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7

There is a sefer called Otzar Roshei Teivos - see it here and there is an older sefer with the same name that I can't find online, but probably your average Jewish book store would be able to get it for you. (Asuming you aren't needing to look these up when near a computer and want a small sefer for reference. The older sefer is smaller than the one I ...


7

There is a Sefer Halacha Pesuka (Volume 1 & Volume 2) on Yoreh Deah. If you compare the references in the Kaf Hachayim YD 75 to the Halacha Pesuka 2:75 you will see that the references matches.


6

See here (search for the word Reishis) where the Lubavitcher Rebbe specifically instructs the Choson to learn the relevant section regarding marital behavior right before the wedding. This was written to many different ones over several years, and is regarded as part of the standard wedding preparations in Chabad now.


6

The difficulty of the Biur ha-Gra as an impediment to its study was noted immediately with its publication. In the introduction to his Taklin Chadatin (Minsk, 1812), R. Yisrael of Shklov already noted the necessity for a commentary on the Biur ha-Gra: "לזה צריך חיבור בפני עצמו יותר ויותר מחיבור הפרי מגדים על המגינים". But this need has gone largely ...


6

I was, for a while, unofficially in charge of my synagogue's library, and we had it organized as follows (as well as I can recall). The guiding principle was that things should be where people will look for them. Sidurim for daily use had their own section. (Sections, really, in more than one place in the room.) The non-standard ones, not used by most ...


6

There are 4192 Mishnayos. Source: The back of the משניות set that's called משנה סדורה. See this online downloadable version.


5

--Birkas Eliyahu (ברכת אליהו) is a multi-volume work on Biur HaGra which is available for free on hebrewbooks.org --there is also damesek eliezer דמשק אליעזר which is a commentary to the biur hagra. -- there is also a commentary to biur hagra written by a Rosh Kollel in Landers College, but I don't remember his name or the name of his sefer.


5

Having worked in the Jewish Publishing Industry for a number of years, I can tell you that it is common practice to use approbations on partial manuscripts, or even for other books written by the same author, or even just a letter attesting to the author's reliability. There are no real guidelines. I have seen haskamot from Rabbis who passed away before the ...


5

Strongly recommend Rabbi Aryeh Kaplan's books. (His Torah translation is superb and also available online). "If You were God" is great for theology; "The Real Messiah" addresses Judaism's views towards Christianity.


5

I think the premise of this question is mistaken, for a few reasons: If the question is why the Shulchan Aruch itself does not codify a list of beliefs, the answer is that the Shulchan Aruch is not comprehensive (it does not have many important areas of bein adam le-chavero either, e.g., lashon hara. This doesn't mean that they aren't obligatory.) If the ...


5

It's called שערי צבי - "Shaarey Tzvi" written by Rav Tzvi Rotter shlit"a (he is the son of the Shaaray Aharon). The book can be found here and can be partially viewed here. Hat tip to sam regarding another book with the same premise, ילקוט מלכו של עולם - "Yalkut Malko Shel Olam", information about it can be found here.


4

Wikipedia. As described there, Neusner has been criticized by the following scholars in his field of study: [Shaye J. D. Cohen, "Jacob Neusner, Mishnah and Counter-Rabbinics," Conservative Judaism, Vol.37(1) Fall 1983 p. 48-63] [Craig A. Evans, "Mishna and Messiah 'In Context'," Journal of Biblical Literature, (JBL), 112/2 1993, p. 267-289] ...


4

The Shulchan Aruch came about, because its author, Rav Yosef Karo, declared that the era of the Rishonim has ended, and one can no longer make halachic decisions based on one's interpretations of the Gemara, but rather on the basis of the interpretations and rulings of the Rishonim (the Halachic authorities of the several hundred years before his time). ...


4

This is a bit of a side point, but I think it really is a crucial aspect of organizing a useful shul library. If you want the library to have lasting value, you need to have a system in place for maintaining its order. If there is no such system, then people's use of the library (hopefully robust!) will result in increasing disorder over time, eliminating a ...


4

I emailed R' Jeremy Meyerowitz, a Public Services Librarian at the JTS Library, and he provided the following information (edited for format and link styling): I would recommend the website of the Association of Jewish Libraries (AJL). They have many resources to help different types of Jewish Libraries, including, shul libraries. They also have a ...


