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15

There's no sin in translating Jewish texts (nowadays, at least). I have no source for saying so, but there's evidence in the vast amount of Jewish literature that has been translated into various languages. However: People sometimes can't be bothered to translate, especially because of the remaining reasons (below). Some words are very hard to translate ...


15

I have no time to read the article - and therefore do not endorse anything they write. The Rabbis instituted that Holy Books like a Sefer Torah would defile the hands. Why? Because people would keep their Teruma (tithes to be given to the Cohen) with their Holy Books. This was to prevent their Teruma from becoming Tameh (impure). The rationale was the ...


12

Quick-Reference List of the Section-Contents of Igros Moshe - אגרות משה All links are to the first page of the section on HebrewBooks.org. The end of each volume has, for each of the responsa sections, a list of "references from Shas and Posekim" and a table of contents with responsa numbers, titles, and page numbers. Links to these are included below ...


10

Sefer Chasidim 923 says that if 2 Seforim fell on the ground, one should pick up both Seforim prior to kissing the first one. Aruch Hashulchan Yore Deah 282:11 also mentions kissing a Sefer that fell on the floor.


8

The answer is there are few if any Biblical references. The afterlife is more emphasized in the oral tradition than in the actual Bible. Which is why you had the sadduccees (the priestly Jews who only believed in the first five books of the Bible with no oral tradition) who did not believe in an afterlife at all. To this day there are still many Jews who are ...


8

The Sma"k (written by Isaac ben Joseph of Corbeil) is an abridged version of the Sma"g (written by Moses ben Jacob of Coucy) including additional agaddic and ethical material. Cited here for instance. See also here p. 9 The Sma"k is based on the Sma"g but targets a wider audience, to this effect it includes few sources and focuses on the final ...


7

This illustration appeared on a number of texts from the period: it was the printers' mark of the Bragadini brothers, who for a time (and together with Bomberg) held a virtual monopoly on the publication of Jewish books in Venice. As to whether or not you consider it halakhically sound, bear in mind that (like Bomberg) they weren't Jewish. That same ...


7

Hebrewbooks.org has a book with that title by R Shlomo Zalman Mirkash containing the ruling you reference about women and counting the Omer (available here).


7

Rabbi Ribiat's "39 Melochos" that you mention is lucid, comprehensive, and well-sourced, yet is also broken down into very digestible bites, which is why it has become so popular in the English-speaking world. (We've often used it as a basis for table discussions.) He begins sections with more general basic background pieces before he gets into more detailed ...


7

Keset HaSofer, by R Shlomo Ganzfried, discusses the laws of writing as a Sofer STaM. Topics include: how to make Kosher parchment, shapes of the letters, intent when writing, what sorts of corrections are permitted, prohibition of erasing God's name (among other things). Online at Hebrewbooks.org here. Minchat Shai, by R Yedidya Nortzi, discusses the ...


7

Hovos HaLevavos / Kitab ul-Hidayah ila Fara'idh il-Qulub, as edited by the scholoar A S Yahuda, is available here: https://archive.org/details/alhidjailfarida00yahugoog A S Yahuda's edition is in Arabic script. Before that edition, the book was usually (or, I think, always) copied and read in Hebrew script. You can buy an edition in that format, as edited ...


6

As mentioned above, there aren't any general prohibitions (per se) on translating Jewish texts into the vernacular, be it English, French, Russian, Yiddish, etc. Regarding Text on This Site Many posts and answers here are among those for whom Hebrew is not a foreign language. Many of this site's users know each other (at least virtually) and are aware of ...


5

I didn't find a good source for this information, so we (at Sefaria.org) analyzed our text, did some pattern recognition, corrected by hand, double checked, and came up with an authoritative mapping between the Mishnah and the Babylonian Talmud. Line numbers here refer to the segmentation in Sefaria's online Talmud.


5

In addition to my comments above, R. Neria Gutel, in his article "The Relationship Between Halakha, philosophy and education in Maharal's teachings" sums up the the view of the Maharal in halakhic works as follows: As spiritual leader and halakhic authority he was held in great esteem, as evidenced by the fact that Rabbi Avraham Braude (1650-1717), ...


