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17

There's no sin in translating Jewish texts (nowadays, at least). I have no source for saying so, but there's evidence in the vast amount of Jewish literature that has been translated into various languages. However: People sometimes can't be bothered to translate, especially because of the remaining reasons (below). Some words are very hard to translate ...


15

I have no time to read the article - and therefore do not endorse anything they write. The Rabbis instituted that Holy Books like a Sefer Torah would defile the hands. Why? Because people would keep their Teruma (tithes to be given to the Cohen) with their Holy Books. This was to prevent their Teruma from becoming Tameh (impure). The rationale was the ...


12

I have a (paper) book called אמרי מדריך that seems to be what you're looking for. It highlights the shoresh, showing the other letters in outline, and it includes letters from the shoresh which were dropped in conjugation in minuscule type. The book is entirely in Hebrew and I can't read the introduction, so I don't know what other notational conventions ...


9

The answer is there are few if any Biblical references. The afterlife is more emphasized in the oral tradition than in the actual Bible. Which is why you had the sadduccees (the priestly Jews who only believed in the first five books of the Bible with no oral tradition) who did not believe in an afterlife at all. To this day there are still many Jews who are ...


8

The Sma"k (written by Isaac ben Joseph of Corbeil) is an abridged version of the Sma"g (written by Moses ben Jacob of Coucy) including additional agaddic and ethical material. Cited here for instance. See also here p. 9 The Sma"k is based on the Sma"g but targets a wider audience, to this effect it includes few sources and focuses on the final ...


8

The Beit Yosef there is referring to חלק י״ח, section 18, of Rabbeinu Yerocham's discussion of the laws of Shabbat in his Sefer Toledot Adam veChavah, Adam, Netiv 12. Thus, בחי״ח stands for בחלק י״ח.


7

As mentioned above, there aren't any general prohibitions (per se) on translating Jewish texts into the vernacular, be it English, French, Russian, Yiddish, etc. Regarding Text on This Site Many posts and answers here are among those for whom Hebrew is not a foreign language. Many of this site's users know each other (at least virtually) and are aware of ...


7

Deut. 7:11 states: "You shall observe the commandment, and the decrees, and the ordinances, that I command you, today, to perform them." The Torah writes about Earthly rewards, and not a lot about the world to come (afterlife) or the resurrection (see further in Deut. Ch.7:12-etc.) One reason for this is the word "today" in Deut.7:11. The Torah is meant ...


7

Keset HaSofer, by R Shlomo Ganzfried, discusses the laws of writing as a Sofer STaM. Topics include: how to make Kosher parchment, shapes of the letters, intent when writing, what sorts of corrections are permitted, prohibition of erasing God's name (among other things). Online at Hebrewbooks.org here. Minchat Shai, by R Yedidya Nortzi, discusses the ...


7

Hovos HaLevavos / Kitab ul-Hidayah ila Fara'idh il-Qulub, as edited by the scholoar A S Yahuda, is available here: https://archive.org/details/alhidjailfarida00yahugoog A S Yahuda's edition is in Arabic script. Before that edition, the book was usually (or, I think, always) copied and read in Hebrew script. You can buy an edition in that format, as edited ...


6

I found an article by Yaakov Levinger (על הספר 'ביאור שמות קדש וחול' המיוחס לרמב"ם, מחקרי ירושלים במחשבת ישראל ד) which addresses this sefer. He notes that Prof. Saul Lieberman, R. Menachem Mendel Kasher, and others considered the work to be authentic, however, he considers it to clearly be a forgery. His proofs are: in this work, the "Rambam" identifies ...


5

I didn't find a good source for this information, so we (at Sefaria.org) analyzed our text, did some pattern recognition, corrected by hand, double checked, and came up with an authoritative mapping between the Mishnah and the Babylonian Talmud. Line numbers here refer to the segmentation in Sefaria's online Talmud.


5

Minhagei Lita (Customs of Lithuanian Jewry) by Rabbi Menachem Mendel Poliakoff.


5

ArtScroll has a book titled "The Fifth Commandment" that sounds like it might be what you're looking for.


5

There are many series of such books, a few I like are R Daniel Mann from Eretz Hemda has a very nice series called Living the halachic process (also available one of them also available on Kindle) - you can sample some online as part of the OU Vebbe Rebbe series (I cannot find the table of contents, try varying the number in the URL) R Ari Enkin has ...