4

Here are some characteristics of the different translations/editions: Common Re-Print of European Edition This is ibn Tibbon's translation, but with many typos in the text. ibn Tibbon strove for word-to-word correspondence with the Arabic: makes the language very strange and off-putting to someone not used to it. But has its own charm when you get used ...


4

Some of this was summarized in a previous answer here. There are many opinions about this stuff, by the way. Rabbi Yehuda Herzl Henkin's Bnei Banim 4:16 is a MUST READ. It addresses the halachic angle on some of these matters, while Rabbi Aharon Lichtenstein's "Of Marriage: Relationship and Relations" (Tradition 39:2) addresses the "hashkafic" ...


4

As Noach has pointed out, Tom. stands for Latin "tomus", volume, thus you have volume one of a mahzor, or holiday prayer book. The Schlesingers were a well-known Austro-Hungarian family whose printing firm specialized in printing prayerbooks (see here and here). If you can post a scan of the title page we will be able to tell you more about it and what it ...


3

So long as you aren't erasing the text, recording content-related notes in a text's margins is a very traditional Jewish practice. Consider this page from a very old Tanakh:


3

There is a sefer called Bereishis Rabbasi which was written either by Rav Moshe HaDarshan or one of his students. He is also quoted in many places in Pirush HaRokeach Al HaTorah and Tosafos HaShalem Al HaTorah (things which are not quoted by Rashi).


3

There's a famous story that the Baal Shem Tov encountered Moshiach and asked him when he would finally come -- "when your wellsprings of Torah are spread out there." So I would see this as trying to fulfill that mission. A recent Israeli postage stamp commemorated 200 years since the death of Rabbi Shneur Zalman of Liadi, the 1st Lubavitcher Rebbe and ...


3

The Ish Masliah version would probably be what you're looking for. It brings when the Kaf HaHaim disagrees with the M"B, when Hacham Ovadia and also Rav Moshe Lewi disagree as well. As well as many other great features Here it is online for around 90$.


3

First, some background information: Allegedly, Israel ben Eliezer Baal Shem wrote a letter to his brother in law wherein he states that on Rosh HaShanah of 5507 (1746), he spiritually ascended to the "Chamber of Moshiach" and has a conversation with the future mashiah. In the course of the conversation, the mashiah supposedly tells him that "When your ...


3

Libraries vary significantly from shul to shul based on the congregation but there are some standards that are common across the board and which would be missed if anyone tried to use the shul library for studying. Siddurim. These aren't really part of the library, but a basic necessity because most of your congregation will want something to pray out of. ...


3

For the same reason that the Zohar is attributed to R. Shimon Bar Yochai. The last section of Sefer Yetzira says, or implies that Abraham was the teacher of these principles in the Sefer Yetzira. Chapter 1 section 3 reads: The ten numbers formed from nothing are the Decad: these are seen in the fingers of the hands, five on one, five on the other, ...


3

Mesilas Yesharim is written as steps in a ladder. Meaning, you have to work on every attribute before going on to the next and when you do, you reach a new level. In regard to the order of learning his other seforim I say as follows. In the introduction to Mesillas Yesharim, the Ramchal talks a lot about Olam Haba as mans goal. In Derech Hashem, he ...


2

http://he.wikipedia.org/wiki/%D7%A4%D7%A1%D7%A7%D7%99_%D7%AA%D7%95%D7%A1%D7%A4%D7%95%D7%AA Per Rabbi Yaakov Emden in his Sefer Mishna Lechem Pesachim Chapter 10 it was authored by Rabbi Yaakov ben Asher - the Tur. There are those who attribute it to the Tur's father - the Rosh. The Chida in Shem HaGedolim questions as to what the source is that it was ...


2

Rabbi Ephraim Oshry's son is the Rov in a shul in my neighborhood. He told me a short time ago that the family was working on republishing his father's works. I don't know what the schedule is but I assume you can contact him directly to find out. The shul is Khal Beth Avrohom on East 17th Street in Brooklyn.


2

Yaakov Rosanes at Virtual Geula has a list of all active Israeli publishers of seforim as well as a lits of inactive publishers linked at the bottom of that page. If you are searching for rare or hard to find books that is the place to go.


2

Some children's siddurim leave a lot of space for writing, This Artscroll leaves more room than most other siddurim http://www.artscroll.com/Books/scha.html I am sure if you go into a seforim store and look in their siddurim aisle, there would be more editions of a children's siddur with even more room.



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