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The Kitzur Shulchan Aruch in סימן טו - דיני קדיש וברכו וצרוף עשרה says that as long as there are at least 6 people actually answering, you may say Kaddish, as long as there are 10 adult males above Bar Mitzva awake in the room - even if 1, 2, 3 or 4 of them are forbidden from answering kaddish at that moment. סעיף ז': אִם אֵין ט' שׁוֹמְעִין לְהַשְּׁלִיחַ ...


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See here: Siddur Admur [omitted in Shulchan Aruch]; Shaar Hakavanos 190; Peri Eitz Chaim Shaar R”H 7; Kaf Hachaim 582/15; M”E 582/1 and 22 The reason: The Gematria of Hashalom is the same as Safriel Hamalach which is the angel which writes the Jews in the book of life during Aseres Yimei Teshuvah. [Peri Eitz Chaim ibid brought in Kaf Hachaim ...


4

Orach Chaim (132,2) in Rema writes that the Kadish Yasom is reserved for a yasom (i.e.one mourning a parent first 11 months). However, if there is no yasom anyone without a father and mother should say it and even one with parents can say it if his parents don't mind his saying that Kadish.


4

From an Ohr Same'ach ask the Rabbi article http://ohr.edu/ask_db/ask_main.php/10/Q1/ Ideally the closest relative should say it. If there are none, a close friend, or in the case of a noted rav, one of his students. Technically, anyone can volunteer to say it. In many synagogues I have attended, the rabbi is always saying Kaddish for someone who either has ...


4

The proper way to do it would be to sa kaddish according to the nussach of the shul. The reason for that being, that "al titosh metoras imecha" does not apply when davining in such a shul (at least for the things you need a minjan for, for everything else one is allowed to follow ones own nussach). There is also a Gemore in Pesachim 52 "al yeschaneh adam ...


4

One may not interrupt the amida to recite kaddish if one is in the middle of the amida. Rather, one should pause and silently (and attentively) listen to the person who is reciting the kaddish and fulfill his obligation thereby (Shulchan Aruch OC 104:7). After the word yisbarach (after amein y'hei sh'meih rabba), one should continue with his amida and not ...


4

The Nusach is from the Rambam סדר תפילות כל השנה - נסח הקדיש where he says: עשֶֹׁה שָׁלוֹם בִּמְרוֹמָיו הוּא בְרַחֲמָיו יַעֲשֶׂה שָׁלוֹם עָלֵינוּ וְעַל כָּל יִשְׂרָאֵל אָמֵן.‏ The Behr Siddur, pg. 131 (Siddur Avodath Yiroel, without footnotes from Yitzchok ben Aryeh Yosef Dov, printed by Rodelheim, 1868) it says: "It's from the Rambam and in all ...


3

I have seen Nusach Ashkenaz siyum reciters say "Veyatzmach". According to this article, it seems appropriate for everyone to say it. There are 5 types of Kaddish and the one recited at the end of a siyum is the same one recited at a burial. It is called Kaddish Hagadol. The article states: The final type of Kaddish (Kaddish Hagadol) is recited on two ...


3

Chabad.org gives the normative view of kaddish (my emphasis) While Kaddish is commonly known as the "mourners prayer," a reading of the text reveals that it is not about death or mourning, but the public proclamation of G-d's greatness. By rising from the depths of anguish and loss to offer praise to G-d, we transform the event of death into an ...


3

Excerpt from this article: To avoid fights, many places allow all the Avelim (mourners) to say Kaddish (prayer said on behalf of the deceased) together. However, they must say it together word-for-word, for two voices saying the same thing in unison are not heard, except for something heard infrequently that is very dear to the listener. Kaddish ...


3

The Kitzur Shulchan Aruch in סימן כו - דיני קדיש יתום says: סעיף ט"ז: מִי שֶׁהוּא אָבֵל עַל אָבִיו, וְגַם עַל אִמּוֹ, מִכָּל מָקוֹם, אֵין לוֹ זְכוּת יוֹתֵר בִּתְפִלּוֹת וְקַדִּישִׁים מִשְּׁאָר אָבֵל, מִשּׁוּם דְּזִכָּרוֹן אֶחָד עוֹלֶה לְכָאן וּלְכָאן. (כנ"י) ועַיֵּן נוב"ה סִימָן ה. So as far as parents are concerned, one Kaddish covers both of them.


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Siddur Hagaonim Vhamikubalim - page 55 gives the following reasons regarding the end of the Amida. A: Mateh Moshe 795 - Since this is a time of judgement, and there is no judgement in charity and no charity in judgement the regular Nusach is inappropriate. However by saying Oseh HaShalom we are saying that the place of judgement is peaceful as the verse in ...


3

Kaddish is said as a merit for the deceased to shield him from the judgement of Gehinnom. If the deceased were not required to undergo such judgment (e.g. he was a complete tzadik) Kaddish would not be necessary, but is nevertheless said even for a child once he reached the age of understanding what a sin is. (Mourning in Halacha 39:29-30) based on Sdei ...


