appears that a bird ...


1

Certainly, if there is a choice of non-gelatin capsules, they are preferable, though most poskim would allow one to take them: There is quite the machlokes (argument) as to gelatin capsules: The Israeli Rabbanut allow it for pills as not considered food - שלא כדרך אכילה. Other Poskim hold such capsules to be edible (כדרך אכילה) and thus should be avoided ...



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