Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

8

The entire prayer, except for the last line, is in Aramaic. צלי, צלא, or צלו are different constructs of the word meaning "pray". צלותהון means "their prayers". As for the root, I believe it is likely correct that it is צלא, though a part of me wants to go digging in my old Aramaic text books to rule out the possibility that it is צלי. I have never heard ...


6

I have no source other than my teachers(' Mesorah?), but I was taught, and I believe, that it is proper for the חזן to wait until after the completion of the קדיש. It seems to me that, rather than waiting for praise, he is preventing distraction, and his presence and staid stance at the עמוד help to maintain the decorum through the last words of the קדיש.


6

Per Maariv quoting Chadrei Chadarim quoting Rabbi Shteinman Shlita there is no problem answering Amein if one says Kaddish on his dog. "האם מותר לענות אחרי קדיש כזה (לכלב), אמן ואמן יהא שמיה רבא?", נשאל הגראי"ל על ידי תלמידיו, בעקבות פנייה של אדם שביקש להגיד קדיש על כלבו שנפטר - כך על פי אתר האינטרנט החרדי בחדרי חרדים. הגראי"ל חייך והשיב: "הרי ...


5

The root of the word is צלי, which means "to turn" or "incline", and which has the sense of "pray" in many passages. For the former, see the Targum on Psalm 102:12 (where it corresponds to the Hebrew word of root נטה), and for the latter see Targum Onkelos on Genesis 12:8 (where it corresponds to the Hebrew word of root קרא). When it means "pray", it is ...


5

The Kitzur Shulchan Aruch in 15:6 states: Some say that one need not stand for Kaddish. However, any Kaddish which catches you standing, like after Hallel, one should [remain] standing until after [responding] Yehei Shmei Rabba. And some say that one should always stand for Kaddish and other Davar SheBiKedusha, since we should learn a Kal ...


4

While the Nishmas Yisrael (pg 469) believes that there is no issue, quoting the Maharshag (Teshuvah 2:40), he himself notes that if so one should be able to say kaddish without a quorum of ten. This seems to me to be an opinion that is very much in the minority, even though he himself seems to only think that R. Chaim Abulafia disagrees. Really though, the ...


3

"Wait until the Aron is closed" - I suspect it's for practical reasons; at some points in the services, people will sit down (e.g. Tachanun) at the next prayer, and they ideally should remain standing while the Aron is open, so we wait. Another practicality is you can offend the poor confused fellow who's been honored with closing the Aron by starting the ...


3

HaRav HaGaon Yakov Ariel says that he does not go back: לתשובות נוספות של הרה"ג יעקב אריאל שאלה: חזן שטעה ובמקום קדיש תתקבל אמר חצי קדיש, האם חוזר? ובחנוכה ור"ח שחל בחול אם טעה כדלעיל והתחילו לקרוא בתורה - כיצד ינהג?‏ תשובה: אינו חוזר.‏ Also see ...


3

According to Ask the Rabbi from Yeshivas Ohr Somayach: First he reviews the reasons that were mentioned in the question you referred to He (IMHO) seems to take a angle that says that the reason we don't say for the full 12 months even if we know the person was wicked is not to embarrass the deceased. Then he concludes: So, unless the parent ...


3

Literally stumbled upon this source last week: http://www.hebrewbooks.org/pdfpager.aspx?req=4199&st=&pgnum=454 and the following page 455 where the author [Rav Gedalia Felder, zt"l; Posek from Toronto, Ontario, Niftar in 1992] posits that the Drasha is not a Hefsek prior to Kaddish right before Musaf.


3

Kaf HaChaim 55:5 says that if there is no Minyan when starting Hodu (Nushach Sefardim) then when they arrive at Boruch Sheamar you can say Rabbi Chananya ben Akashya..... and say at that point the Kaddish D'Rabanan. He does not mention any other options or later locations where this kaddish may be said. In addition There may be a difference of opinion ...


