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24

I had never heard of this claim before. It certainly doesn't fit with everything I understand about Judaism. The Wikipedia article on Uzair (Qur'anic Arabic for Ezra, apparently) contains a great deal of interesting information about this claim in the Qur'an, including why it's incompatible with actual Jewish beliefs and some suppositions about how it got ...


17

If a non-Jew slaughters an animal, it is not kosher. (Mishna Chullin 1:1 [English on p. 36 of this .PDF], Rambam Shechita 4:11 [English translation], Shuchan Aruch YD 2:1 In fact, I know of no authority who has ever argued on this point.)


16

The Rambam in his אגרת השמד says outward acceptance of Islam is not ייהרג ואל יעבור. On the other hand, the Radvaz quotes the Ritva as saying that this is ייהרג ואל יעבור. According to the Rambam, outward acceptance of Islam is not ייהרג ואל יעבור because Islam is not עבודה זרה, and even though it is heretical because it denies the Torah, one does not have ...


13

As Dov F has noted, the argument over praying in a mosque is now split between R. Ovadia Yosef and the Tzitz Eliezer. Please see the update below regarding the original Rambam responsa that is referred to by R. Ovadia. The Tzitz Eliezer writes against praying in a mosque in his responsa Volume 14, #91: ולמדנו מכאן שהקדשים של כותים וגם המשוגע של ...


12

For many purposes of Jewish law, Muslims are treated exactly on a par with members of other faiths. Judaism doesn't recognize intermarriage - in either direction - as valid (Code of Jewish Law, Even Haezer 44:8); indeed, a Jewish man would have to be prepared to give up his life rather than have sexual relations with a non-Jewish woman (Shach, Yoreh De'ah ...


10

Maimonides describes the qualifications of a Jewish prophet. He also describes how to discern a prophet who appears to meet the qualifications, but still is shown to not be an authentic prophet. Among them: Therefore, if a prophet arises and attempts to dispute Moses' prophecy by performing great signs and wonders, we should not listen to him. We know ...


9

Regarding conversion to Judaism in general, the answers to this question (mentioned by DoubleAA in the comments here) provide ample coverage. I recommend that you read them all, but here are some main points: Jewish Law provides a mechanism for people who are not members of the Jewish Nation to become members - conversion. It's not easy, and it's actually ...


9

No more so than the belief that we are all G-d's children. Ezra is, however, compared to Moses (Sanhedrin, bottom of 21b; See also Yad Rama ad loc Sanhedrin 36a and Gittin 59a (comparing Ezra to Moses as a national leader and the greatest Torah scholar of his generation).


8

It's not so much "reject the Torah" as shorthand for "reject the traditional Jewish interpretation of the Torah, including to what extent it is binding today." Maimonides, Laws of Repentance 3:17 ג,יז שלושה הן הכופרים בתורה: האומר שאין התורה מעם ה', אפילו פסוק אחד, אפילו תיבה אחת--אם אמר משה אמרו מפי עצמו, הרי זה כופר בתורה; וכן הכופר בפירושה, והיא ...


8

Jews have different expectations of non-Jews than other religions have of their non-faithful. Jews believe that all people are commanded to obey G-d, and His commandments create a powerful and holy connection between Him and each individual. The commandments that apply to everybody are called the 7 Commandments of the Children of Noah. There is another, ...


6

In his Igerret Hashmad he teaches that Jews forcibly converted to Islam are not automatically or necessarily heretics. However he also limits this to the case presented to him and says that even in that situation martyrdom or fleeing is an option. http://thejewishchronicles.com/maimonides-iggeret-ha-shemad/ ...


6

The two questions that are nearly duplicates of this discuss whether a person is considered from the perspective of Halachah to be Jewish if he converts to another religion, and what the person's status is generally. But they don't, IMO, really address this specific problem. Here's the short answer: No. Here's the more complex answer: No. Unless you mean ...


5

According to the historian Bernard Lewis, The Jews of Islam : In general, Muslim polemicists pay little attention to the relatively insignificant Jew. Insofar as they deign to discuss the superseded religions, they are far more concerned with the Christians who, as the bearers of a competing proselytizing religion and the masters of a rival ...


5

In Judaism, someone is considered a gentile (or Jew) not based on his beliefs or actions. Being a Jew is having a status that attaches to a person under very specific circumstances; without those circumstances, he's a gentile. Specifically, to be a Jew one must be born to a Jewish mother or undergo the process of conversion that is specified in Jewish law. ...


