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18

God's further comments in Genesis 17 and 21 clarify that Isaac is the sole descendant who would be the bearer of the covenant. (See, for example, 21:12 and 17:19-21.)


13

There are many reasons why Muhammad could not have been a true prophet, according to Jewish belief. I'll summarize at the top of this answer and then drill down into particulars. Because of Bilaam's wickedness, as emblematic of the wickedness of gentile prophets, God removed prophecy from the gentiles (Midrash Tanchuma, Balak, siman 1). Muhammad was born ...


12

Normative halacha (שלחן ערוך סימן ב, and שמלה חדשה ב) both state unequivocally that the שחיטה of a non-Jew is forbidden on the biblical level. See here for why I care so much about the Simla Chadasha. HOWEVER, the opinion of the Rambam (mentioned in other answers, הלכות שחיטה in 4:11-12) is that this is only a rabbinic enactment for certain types of ...


12

Besides the main issue of God's explicit identification of Isaac for this inheritance, already conveyed in DoubleAA's answer, note that Islam is a belief system whose creation came way after the events described in Genesis, and one that doesn't have any special status in Judaism. Therefore, it's impossible that Judaism would consider the subject of verses in ...


12

The Talmud (Sanhedrin 99b) says that one who is mevazeh a Torah Sage has no place in the World to Come. Shulchan Aruch (Yoreh Deah 334:43) lists this as the first of 24 reasons why a person can be excommunicated, even after the Sage passed away. As discussed in the commentaries there, the Sage has to be of a certain stature for it to reach that point. I ...


11

No. Prof. Eliezer Segal, in an essay entitled "Monkey Business," discussing the unfortunate contemporary phenomenon of "Islamicist clerics" preaching that Jews, generally, are descended from apes and pigs, says that there is no Jewish source to be found for this story: Unfortunately, in all the vast stores of ancient rabbinic literature, no text has yet ...


10

As Mark Twain (supposedly) said, history may not repeat itself, but it sure does rhyme. Lo and behold, there was Islamic extremism 800 years ago, when Rabbi Moses Maimonides was alive -- and he left a paper trail. If you were to open up the Yad HaChazaka (his code of law), it would appear that if there is a time when there is a concerted effort to wipe out ...


10

Textual indicators abound for the eternal and immutable nature of the Torah. Besides examples provided in other answers, here are a couple more examples: Even all that the LORD hath commanded you by the hand of Moses, from the day that the LORD gave commandment, and onward throughout your generations (B'midbar 15:23). And thou shalt keep His ...


9

Coming in late to the party, so this just comes to reinforce Yishai's answer, but I feel compelled to mention the Rambam's "Iggeret Teyman". Background: The "Epistle to Yemen" was written by Maimonides back in 1172, specifically to answer the rabbis of the Jewish community in Yemen who were being forced to convert to Islam. There was apparently a ...


8

There has certainly been some cross-pollination of ideas over the years, e.g. certain moral lessons that you'd see in the classical Jewish philosophical work Hovot HaLevavot also appear in the Hadith. And as Islam is clearly a monotheistic faith, it avoids the problems posed by laws about "idols" or "pagans." (E.g. halacha has a lot of problems with a Jew ...


7

The most explicit place in the Torah is Deuteronomy 13:2-6: יג,ב כִּי-יָקוּם בְּקִרְבְּךָ נָבִיא, אוֹ חֹלֵם חֲלוֹם; וְנָתַן אֵלֶיךָ אוֹת, אוֹ מוֹפֵת. יג,ג וּבָא הָאוֹת וְהַמּוֹפֵת, אֲשֶׁר-דִּבֶּר אֵלֶיךָ לֵאמֹר: נֵלְכָה אַחֲרֵי אֱלֹהִים אֲחֵרִים, אֲשֶׁר לֹא-יְדַעְתָּם--וְנָעָבְדֵם. יג,ד לֹא תִשְׁמַע, אֶל-דִּבְרֵי הַנָּבִיא הַהוּא, אוֹ אֶל-חוֹלֵם ...


6

Although all agree that the Torah, as a practical matter, will not change, there is a disagreement between the Rambam and others (e.g. Sefer HaIkkarim 3:16) if this is an inherent quality, and thus a fundamental aspect of belief, or just something that G-d decided. In addition, within G-d's commandments, there is a concept of ניתנה תורה, ונתחדשה הלכה - when ...


6

We have a commandment to love G-d, and we are taught that man is created in the Image of G-d. So, first, one could argue that Jews are obligated to love other monotheists, which includes Muslims; I don't think we count that as a commandment, however. As Double AA notes, we are told to love the "stranger" because we were strangers, and we are enjoined from ...