3

I have been told by a Rabbi whom I greatly respect that he has permitted geirim, along with the Jewish son of a non-Jewish father and a Jewish mother, to say Kaddish for their non-Jewish parent(s). I believe that much of his reasoning was based on Kibbud Av v'Em (which continues to apply to one's non-Jewish parents even after conversion where one is ...


2

Qitzur Shulhhan Arukh - Yalqut Yosef, Siman 56:11 writes (my translation): מנהג האשכנזים כדעת הרמ''א, לעמוד בשעה שעונים קדיש וברכו, וספרדי שמתפלל עם אשכנזים, נכון שיעמוד גם הוא עמהם בעת אמירת קדיש וברכו, כדי שלא יהיה בכלל יושב בין העומדים. The Ashkenazi custom, per the ReM"A, is to stand when responding to Qaddish and Barekhu. And, as for a ...


2

From the Ben Ish Chai Parshas Vayachi : אות טו: … עוד נשאלתי שם בעשרה שלמדו תהלים ורוצים כלם לומר קדיש שאין שום אחד עונה והבאתי דברי הרב בני יאודה עייאש ז״ל סי׳ ג׳ והארכתי קצת בזה והעלתי דלכתחילה יזהרו להיות אחד עונה להם הקדיש׃ He cites the Bnei Yehuda Siman 3 who writes about this and says that in a case when all are saying kaddish and no one can ...


2

Aruch HaShulchan 55:4 says that the reason there are 2 Kaddish Yasoms at the end of Shacharis is due to the many Yesomim. (I would presume that only one person said each Kaddish, and this way more Yesomim were able to say a Kaddish at the Tefila).


2

The Rambam writes: This reckoning is not calculated [only] on the basis of the number of merits and sins, but also [takes into account] their magnitude. There are some merits which outweigh many sins as implied by [I Kings 14:13]: "Because in him, there was found a good quality." In contrast, a sin may outweigh many merits as [Ecclesiastes 9:18] states: ...


1

There is is a nice summation of the Laws of Kaddish on Chabad.org Paragraphs 3–4 seem relevant to your question (emphasis added): The period that the mourner recites the Kaddish for parents is, theoretically, a full calendar year. The deceased is considered to be under Divine judgment for that period. Some communities, therefore, adhere to the ...


1

Mi rabbi, Rabi Michael Perets, shlita, who has written many books on halacha, has said that a person who has to say kaddish may say some in advance or otherwise "repay" them when he can. He states that a person is only obligated to say three each day, so if a person may lose two on a plane trip he could try to say 5 the previous day of his trip. I know that ...


1

The following is taken from the sefer הקדיש here: It is called Kaddish D'Rabanan because it was instituted to be said after learning Torah Sheba'al Peh which was transmitted to the Rabbis. (כנה"ג א"ח ס' קנח) And this is what the Rambam says: Whenever there are ten or more Jews who are involved in learning Torah Sheba'al Peh, even Midrashim or ...


1

Great sourcing, Double AA! Just translating them here... OC 56:1 has the Bet Yosef (followed as the great decisor by Sephardic communities) not enunciating a preference for standing during Kaddish. The Rema (Ashkenazic custom) then interjects that "it is proper for one to stand when they answer Kaddish & all matters of [special] Holiness." Be'er Hatav ...


1

The Magen avraham and other poskim write that the maharil would only stand if he was standing up to the point of kadish,but if he was sitting he would stay that way, and so was the minhag of the arizal. It is good to note that the poskim are more machmir by kadish tiskabel since it is a essential part of the davening. The mishna berurah writes that according ...


1

There are some who believe responding "amen" and "y'hay shmay rahbah..." in response to the Kaddish is one of the most essential aspects of prayer. In honor of this it would be logical to stand. (Of course, one could say the same for Shema Yisroel, the basic declaration of faith, during which we don't always stand!) Art Scroll's Mesorah Series "Kaddish" ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible