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6

In most countries, the Sharia court is not the same as a secular (government legal system court) and would probably have no more authority in a non-Muslim society than a bais din. In that case, one should try bais din first. It would also judge by the religious rules of a different religion rather than secular law so dina d'malchusa would not apply. This ...


5

Your question is very broad. Let me address one aspect of it, namely interfaith dialogue with Christianity. R Avraham Gordiner writes here R. Moshe Feinstein, in a set of halakhic letters penned in 1967 to R. Yosef B. Soloveitchik of Boston and to Dr. Bernard Lander (Igr. Moshe YD 3:43-44), unequivocally forbade Jewish participation in ecumenical ...


4

The Salat includes the line "And I bear witness that Muhammad is [Allah's] servant and Messenger" which contradicts Jewish belief. You would not be allowed to say this line, and I think you would not be allowed to participate in the Salat in a manner that makes people think you are saying this line. I sort of think that if there were a Muslim prayer that ...


3

There are no benefits to converting beyond the fact that you are serving as an example and teacher to the rest of the nations, and that your fate is tied to that of the Jewish people, who if are collectively righteous, are promised the opportunity for maximum spiritual growth. However, an extremely high degree of spiritual growth is available to gentiles who ...


2

Based on the answer of @Yishai here: the Torah speaks in several places about loving the stranger (e.g. Leviticus 19:33) and helping him (ibid 25:35, Deuteronomy 14:21). A non-Jew who fits this category is called a "ger toshav". Based on the above verses, Rambam (Melachim 10:12) writes that a "ger toshev" has to be treated with the same respect and ...


2

The short answer is no. We are permitted to hate evildoers. Nonetheless, the Mishna in Avot Chapter 2 says (this is a text that contains the spirit of Torah ethics as passed down from God to Moses…) that hatred of people destroys the person who hates. Also, according to Rambam (Maimonides), even the 7 nations of Canaan and Amalek whom we are commanded ...


2

Disproving a negative is difficult, but I will say that there is no religious text that prescribes disliking or hating Muslims and I will support my assertion with circumstantial evidence. Throughout history, major Jewish leaders have had good relations with Muslims. Rambam was a physician of the royal family of the Ayyubid dynasty. If there was a ...


2

The Shulchan Aruch in Yoreh De'ah siman 157 siff two discusses some of your suggestions. See especially the end of the Ramma which would seemingly rule that any possible leniency of wearing clothes without any verbal proclamation would not apply being that this is not a time of gzeira but rather just a financial interest. אסור לאדם לומר שהוא עובד כוכבי' כדי ...


1

No, (it may not be considered proper by some, but) there is no such specific restriction. There are several cases in the Tanach in which even "Gdolei Hador" have worked in various places, from Yaacov at Lavan's, Yosef at Pharaoh's palace and onward... When talking about a Mosque or a Church, one should know that there is a din restricting entrance to a ...



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