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12

There are many reasons why Muhammad could not have been a true prophet, according to Jewish belief. I'll summarize at the top of this answer and then drill down into particulars. Because of Bilaam's wickedness, as emblematic of the wickedness of gentile prophets, God removed prophecy from the gentiles (Midrash Tanchuma, Balak, siman 1). Muhammad was born ...


11

No. Prof. Eliezer Segal, in an essay entitled "Monkey Business," discussing the unfortunate contemporary phenomenon of "Islamicist clerics" preaching that Jews, generally, are descended from apes and pigs, says that there is no Jewish source to be found for this story: Unfortunately, in all the vast stores of ancient rabbinic literature, no text has yet ...


9

Textual indicators abound for the eternal and immutable nature of the Torah. Besides examples provided in other answers, here are a couple more examples: Even all that the LORD hath commanded you by the hand of Moses, from the day that the LORD gave commandment, and onward throughout your generations (B'midbar 15:23). And thou shalt keep His ...


9

Normative halacha (שלחן ערוך סימן ב, and שמלה חדשה ב) both state unequivocally that the שחיטה of a non-Jew is forbidden on the biblical level. See here for why I care so much about the Simla Chadasha. HOWEVER, the opinion of the Rambam (mentioned in other answers, הלכות שחיטה in 4:11-12) is that this is only a rabbinic enactment for certain types of ...


8

There has certainly been some cross-pollination of ideas over the years, e.g. certain moral lessons that you'd see in the classical Jewish philosophical work Hovot HaLevavot also appear in the Hadith. And as Islam is clearly a monotheistic faith, it avoids the problems posed by laws about "idols" or "pagans." (E.g. halacha has a lot of problems with a Jew ...


8

Coming in late to the party, so this just comes to reinforce Yishai's answer, but I feel compelled to mention the Rambam's "Iggeret Teyman". Background: The "Epistle to Yemen" was written by Maimonides back in 1172, specifically to answer the rabbis of the Jewish community in Yemen who were being forced to convert to Islam. There was apparently a ...


8

As Mark Twain (supposedly) said, history may not repeat itself, but it sure does rhyme. Lo and behold, there was Islamic extremism 800 years ago, when Rabbi Moses Maimonides was alive -- and he left a paper trail. If you were to open up the Yad HaChazaka (his code of law), it would appear that if there is a time when there is a concerted effort to wipe out ...


7

The most explicit place in the Torah is Deuteronomy 13:2-6: יג,ב כִּי-יָקוּם בְּקִרְבְּךָ נָבִיא, אוֹ חֹלֵם חֲלוֹם; וְנָתַן אֵלֶיךָ אוֹת, אוֹ מוֹפֵת. יג,ג וּבָא הָאוֹת וְהַמּוֹפֵת, אֲשֶׁר-דִּבֶּר אֵלֶיךָ לֵאמֹר: נֵלְכָה אַחֲרֵי אֱלֹהִים אֲחֵרִים, אֲשֶׁר לֹא-יְדַעְתָּם--וְנָעָבְדֵם. יג,ד לֹא תִשְׁמַע, אֶל-דִּבְרֵי הַנָּבִיא הַהוּא, אוֹ אֶל-חוֹלֵם ...


6

Although all agree that the Torah, as a practical matter, will not change, there is a disagreement between the Rambam and others (e.g. Sefer HaIkkarim 3:16) if this is an inherent quality, and thus a fundamental aspect of belief, or just something that G-d decided. In addition, within G-d's commandments, there is a concept of ניתנה תורה, ונתחדשה הלכה - when ...


6

We have a commandment to love G-d, and we are taught that man is created in the Image of G-d. So, first, one could argue that Jews are obligated to love other monotheists, which includes Muslims; I don't think we count that as a commandment, however. As Double AA notes, we are told to love the "stranger" because we were strangers, and we are enjoined from ...


4

The rambam wrote responsa concerning this. See igeres hashmad where he clearly says choose islam not death, as apposed to Christianity which is complete heresy, where one must give up their life for kiddush Hashem.


4

I have been wrestling with this question for a while now. The question seems valid as worded "Why don't Jews accept that Mohammed was a prophet?" Job is not considered a prophet and Bil'am was a prophet in that he had to carry a message from god, but not as a prophet giving prophecy to the Jewish people. Bil'am was speaking about the Jews but was telling ...


4

Great question! The answer, unfortunately, is not quite clear to me yet. Dunash ben Labrat (the author of this piyyut, 10th century Moroccan educated in Baghdad) is using the Biblical text of Isaiah 63:1-3, which speaks of Botzra and Edom. Mahzor Vitri (11th century French liturgical manuscript) has Edom (and this is also the version on piyut.org). Elizer ...


3

I do not have any specific citations but according to Rabbi Lamm in Torah uMadda: In the Geonic period, according to the eleventh-century R. Joseph Ibn Aknin (in his commentary to the Song of Songs), R. Hai Gaon (939-1038), 'the last and greatest of the Geonim,' did not hesitate to use Arabic sources, including Arabic love songs, to prove a Talmudic ...


3

The Rambam, in his Igeret Taiman (Epsitle to Yemen) addresses the quote. I realize this doesn't quite answer the question completely, but he does reject Islam as part of the blessing. (Translation is from http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Epistle_to_Yemen/VIII) The phrase "a great nation" cited above does not connote a people in possession of prophecy or a ...


3

Assuming one would be allowed to pray in the synagogue if it weren't attached to the House of the One, I don't see why not. It shouldn't be any different than the chapel area at JFK where there are three separate rooms next to each other for Muslims, Christians, and Jews and the chaplains share an office.


2

The Rashi referenced in my answer there says in part: אלו ערביים השוכנים באהלים במדברות ורועים מקנה כל ימיהם These are the arabs that dwell in tents in the desert and pasture flocks all their lives. So Rashi explicitly conflates the two. Then again, arabs in Rashi's terminology might more mean desert dwellers rather than the modern definition of ...


2

In addition to everything else stated here, the Rambam in his introduction to the last chapter of Sanhedrin, where he develops his 13 foundations of Jewish belief, explains the immutability of the Torah as the 9th foundation, and quotes the verse "You shall not add onto [the Torah] or subtract from it" (Deuteronomy 13:1) as the source of this central belief. ...


2

End of Malachi and the final word of the prophets to keep in mind before the arrival of Eliyahu: "Remember the Torah of Moshe my servant, which I enjoined on him at Horev (Sinai), laws and rulings for all Israel. 5 Look, I will send to you Eliyahu the prophet before the coming of the great and terrible Day of God. 6 He will turn the hearts of the ...


2

In rabbinic sources after the rise of Islam? Certainly, there was a cross-pollination of ideas. It may not be that a given rabbi was reading the Hadith per se, it may have been that they heard something from someone and said "wow, that's powerful." They may have known it was recorded as Hadith; or that it was loosely based on Islamic thought; or not at all. ...


1

Convert to Islam and practice Islam outwardly without getting caught. Rambam himself was a victim of such an ISIS like group, he feigned conversion when in danger.


1

after the death of the later prophets, the era of prophecy ended as written in the Talmud (Sanhedrin 11a) "תנו רבנן משמתו הנביאים האחרונים חגי זכריה ומלאכי נסתלקה הנבואה מישראל" (until the messiah comes and rebuilds the temple, etc)


1

There's a huge difference. Job and Bilaam are described as prophets by the Torah. We don't accept Muhammad as a prophet because we have no mesorah (tradition) from our sages that he was a prophet, and because his teachings do not necessarily sync with Jewish views. According to our tradition, one does not have to be Jewish per se to serve God, he just has ...



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