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32

Yes, there is a history of Jewish communities in Arab countries relying on the Muslim call to prayer for their own praying times. For one such example, here is the Ben Ish Hai, (Hacham Yosef Haim) who lived from 1832-1909 in Baghdad, and who refers to the maghrab (an Islamic prayer-time called after sunset) in various places: Ben Ish Hai, Year 1, ...


18

God's further comments in Genesis 17 and 21 clarify that Isaac is the sole descendant who would be the bearer of the covenant. (See, for example, 21:12 and 17:19-21.)


14

No. Prof. Eliezer Segal, in an essay entitled "Monkey Business," discussing the unfortunate contemporary phenomenon of "Islamicist clerics" preaching that Jews, generally, are descended from apes and pigs, says that there is no Jewish source to be found for this story: Unfortunately, in all the vast stores of ancient rabbinic literature, no text has yet ...


13

There are many reasons why Muhammad could not have been a true prophet, according to Jewish belief. I'll summarize at the top of this answer and then drill down into particulars. Because of Bilaam's wickedness, as emblematic of the wickedness of gentile prophets, God removed prophecy from the gentiles (Midrash Tanchuma, Balak, siman 1). Muhammad was born ...


13

The Talmud (Sanhedrin 99b) says that one who is mevazeh a Torah Sage has no place in the World to Come. Shulchan Aruch (Yoreh Deah 334:43) lists this as the first of 24 reasons why a person can be excommunicated, even after the Sage passed away. As discussed in the commentaries there, the Sage has to be of a certain stature for it to reach that point. I ...


12

Besides the main issue of God's explicit identification of Isaac for this inheritance, already conveyed in DoubleAA's answer, note that Islam is a belief system whose creation came way after the events described in Genesis, and one that doesn't have any special status in Judaism. Therefore, it's impossible that Judaism would consider the subject of verses in ...


9

Coming in late to the party, so this just comes to reinforce Yishai's answer, but I feel compelled to mention the Rambam's "Iggeret Teyman". Background: The "Epistle to Yemen" was written by Maimonides back in 1172, specifically to answer the rabbis of the Jewish community in Yemen who were being forced to convert to Islam. There was apparently a ...


8

There has certainly been some cross-pollination of ideas over the years, e.g. certain moral lessons that you'd see in the classical Jewish philosophical work Hovot HaLevavot also appear in the Hadith. And as Islam is clearly a monotheistic faith, it avoids the problems posed by laws about "idols" or "pagans." (E.g. halacha has a lot of problems with a Jew ...


8

You could call him "cousin". That could be a nice way to emphasize the relationship between Jews and Muslims as descendents of Abraham. "Friend" would also be appropriate. I'm not exactly sure about Muslim protocol, but for Jews, it is not necessary to use a word for him, and as havarka says, you could simply call him by his first name or Mr. Last Name, ...


6

I doubt you'll find a positive statement -- "we think it came from X" -- because, like any other work of fiction, it doesn't really concern us. As hinted at in the question, Jews do not consider Muhammad to be a prophet. This is for at least two reasons: The age of prophecy had ended by then. When we next see prophecy we'll be in the time of the ...


6

No, there are no extant texts from Jewish scholars on meeting Mohammed. There has been much academic scholarship on the Jewish presence of Saudia Arabia during the formation of Islam. A good place to begin is The Jews of Arab Lands by the brilliant scholar Norman Stillman. But the history is complicated and this is a serious question, so the long answer that ...


6

We have a commandment to love G-d, and we are taught that man is created in the Image of G-d. So, first, one could argue that Jews are obligated to love other monotheists, which includes Muslims; I don't think we count that as a commandment, however. As Double AA notes, we are told to love the "stranger" because we were strangers, and we are enjoined from ...


6

There are two questions here: the one you asked and the one you intended to ask. To answer the question that you asked, even if someone accepts Mohammad as a prophet, he remains Jewish. Nothing can remove a person's Jewishness. Once one is Jewish, he is Jewish forever, no matter how many sins he commits. In response to the question you intended to ask, ...


5

It would depend both on what's in it and how it was processed. There are many ingredients that are Halal and/or vegetarian and are not kosher (e.g. non-kosher wine [which might also be vegan]; some produce from Israel; turtle eggs). Also cooking utensils/processing equipment would have to be kosher. That said, there are some products that don't require ...


4

Devarim 13:1-4: Everything I command you that you shall be careful to do it. You shall neither add to it, nor subtract from it. If there will arise among you a prophet, or a dreamer of a dream, and he gives you a sign or a wonder, and the sign or the wonder of which he spoke to you happens, [and he] says, "Let us go after other gods which you ...


3

they have a temporary merit in Israel as the zohar says (Zohar Shemot 32A) God distanced the children of Ishmael from supernal cleaving and gave them [only] a portion below in the Holy Land on account of their circumcision. And in the future, the children of Ishmael are destined to rule over the Holy Land for a long time when it is empty from ...


3

Convert to Islam and practice Islam outwardly without getting caught. Rambam himself was a victim of such an ISIS like group, he feigned conversion when in danger.


3

what about his name?! That sounds like appropriate! or Believer!


2

Pas Lechem commentary on shaar yichud ch.6 "Perhaps they (the gentile philosophers) found them from an early book of one of our sages, and stole and denied and put it in their bags as they did for other wisdoms they ruled over and called it on their names, as written in the Kuzari book (maamar sheni ot 1)" - perhaps we can say the same for some of the ...


2

Can you call him "achi"? That means "my brother" in Hebrew. I don't know if that would be acceptable under your religious beliefs (as it isn't in Arabic), but that might work. You could also consider calling him "yedidi" which means my friend in Hebrew. Or you might try "gadol" which can mean something along the lines of "big man" or significant ...


2

Based on the answer of @Yishai here: the Torah speaks in several places about loving the stranger (e.g. Leviticus 19:33) and helping him (ibid 25:35, Deuteronomy 14:21). A non-Jew who fits this category is called a "ger toshav". Based on the above verses, Rambam (Melachim 10:12) writes that a "ger toshev" has to be treated with the same respect and ...


2

There are several main problems with vegetarian/vegan products. 1) The reliability of the vegan/halal certifying agency is questionable from a Halachik perspective. 2) Jewish law is extremely strict on the prohibition of eating bugs, which are common in vegetable products. (Though this is less of a problem in a paste or puree where the bug cannot possibly ...


1

The Shulchan Aruch in Yoreh De'ah siman 157 siff two discusses some of your suggestions. See especially the end of the Ramma which would seemingly rule that any possible leniency of wearing clothes without any verbal proclamation would not apply being that this is not a time of gzeira but rather just a financial interest. אסור לאדם לומר שהוא עובד כוכבי' כדי ...


1

The basic requirement for a prophet (or just any Jew) is to not change anything written in the Torah (Including of course the Mitzvot). - See Rambam's Hilchot Yesod Torah Halacha Alef for that Halacha specifically for prophets. Additionaly all that the prophet predicts must be true not just a part, and he should be checked many times (except for death, ...


1

I remember learning in school a Ramban which comments on the episode with Hagar being kicked out; if you want I can look for it and find the exact wording. Anyways, he writes basically that because Sarah kicked her out, this caused that the Arabs will continue to hate and attack us relentlessly until the times of Mashiach. Also, there are sefarim kedoshim ...



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