Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

10

It's of Biblical force and punishable as such, but yes we need to apply the Oral Law (namely one of Rabbi Yishamel's 13 principles) to spell it out. Rambam Laws of Prohibitions on Relations 4:3: ד,ג במה דברים אמורים שהטומאה תלויה בימים, בשטבלה במי מקוה אחר הימים הספורים. אבל נידה וזבה ויולדת שלא טבלו במי מקוה--הבא על אחת מהן, אפילו אחר כמה שנים--חייב ...


9

רמב"ם Hilchos Isurei Biah 4:4 writes הגויים--אין חייבין עליהם משום נידה Non-Jews – one is not culpable for violations of Niddah with them … However (although this wasn't the question), there is a non-Niddah Kares for relations with a non-Jew (h/t to DoubleAA) - Even HaEzer 16:2 הבא על העובדת כוכבים, אם לא פגעו בו קנאים ולא הלקוהו בית דין, הרי ...


8

Extra watched: to make sure that no water touches it (except while it's being kneaded), because water is needed to start the fermentation process, which would make it chametz. The soul is connected to G-d, like a limb of the body is connected to the heart (for its blood supply) and the brain (for its functionality). "Cut off" means just that - that ...


6

Rambam, Sanhedrin chapter 19 lists "every thou-shalt-not that has kares and has no death by court and for which one gets lashes" (twenty-one of them, including eating chametz on Pesach). He then lists eighteen sins for which people are "liable to death at the hands of God", implication being that they don't have kares, such as a non-kohen who ate t'ruma.


4

All such prohibitions are written twice - once as a warning, and the second time to give out the punishment. You see this with all the incestuous prohibitions very clearly. But things in the ten commandments are the same way. No punishments listed there, but the prohibition repeated later with the punishment. In fact, the Talmud will often ask, when it is ...


4

No. The most severe sins warrant the death penalty at the hands of a Sanhedrin if properly warned etc., such as murder and violating shabbos. I believe a subset of those can warrant Karet if done intentionally but unwitnessed. The next category warrant Karet as a maximum, such as violating Yom Kippur or relations with one's sister. A Sanhedrin could give ...


3

Most opinions hold that the Kares applies only to a Jewish man who has relations with a non-Jewish woman (see Shulchan Aruch Even HaEzer 16), however, there is one minority opinion that it even applies to a Jewish woman who has relations with a non-Jewish man and that is the opinion of Rabbeinu Avrohom HaGadol (quoted by the Shiltei HaGiborim to the Hagahos ...


3

To answer the first part of the question, the Rambam in the introduction to Chelek writes: והמקמה הגמורה היא שתכרת הנפש ותאבד ושלא יהיה לה קיום והוא הכרת האמור בתורה. וענין הכרת הכרתת הנפש ... וכל מי ששקע בתענוגות הגופניות והזניח את האמת והעדיף את השוא נכרת מאותו השגב וישאר חומר מוכרת בלבד וכבר ביאר הנביא שהעולם הבא אינו נישג בחושים הגופניים The ...


1

The Ramban on Vayikra 18:29 discusses three types of Kares. One is dying young, but retaining a portion in the world to come - both the spiritual world and the ultimate world of the Resurrection. The second is living a longer life, but losing the world of souls after death, but still retaining a portion in the Resurrection. (The Ramban - pace the Rambam - ...


1

These quotes deal with separate issues: touching a menstruating woman or laying down next to her makes one ritually impure. Having intercourse, whether standard or "back door" is punishable by being cut off from the people, but not death. Physical contact which is not standard or "back door" intercourse does not carry the penalty of being cut off - it ...


1

It seems to me that the question is more about "Why does karet is described differently in different puskim?", rather than "are there different kinds of karet" (and a possible answer could be "since there are different kinds of karet"). Especially, when considering other karet descriptions, such as in Shmot 12:16: כִּי כָּל-אֹכֵל מַחְמֶצֶת, וְנִכְרְתָה ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible