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Basically, in unusual instances of seeming grammatical mismatches in the Bible, a linguistic phenomenon called “attraction” has likely occurred. This phenomenon occurs in many languages, including English. An example in English of linguistic “attraction” – a technical grammatical mismatch – is: “Turn left at the street where there is a carwash and a fast ...


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From: http://m.chabad.org/dailystudy/tanya.asp?tDate=3/4/2015 The word translated “in its Maker” (בעושיו) shares a common root with עשיה, the lowest level of creation. With this abode in particular ought Israel rejoice, knowing that G‑d’s joy is especially great when the creations in Asiyah, the very lowest world, become an abode for Him. וזה שכתוב: ...


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It seems that the Chabad translation is a mistake. The verse in Job literally says "my makers". Similarly, the verse in Kohelet says "your (singular) creators". However, we do find that God is referred to using the plural, and we understand it as the singular. For example, most instances of אלהים in Tanakh refer to God, and they take a singular verb (eg. ...


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The word used in Job is "Osai," which is the object-form for the verb "Osainu" and distinct from "Osi." The latter is "My Maker," the former is "Our Maker." The one in Koheles is also translated the same way. Due to word constructs in Hebrew, you can have words that are object plural, subject plural, or both. There is no "plurality of gods/makers" being ...



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