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8

Extra watched: to make sure that no water touches it (except while it's being kneaded), because water is needed to start the fermentation process, which would make it chametz. The soul is connected to G-d, like a limb of the body is connected to the heart (for its blood supply) and the brain (for its functionality). "Cut off" means just that - that ...


7

It's of Biblical force and punishable as such, but yes we need to apply the Oral Law (namely one of Rabbi Yishamel's 13 principles) to spell it out. Rambam Laws of Prohibitions on Relations 4:3: ד,ג במה דברים אמורים שהטומאה תלויה בימים, בשטבלה במי מקוה אחר הימים הספורים. אבל נידה וזבה ויולדת שלא טבלו במי מקוה--הבא על אחת מהן, אפילו אחר כמה שנים--חייב ...


6

Rambam, Sanhedrin chapter 19 lists "every thou-shalt-not that has kares and has no death by court and for which one gets lashes" (twenty-one of them, including eating chametz on Pesach). He then lists eighteen sins for which people are "liable to death at the hands of God", implication being that they don't have kares, such as a non-kohen who ate t'ruma.


4

All such prohibitions are written twice - once as a warning, and the second time to give out the punishment. You see this with all the incestuous prohibitions very clearly. But things in the ten commandments are the same way. No punishments listed there, but the prohibition repeated later with the punishment. In fact, the Talmud will often ask, when it is ...


4

No. The most severe sins warrant the death penalty at the hands of a Sanhedrin if properly warned etc., such as murder and violating shabbos. I believe a subset of those can warrant Karet if done intentionally but unwitnessed. The next category warrant Karet as a maximum, such as violating Yom Kippur or relations with one's sister. A Sanhedrin could give ...


3

Most opinions hold that the Kares applies only to a Jewish man who has relations with a non-Jewish woman (see Shulchan Aruch Even HaEzer 16), however, there is one minority opinion that it even applies to a Jewish woman who has relations with a non-Jewish man and that is the opinion of Rabbeinu Avrohom HaGadol (quoted by the Shiltei HaGiborim to the Hagahos ...


1

It seems to me that the question is more about "Why does karet is described differently in different puskim?", rather than "are there different kinds of karet" (and a possible answer could be "since there are different kinds of karet"). Especially, when considering other karet descriptions, such as in Shmot 12:16: כִּי כָּל-אֹכֵל מַחְמֶצֶת, וְנִכְרְתָה ...



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