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10

The original question as well as @SAH challenge seem to imply that the Torah forbids piercings. This belief is possibly coming from the prohibition of tatoos as the prohibition to injure oneself. But as we will say the halacha doesn't necessarily consider all body piercings forbidden. As context, plastic surgery (a more extreme form of bodily injury for ...


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There are a few opinions about the order of the names on the stones (Rashi says that they were ordered by age, from top-right to bottom-left), while Da'at Zekenim miBa'alei haTosfot think that the order is by their mothers (i.e. first all of Leah's sons, then Bilha, etc.). These two opinions can be found here. As for the connection of each stone to a ...


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Since you wouldn't be sure where the person wearing the bracelet might end up going, it would be better to avoid such a practice. There are places where a Jew should not bring written names, like into a bathroom for example. A better practice would be to write a common abbreviation that many people write in any holy book they own. Namely, לה״ הו״מ. This ...


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The gemmora in first perek of megillah says that Achashverosh ordered Vashti to come before him as described in your question.


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You are most probably thinking of the Gemara Sota 8b which uses that exact depiction. The discussion there is about a Sota. The Mishna, after mentioning a couple of ways how she is de-beautified, says that if she is wearing gold or jewelry it is removed. The Gemara wonders, is this necessary to tell us after describing how she is degraded? The Gemara answers,...


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Halochakli it is permitted if a chatzitza covers less than half the body (or heir) and it does not bother most of the woman like her (that have her profession) But the minhag is lohathila for mikva no chatzitza at all, ( bidieved if like above (halochakly permited) then OK, (if went home already even more lenient (ask a Rabbi) so that people should not ...


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The passuk says in Mishlei 11,22, 'Nezem zagav be'af chazir, ishah yaphah v'soras taam'. A gold ring in the nose of a pig, a beatifull woman with no reason. The mishna in Avos 6,2 quotes this passuk to describe someone who is blessed with physical endowments but does not learn Torah. The Ruach ha'Chaim on this mishna explains this is analogous to a naked ...


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Most likely Ezekiel 16:7, where God describes finding the Jewish people as "all fancied up, but naked." The Passover Hagada quotes this verse -- when it says the Jewish people had become "great", that means great in potential but completely unpolished, just as Ezekiel describes it.


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No one should be offended by you choosing to wear a necklace. It's hard to say who will be offended by what as t here is always some fool that's looking to be offended by something. That being said the star of David is not a religious symbol but a relatively new cultural symbol.


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Several Mishnayoth and Gemaroth are linked to the question. Through these texts that we will discover the Halacha. The first appears in Mishna (Baba Kama Chapter 8 Mishna 5) "הַחוֹבֵל בְּעַצְמוֹ, אַף עַל פִּי שֶׁאֵינוֹ רַשַּׁאי, פָּטוּר" It concerns the right to wound itself.The Gemara's Pilpulim evoked in this connection: the damage, suffering,Shame ...


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In addition to what my predecessors wrote, today's smartwatches include two functions that must be disabled before Shabbat: a. Communication: e.g. Bluetooth, WiFi, etc. If the smartwatch has "Airplane Mode", then you must turn it on. I don't think that turning off the "Bluetooth" will be enough, because there are more functions that should be disabled, but ...



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