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15

It's something like that, based on my observations of my local Reform and Conservative communities. What I notice in particular with the Conservative daily minyan is that there are some regulars, some people who just come to say kaddish, and some people who initially came to say kaddish (for a month or for a year; I don't mean one day) and then stuck around. ...


7

I wholly agree with Monica's excellent answer, but I would like to point out another phenomenon. Many non-Orthodox Jews go through a portion of their adult lives without giving much thought to religious practice. A traumatic event like the death of a parent can cause them to re-evaluate their lives. They may see the end of the long chain of familial ...


4

The Shulchan Aruch says that one should not answer to kaddish or kedusha in the middle of amidah. He says that one should stop praying, listen and lechaven and that will be as though one answered. In Pninei Halacha Rabbi Eliezer Melamed brings sources that some say that doing so would constitute a hefsek. His conclusion is that one should wait and listen, ...


3

The minimum requirement for kaddish is to say it once at any one of the three minyonim. If a person cannot attend any of the three minyonim on a particular day, he cannot "make it up" on a different day. Chabad.org (shown below) recommends that one learn or give tzedakah or emphasize a mitzvah in honor of the deceased parent. This can help in the event that ...


3

What Monica said in her answer is completely true. I would like to suggest another possible reason for this phenomenon. The reason is practicality. Orthodox Jews tend to live in clusters. Due to the diversity of "streams" of Orthodox Judaism (each one wanting to have their own shtieble), there are often clusters of many Orthodox synagogues within a small ...


2

The Kaddish d'Rabannan is one of the seven kaddishes that are obligatory like is found in Shulchan Aruch HaRav, Orach Chaim, 55:1. http://hebrewbooks.org/pdfpager.aspx?req=25072&st=&pgnum=224 The particular text of Kaddish d'Rabbanan is said in response to the public recitation of a part of the oral Torah. Based on Sotah 49a, since the destruction ...


1

I think the answer is in your words, and that your assumption that "the smichut is not geulah based in mincha" is not accurate. It is true that the main and important smichut is in the morning prayers, but as the Shulchan Aruch says (92, 2): לא יעמוד להתפלל אלא באימה והכנעה לא מתוך שחוק וקלות ראש ודברים בטלים ולא מתוך כעס אלא מתוך שמחה כגון דברי תנחומין ...



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