5

Minhagei Lita (Customs of Lithuanian Jewry) by Rabbi Menachem Mendel Poliakoff.


5

Deut. 7:11 states: "You shall observe the commandment, and the decrees, and the ordinances, that I command you, today, to perform them." The Torah writes about Earthly rewards, and not a lot about the world to come (afterlife) or the resurrection (see further in Deut. Ch.7:12-etc.) One reason for this is the word "today" in Deut.7:11. The Torah is meant ...


5

There are many series of such books, a few I like are R Daniel Mann from Eretz Hemda has a very nice series called Living the halachic process (also available one of them also available on Kindle) - you can sample some online as part of the OU Vebbe Rebbe series (I cannot find the table of contents, try varying the number in the URL) R Ari Enkin has ...


4

The MaharalNach and MaharalBach are the same person. Rabbi Levi ibn Chaviv. If you state the Arabic version of 'son of' it's ibn, abbreviated as a single Nun, hence the N'Ch(aviv). If you write the Hebrew version of 'son of' it's ben, hence the B'Ch(aviv). Here's his wiki entry http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Levi_ibn_Habib


4

This is discussed at length in the hakdamah to the Mosad R' Kook Ritva, and in R' Avrohom Shoshana's Ritva published by Ofeq Institute. In brief, the old Ritva acc. to some is ר' כרשכש. The new one acc. to some is Ritva, acc. to R' Shoshanah it's mostly the Ramah with some others. It's more complicated than that, but that's the Cliff Notes answer.


4

Well, you wanted scholarly sources, so here is one in "Seventeenth Century Hebrew Books Volume 2" by Marvin J. Heller 2011 p. 665: Caro's authorship of Maggid Mesharim has been disputed. A number of writers, particularly those who did not wish to attribute a mystical work to a leading halakhic authority, questioned Caro's authorship, an attribution that ...


4

HebrewBooks.org has the 1873 Thorn printing of ויכוח רבנו יחיאל מפריס Vikuach Rabeinu Yechiel meParis (alternate scan), and the 1928 Lwów (= Lvov = Lemberg) printing, ויכוח רבנו יחיאל מפאריז (alternate scan).


4

They are all available here: Bereishis Shemos Vayikra Bemidbar Devarim


4

Kol Dodi on the Haftaros, by Rabbi David Feinstein. According to the publisher: In this masterpiece, the Rosh Yeshivah introduces each Haftarah, explains its historical context where necessary, shows its relationship to the Parashah, and offers an enlightening commentary in his own unique, original manner.


4

http://kiddushhachodesh.com/ has many videos decently done.


4

My personal favorite to share at the Shabbos table is The Shabbos Kitchen by Rabbi Simcha Bunim Cohen and his entire Shabbos Halacha series. Each chapter generally begins with a overview of the principles involved followed by a sampling of practical applications. Each part is followed by a summary. I have used it at the Shabbos table and my family ...


4

Check out The 39 Avoth Melacha of Shabbath by Rabbi Baruch Chait. It is designed for children, with the entire book being pictures. Each quarter of a page deals with a melacha, with pictures of different forms of the melacha around. It shows for each action whether it is d'oraita, d'rabbanan, or permitted. It does not delve into the reasons much (at all), ...


4

HebrewBooks has the volumes of R. Ashlag's edition , which includes translation of the Aramaic into Hebrew. Type "הסולם" into the site's 'Title' search box to get the list of volumes.


4

I believe this is a work by Rabbi Binyamin Kazis on the Semag available here (note: the print is from the 18th century). The page in question on lavin 258 can be viewed here. The beginning of it is the following:


4

ArtScroll has a book titled "The Fifth Commandment" that sounds like it might be what you're looking for. http://www.artscroll.com/Books/9781578191918.html


4

Some passages that are understood by some to refer to personal resurrection include: Isaiah 26:19: Oh, let Your dead revive! Let corpses arise! Awake and shout for joy, You who dwell in the dust!— For Your dew is like the dew on fresh growth; You make the land of the shades come to life. Job 19:25-27: But I know that my Vindicator ...



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