5

As usual, there are many answers to this question, all of them are related. First, let's start with a brief history. In the time of Abraham, Abraham did try to convert many people. He did this by having an open tent which allowed people from every direction to come and learn about Gd. Then, in the time of the Exodus from Egypt, the Jewish people again, ...


5

The Radva"z in responsum 691* confirms that without a doubt the אבן שתיה (and by extension, the inner sanctum) is located "under the dome". He also notes that figuring out the particulars of what used to be where on the Har Habayis is very tricky business and requires careful calculation. *Bonus - This may also be the year construction on the dome was ...


4

That said, there are modern researchers who think that it was either (a) the base of the Mizbeyach (Altar), or (b) outside of the Temple complex altogether - according to this view, the sanctified part of the Har Habayis (500x500 cubits, Middos 2:1) lay in the southern half of the present-day Temple Mount (and incidentally, according to this view, the Kodesh ...


4

Great question! The answer, unfortunately, is not quite clear to me yet. Dunash ben Labrat (the author of this piyyut, 10th century Moroccan educated in Baghdad) is using the Biblical text of Isaiah 63:1-3, which speaks of Botzra and Edom. Mahzor Vitri (11th century French liturgical manuscript) has Edom (and this is also the version on piyut.org). Elizer ...


3

You are confusing the midrashic idea of the nations rejecting the torah as a unique gift with your idea of accepting that the torah has any divine origin. Note the midrash: http://www.jewishtreats.org/2011/06/give-them-choice.html There is an oft-cited Midrash (Sifrei, Dvarim 343) describing how God offered the Torah to the other nations of the world ...


3

There is a Sefer HaNehHomoh by the RaMbaM's father, Rabbi Maimon HaDayan HaSafardi (http://www.hebrewbooks.org/26889) He writes a whole letter to the jews who were forced to convert to islam in his time period. He quotes and explains posukim in order to calm them down and to tell them that they can still perform misSwoth and are still jews. The community at ...


3

Very few references to Muhammad exist in Jewish literature, especially before Maimonides. That being said, Pirkei deRabbi Eliezer contains several references to the rise of Islam, and some indirect references to Muhammad. They are actually crucial in dating PRE accurately: for example in chapter 30, they list 15 stages of Islamic rule that will lead to the ...


3

This requires making a distinction between Jewish peoplehood & religion and the Jewish faith: The Jewish faith is a universal one: strict monotheism combined with a basic set of moral & societal rules (the sheva mitzvos b’nei Noach, the seven Noachide Laws). Any human being that follows these guidelines is on the correct path. Islam has no special ...


3

According to this article, at Jewish Virtual Library, there were instances of polemical attacks between Jews and Muslims in a literary format, but no public disputations. The two main Islamic practitioners of such polemic are said there to have been Ibn Ḥazm and Samuel al-Maghribī, the second of whom had converted from Judaism. While the article does mention ...


3

When discussing someone of the stature of the Rambam, it is important to recognize that whatever Islamic and Greek sources he studied, they were filtered through one of the greatest Jewish minds of all time. The Rambam attested about himself that he read every book composed on religion available in Arabic; his greatness was that he was able to assimilate ...


3

Maimonides addressed this quite well 800-some years ago. Jews believe that the version of the faith and law as we have received it is binding upon us. For a Jew to say "I think G-d sent a new prophecy and changed all the laws" or "we got all the laws wrong and here's what they really are instead" would be considered heresy. (It is not, however, idolatry.) ...


3

One aspect of the answer has nothing to do with the text of the tanach. It is a matter of the era of prophecy having been completed well before these 2 were born according to Judaism. See Talmud Bavli, Masechet Yoma, 9b 6 lines up from the bottom “After the later prophets, Haggai, Zecharia, and Malachi, had died, the prophetic spirit disappeared from the ...


3

I do not have any specific citations but according to Rabbi Lamm in Torah uMadda: In the Geonic period, according to the eleventh-century R. Joseph Ibn Aknin (in his commentary to the Song of Songs), R. Hai Gaon (939-1038), 'the last and greatest of the Geonim,' did not hesitate to use Arabic sources, including Arabic love songs, to prove a Talmudic ...


2

There is no necessity for a non-Jew to become a Jew. Non-Jews also have an essential role in preparing this world for the world to come. They serve G-d through their own set of seven obligatory commandments which they must follow to ensure a place in the next world.



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