6

I doubt you'll find a positive statement -- "we think it came from X" -- because, like any other work of fiction, it doesn't really concern us. As hinted at in the question, Jews do not consider Muhammad to be a prophet. This is for at least two reasons: The age of prophecy had ended by then. When we next see prophecy we'll be in the time of the ...


6

You could call him "cousin". That could be a nice way to emphasize the relationship between Jews and Muslims as descendents of Abraham. "Friend" would also be appropriate. I'm not exactly sure about Muslim protocol, but for Jews, it is not necessary to use a word for him, and as havarka says, you could simply call him by his first name or Mr. Last Name, ...


5

The rambam wrote responsa concerning this. See igeres hashmad where he clearly says choose islam not death, as apposed to Christianity which is complete heresy, where one must give up their life for kiddush Hashem.


5

No, there are no extant texts from Jewish scholars on meeting Mohammed. There has been much academic scholarship on the Jewish presence of Saudia Arabia during the formation of Islam. A good place to begin is The Jews of Arab Lands by the brilliant scholar Norman Stillman. But the history is complicated and this is a serious question, so the long answer that ...


4

The Rashi referenced in my answer there says in part: אלו ערביים השוכנים באהלים במדברות ורועים מקנה כל ימיהם These are the arabs that dwell in tents in the desert and pasture flocks all their lives. So Rashi explicitly conflates the two. Then again, arabs in Rashi's terminology might more mean desert dwellers rather than the modern definition of ...


3

The Rambam, in his Igeret Taiman (Epsitle to Yemen) addresses the quote. I realize this doesn't quite answer the question completely, but he does reject Islam as part of the blessing. (Translation is from http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Epistle_to_Yemen/VIII) The phrase "a great nation" cited above does not connote a people in possession of prophecy or a ...


3

I have been wrestling with this question for a while now. The question seems valid as worded "Why don't Jews accept that Mohammed was a prophet?" Job is not considered a prophet and Bil'am was a prophet in that he had to carry a message from god, but not as a prophet giving prophecy to the Jewish people. Bil'am was speaking about the Jews but was telling ...


3

Assuming one would be allowed to pray in the synagogue if it weren't attached to the House of the One, I don't see why not. It shouldn't be any different than the chapel area at JFK where there are three separate rooms next to each other for Muslims, Christians, and Jews and the chaplains share an office.


3

what about his name?! That sounds like appropriate! or Believer!


3

they have a temporary merit in Israel as the zohar says (Zohar Shemot 32A) God distanced the children of Ishmael from supernal cleaving and gave them [only] a portion below in the Holy Land on account of their circumcision. And in the future, the children of Ishmael are destined to rule over the Holy Land for a long time when it is empty from ...


2

Pas Lechem commentary on shaar yichud ch.6 "Perhaps they (the gentile philosophers) found them from an early book of one of our sages, and stole and denied and put it in their bags as they did for other wisdoms they ruled over and called it on their names, as written in the Kuzari book (maamar sheni ot 1)" - perhaps we can say the same for some of the ...


2

Can you call him "achi"? That means "my brother" in Hebrew. I don't know if that would be acceptable under your religious beliefs (as it isn't in Arabic), but that might work. You could also consider calling him "yedidi" which means my friend in Hebrew. Or you might try "gadol" which can mean something along the lines of "big man" or significant ...


2

In addition to everything else stated here, the Rambam in his introduction to the last chapter of Sanhedrin, where he develops his 13 foundations of Jewish belief, explains the immutability of the Torah as the 9th foundation, and quotes the verse "You shall not add onto [the Torah] or subtract from it" (Deuteronomy 13:1) as the source of this central belief. ...


2

End of Malachi and the final word of the prophets to keep in mind before the arrival of Eliyahu: "Remember the Torah of Moshe my servant, which I enjoined on him at Horev (Sinai), laws and rulings for all Israel. 5 Look, I will send to you Eliyahu the prophet before the coming of the great and terrible Day of God. 6 He will turn the hearts of the ...


2

Convert to Islam and practice Islam outwardly without getting caught. Rambam himself was a victim of such an ISIS like group, he feigned conversion when in danger.


1

I remember learning in school a Ramban which comments on the episode with Hagar being kicked out; if you want I can look for it and find the exact wording. Anyways, he writes basically that because Sarah kicked her out, this caused that the Arabs will continue to hate and attack us relentlessly until the times of Mashiach. Also, there are sefarim kedoshim ...



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