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Check out The 39 Avoth Melacha of Shabbath by Rabbi Baruch Chait. It is designed for children, with the entire book being pictures. Each quarter of a page deals with a melacha, with pictures of different forms of the melacha around. It shows for each action whether it is d'oraita, d'rabbanan, or permitted. It does not delve into the reasons much (at all), ...


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I would suggest, as others have, something along the lines of either Seforno or the Ramban. However, one of the best options to my mind is to begin learning the commentary of the Malbim (מלבי"ם - Rav Meir Leibush Ben Yechiel Michel z"l). If you can read the Hebrew, then I suggest getting a set and using that, but if you can't then Artscroll has a series ...


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I decided to get the Simanim tikkun. It's really cool. It provides all of the requirements in the question, and more. This is an example of the beginning of parshat Shmot in the pocket-sized edition. Some features to notice: Shva na/ch -- ונפתלי, for example, shows both versions Kamatz katan -- on וימת Weekday aliyah breaks -- the diamonds before ויקם ...


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No. Not at all. But you can purchase the book from Makhon Mosheh in Israel. Their website is www.net-sah.org If it is not online, then try calling or emailing them. Their site is currently being updated and is under a bit of minor construction. I personally have it on my shelf. Is there a particular passage that you are looking for that I could post a ...


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See this article which cites mainly Choshen Mishpat for support. In short - browsing is permitted as the store owner expects customers to browse. If, at the end, you don't buy because you didn't find what you wanted or didn't like the price, etc. that's fine. A nicer thing to do is to indicate this to the owner, but, it's not required. However, if you have ...


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Rav Eliyahu Dessler (Michtav Me’Eliyahu Volume 1, Kuntres HaChesed, pages 35-38) says, “Every positive emotion stems from giving and flows outward from us to others, whereas every negative emotion revolves around taking for selfish motives.” Indeed, the root of the Hebrew word for אהבה, love, is הב, to give. In other words, “Giving leads to Love."


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The new עוז והדר גמרא (red cover) now have an in-built תוס' הרא''ש and also a new feature 'מבואות התוס right at the back which explains the גמרא elsewhere quoted by תוס and explains it clearly and briefly.



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