2

AFAIK, the mourner is temporarily the Shaliach Tzibbur while saying Kaddish -- in a sense, he is taking over for the Chazzan -- and the t'filah is not complete until Kaddish is said. Hence, the Chazzan should stand where he was and answer Kaddish just like the rest of the tzibbur -- just as it is not ideal for any member of the tzibbur to remove his talis ...


2

Mishna Berura writes (46:2) that the correct pronunciation is with a צירי, making it "yisgadeil v'yiskadeish." The reason he gives for that is that even though kaddish is in Aramaic (which would imply yisgadal, apparently), these two words are meant to be in Hebrew. This phrase is based on a verse (Yechezkel 38:23), which uses the phrase "והתגדלתי והתקדשתי" ...


2

FWIW, there are some cases, e.g., in מודים, where even if one is not saying it one must bow along with everyone else, so as not to appear to disagree with what is being said (נראה ככופר). Source is in משנה ברורה and ערוך השלחן, both in אורח חיים, סימן ק״ט: ערוך השלחן: ...שצריך לשחות עם הציבור ב"מודים", שלא יהא נראה ככופר למי שהציבור משתחוים לו ...


2

I'm "extraplocombing" (extrapolating and combining) the answers from your referenced question regarding Shacharit with Mishnah Brura 232:2. See Sha'arei Tzion #4, who points out that since Ma'ariv is reshut (not obligatory) we are not as concerned about the requirement of smichat g'ulah litfilah (loose translation - connecting the concept of redemption as ...


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Summary: You do say 'Amen' when listening only live through a telephone or simulcast (dont think the medium makes a difference). You however arent yotze a mitzvah if you do it this way. Taken from here Rabbi Eli Mansour Likewise, if a person listens to a live broadcast of a Shiur via telephone, radio or a live feed over the internet, and Kaddish is ...


2

In an analogous case (where three scrolls are used, one for the first six aliyos, another for the seventh, then kadish, then the third scroll for maftir), the Shaare Efrayim (10:12) says one "need not" ("א״צ") put the first scroll near the second and third when saying kadish. He sort-of implies that the same is true in your case of chol hamoed Pesach (since ...


2

I have been to many (Nusach Ashkenaz) siyums, and have never heard the person say "VaYitzmach..." The siyums that I have been to include by alumnus of YU, Chofetz Chayim, and Lakewood. All are predominantly Nusach Ashkenaz. I wonder if it is because you are in Eretz Yisrael where Nusach Sefarad is common that you have seen this written. The Koren Talmud ...


2

As Double AA says A davar shebekdusha (lit. thing done in holiness) is any ritual that requires a minyan to be done. I understand this to mean that performing a davar shebekdusha without a minyan means that the activity has not been effective. Or as Ohr.edu 's Ask the Rabbi says Kaddish is the public sanctification of G-d's Name. If kaddish is ...


2

You asked: What about at the end of the day? The Kitzur Shulchan Aruch in סימן כו - דיני קדיש יתום says: סעיף כ"א: מִי שֶׁהָיָה לוֹ יָאהרְצַיְיט, וְלֹא [הָיָה] יָכוֹל לוֹמַר קַדִּישׁ, כְּגוֹן, שֶׁהָיָה בַּדֶּרֶךְ, אוֹ שֶׁלֹּא הִגִּיעַ לוֹ קַדִּישׁ, יָכוֹל לוֹמַר קַדִּישׁ בִּתְפִלַּת עַרְבִית שֶׁלְּאַחַר הַיָּאהרְצַיְיט. ‏ So it's documented that ...


1

When I started saying kaddish for my mother many years ago, I asked the same question of my rabbi. His response was it was up to me. I established the custom for myself to say the kaddish d'rabbanan following the brief Torah study between mincha and maariv both on the eve of the yahrzeit (when the yahrzeit started with maariv) and at the conclusion of the ...


1

The new Oz Vehadar gemorahs put these words in brackets.


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Orach Chaim 132:2 Rama says that one can say Kadish Yasom after Aleinu even if he has parents, so long that his parents do not care. However I do not know of any source for saying it at other intervals besides after Aleinu.


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Anyone can say kaddish if they have at least one deceased parent, or if they have permission from their living parents. In a synagogue with no mourners, they'll usually have someone say at least one kaddish (usually the one after Aleinu). I had a teacher who lost a parent relatively early in life; years later, he was working at one yeshiva that asked him to ...


1

Kaddish is part of the laws of mourning, which weren't instituted for the loss of an unborn child. (In fact, if a baby was born with severe medical problems and left this world soon after entering it, most rabbis would advise against shiva, kaddish, and the remaining mourning rituals.) It's a sad and difficult situation, especially without the usual ...


1

Kaddish is usually said for someone for whom there is an obligation to sit shiva An unborn child or a child less than 30 days old there in no shiva, they under the halachic classification of a "nephel" ie. a non viable baby, meaning the baby was not considered alive in the utmost halachic sense (although its death does require a full jewish burial, see Avoda ...



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