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33

Yes, there is a history of Jewish communities in Arab countries relying on the Muslim call to prayer for their own praying times. For one such example, here is the Ben Ish Hai, (Hacham Yosef Haim) who lived from 1832-1909 in Baghdad, and who refers to the maghrab (an Islamic prayer-time called after sunset) in various places: Ben Ish Hai, Year 1, ...


20

God's further comments in Genesis 17 and 21 clarify that Isaac is the sole descendant who would be the bearer of the covenant. (See, for example, 21:12 and 17:19-21.)


12

Besides the main issue of God's explicit identification of Isaac for this inheritance, already conveyed in DoubleAA's answer, note that Islam is a belief system whose creation came way after the events described in Genesis, and one that doesn't have any special status in Judaism. Therefore, it's impossible that Judaism would consider the subject of verses in ...


6

There are two questions here: the one you asked and the one you intended to ask. To answer the question that you asked, even if someone accepts Mohammad as a prophet, he remains Jewish. Nothing can remove a person's Jewishness. Once one is Jewish, he is Jewish forever, no matter how many sins he commits. In response to the question you intended to ask, ...


6

It would depend both on what's in it and how it was processed. There are many ingredients that are Halal and/or vegetarian and are not kosher (e.g. non-kosher wine [which might also be vegan]; some produce from Israel; turtle eggs). Also cooking utensils/processing equipment would have to be kosher. That said, there are some products that don't require ...


6

No, there are no extant texts from Jewish scholars on meeting Mohammed. There has been much academic scholarship on the Jewish presence of Saudia Arabia during the formation of Islam. A good place to begin is The Jews of Arab Lands by the brilliant scholar Norman Stillman. But the history is complicated and this is a serious question, so the long answer that ...


4

The Salat includes the line "And I bear witness that Muhammad is [Allah's] servant and Messenger" which contradicts Jewish belief. You would not be allowed to say this line, and I think you would not be allowed to participate in the Salat in a manner that makes people think you are saying this line. I sort of think that if there were a Muslim prayer that ...


4

Devarim 13:1-4: Everything I command you that you shall be careful to do it. You shall neither add to it, nor subtract from it. If there will arise among you a prophet, or a dreamer of a dream, and he gives you a sign or a wonder, and the sign or the wonder of which he spoke to you happens, [and he] says, "Let us go after other gods which you ...


3

they have a temporary merit in Israel as the zohar says (Zohar Shemot 32A) God distanced the children of Ishmael from supernal cleaving and gave them [only] a portion below in the Holy Land on account of their circumcision. And in the future, the children of Ishmael are destined to rule over the Holy Land for a long time when it is empty from ...


3

There are no benefits to converting beyond the fact that you are serving as an example and teacher to the rest of the nations, and that your fate is tied to that of the Jewish people, who if are collectively righteous, are promised the opportunity for maximum spiritual growth. However, an extremely high degree of spiritual growth is available to gentiles who ...


2

Based on the answer of @Yishai here: the Torah speaks in several places about loving the stranger (e.g. Leviticus 19:33) and helping him (ibid 25:35, Deuteronomy 14:21). A non-Jew who fits this category is called a "ger toshav". Based on the above verses, Rambam (Melachim 10:12) writes that a "ger toshev" has to be treated with the same respect and ...


2

There are several main problems with vegetarian/vegan products. 1) The reliability of the vegan/halal certifying agency is questionable from a Halachik perspective. 2) Jewish law is extremely strict on the prohibition of eating bugs, which are common in vegetable products. (Though this is less of a problem in a paste or puree where the bug cannot possibly ...


2

The short answer is no. We are permitted to hate evildoers. Nonetheless, the Mishna in Avot Chapter 2 says (this is a text that contains the spirit of Torah ethics as passed down from God to Moses…) that hatred of people destroys the person who hates. Also, according to Rambam (Maimonides), even the 7 nations of Canaan and Amalek whom we are commanded ...


1

Disproving a negative is difficult, but I will say that there is no religious text that prescribes disliking or hating Muslims and I will support my assertion with circumstantial evidence. Throughout history, major Jewish leaders have had good relations with Muslims. Rambam was a physician of the royal family of the Ayyubid dynasty. If there was a ...


1

The Shulchan Aruch in Yoreh De'ah siman 157 siff two discusses some of your suggestions. See especially the end of the Ramma which would seemingly rule that any possible leniency of wearing clothes without any verbal proclamation would not apply being that this is not a time of gzeira but rather just a financial interest. אסור לאדם לומר שהוא עובד כוכבי' כדי ...


1

The basic requirement for a prophet (or just any Jew) is to not change anything written in the Torah (Including of course the Mitzvot). - See Rambam's Hilchot Yesod Torah Halacha Alef for that Halacha specifically for prophets. Additionaly all that the prophet predicts must be true not just a part, and he should be checked many times (except for death, ...


1

No, (it may not be considered proper by some, but) there is no such specific restriction. There are several cases in the Tanach in which even "Gdolei Hador" have worked in various places, from Yaacov at Lavan's, Yosef at Pharaoh's palace and onward... When talking about a Mosque or a Church, one should know that there is a din restricting entrance to a ...



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