4

The Derashot Ha-Ran (no. 11) has a famous discussion of the two types of government in the Torah; in general the Abarbanel's commentary on Tanakh contains many important discussions of political ideas (for example, his discussion of monarchy in Devarim 17); Simone Luzzatto, a 17th century Venetian rabbi, wrote a book defending the rights of the Jews of ...


4

This is discussed at length in the hakdamah to the Mosad R' Kook Ritva, and in R' Avrohom Shoshana's Ritva published by Ofeq Institute. In brief, the old Ritva acc. to some is ר' כרשכש. The new one acc. to some is Ritva, acc. to R' Shoshanah it's mostly the Ramah with some others. It's more complicated than that, but that's the Cliff Notes answer.


4

While the Hebrew language is indeed considered Holy, it is not the reason most things are not translated on this site. In my opinion, it has to do with the assumptions of the writer. Assumptions Possible Assumption #1: That if you are asking a very specific questions, then you must be knowledgeable enough to read or translate for yourself the specific ...


4

HebrewBooks has the volumes of R. Ashlag's edition , which includes translation of the Aramaic into Hebrew. Type "הסולם" into the site's 'Title' search box to get the list of volumes.


4

I believe this is a work by Rabbi Binyamin Kazis on the Semag available here (note: the print is from the 18th century). The page in question on lavin 258 can be viewed here. The beginning of it is the following:


4

Some passages that are understood by some to refer to personal resurrection include: Isaiah 26:19: Oh, let Your dead revive! Let corpses arise! Awake and shout for joy, You who dwell in the dust!— For Your dew is like the dew on fresh growth; You make the land of the shades come to life. Job 19:25-27: But I know that my Vindicator ...


4

Yes, at least for some non-Lubavitch, non-Breslov people. The proof is from the myriad great Torah scholars who cannot reasonably be described as Lubavitch or Breslov but who quote their books. As just one example, Mishna B'rura extensively cites the Shulchan Aruch of the first Lubavitcher rebbe.


4

R. David Cohen (of Cong. Gvul Yaavetz in Brooklyn) has a series of seforim consisting of unanswered questions titled ואם תאמר (I-IV, V, VI). The author of the Chelkas Yoav has a book of (103) unanswered questions called קבא דקשייתא.


3

When the Tanya was first published in book form (1796), the first 2 sections were released. In a later printing (1806), the Baal HaTanya added a version of the 3rd section (it was later updated). The final two sections were added to the Tanya posthumously, by the Author's children. - Starting from about minute 4 of this lecture. Prior to its publishing in ...


3

On Judaism and Jewish thought I recommend: Living Jewish: The Lore and Law of the Practicing Jew, by Michael Asheri The Book of Jewish Belief by Louis Jacobs Nine Questions People Ask About Judaism, by Dennis Prager On the the Jewish roots of Christianity: Jews and Christians: The Myth of a Common Tradition by Jacob Neusner Judaism and Christianity: A ...


3

I answered this question to a larger extent here, using this article from R J J Schachter (I read the article years ago - it is wonderful). To quote the reasons most relevant to this question Some formulations of the original herem are phrased "if [the recipient] threw away the letter it is permitted [to read it]" R Hayim Palaggi states the herem ...


3

You've indicated interest in 1) limmud Halakhah be'iyun (i.e. in-depth Halakhah study), 2) mussar (i.e. character development), 3) parashah study, 4) mysticism and 5) biographies (in that order, unless I'm mistaken). As such, I personally recommend the following books 1, 2: Halakhah (chronological): Mishneh Torah (HaRaMBa"M) Shulḥan 'Arukh (Maran HaRav ...


3

Since the bathroom usage had just occurred and needs to be handled, and a bracha should be made as close as possible to the action that requires it, logic would indicate that it should be done first. Additionally, one becomes obligated immediatel upon using the bathroom no matter how minimal the usage. One is not necessarily obligated to say the bracha ...


3

You can add the Shem MiShmuel by Rabbi Shmuel Bornsztain, the second Sochatchover Rebbe, to your list. Also, the Maharal MiPrague predates Hassidism but has been described as a forefather of Chassidus in terms of machshavic thought. (I believe he heavily influenced Rav Tzadok.) He has works related to many of the moadim including Gevurot Hashem on Pesach, ...


3

This 17 volume set covers everything you're looking for. Each sefer covers both halacha, customs and Chassidic insights as explained by the Lubavitcher Rebbe. There are extensive footnotes to look up original sources. http://store.kehotonline.com/prodinfo.asp?number=HRE-SHAAM.S This second set, Nitai Gavriel, is not specifically Chassidut. It is Halacha. ...



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