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27

I had never heard of this claim before. It certainly doesn't fit with everything I understand about Judaism. The Wikipedia article on Uzair (Qur'anic Arabic for Ezra, apparently) contains a great deal of interesting information about this claim in the Qur'an, including why it's incompatible with actual Jewish beliefs and some suppositions about how it got ...


27

Maimonides describes the qualifications of a Jewish prophet. He also describes how to discern a prophet who appears to meet the qualifications, but still is shown to not be an authentic prophet. Among them: Therefore, if a prophet arises and attempts to dispute Moses' prophecy by performing great signs and wonders, we should not listen to him. We know ...


20

If a non-Jew slaughters an animal, it is not kosher. (Mishna Chullin 1:1 [English on p. 36 of this .PDF], Rambam Shechita 4:11 [English translation], Shuchan Aruch YD 2:1 In fact, I know of no authority who has ever argued on this point.)


18

The Rambam in his אגרת השמד says outward acceptance of Islam is not ייהרג ואל יעבור. On the other hand, the Radvaz quotes the Ritva as saying that this is ייהרג ואל יעבור. According to the Rambam, outward acceptance of Islam is not ייהרג ואל יעבור because Islam is not עבודה זרה, and even though it is heretical because it denies the Torah, one does not have ...


17

No. This concept is completely foreign to Judaism. The other religion mentioned derived the concept from paganism, not Judaism.


14

As Dov F has noted, the argument over praying in a mosque is now split between R. Ovadia Yosef and the Tzitz Eliezer. Please see the update below regarding the original Rambam responsa that is referred to by R. Ovadia. The Tzitz Eliezer writes against praying in a mosque in his responsa Volume 14, #91: ולמדנו מכאן שהקדשים של כותים וגם המשוגע של ...


14

For many purposes of Jewish law, Muslims are treated exactly on a par with members of other faiths. Judaism doesn't recognize intermarriage - in either direction - as valid (Code of Jewish Law, Even Haezer 44:8); indeed, a Jewish man would have to be prepared to give up his life rather than have sexual relations with a non-Jewish woman (Shach, Yoreh De'ah ...


12

There are many reasons why Muhammad could not have been a true prophet, according to Jewish belief. I'll summarize at the top of this answer and then drill down into particulars. Because of Bilaam's wickedness, as emblematic of the wickedness of gentile prophets, God removed prophecy from the gentiles (Midrash Tanchuma, Balak, siman 1). Muhammad was born ...


11

No more so than the belief that we are all G-d's children. Ezra is, however, compared to Moses (Sanhedrin, bottom of 21b; See also Yad Rama ad loc Sanhedrin 36a and Gittin 59a (comparing Ezra to Moses as a national leader and the greatest Torah scholar of his generation).


11

No. Prof. Eliezer Segal, in an essay entitled "Monkey Business," discussing the unfortunate contemporary phenomenon of "Islamicist clerics" preaching that Jews, generally, are descended from apes and pigs, says that there is no Jewish source to be found for this story: Unfortunately, in all the vast stores of ancient rabbinic literature, no text has yet ...


9

Jews have different expectations of non-Jews than other religions have of their non-faithful. Jews believe that all people are commanded to obey G-d, and His commandments create a powerful and holy connection between Him and each individual. The commandments that apply to everybody are called the 7 Commandments of the Children of Noah. There is another, ...


9

Regarding conversion to Judaism in general, the answers to this question (mentioned by DoubleAA in the comments here) provide ample coverage. I recommend that you read them all, but here are some main points: Jewish Law provides a mechanism for people who are not members of the Jewish Nation to become members - conversion. It's not easy, and it's actually ...


9

Normative halacha (שלחן ערוך סימן ב, and שמלה חדשה ב) both state unequivocally that the שחיטה of a non-Jew is forbidden on the biblical level. See here for why I care so much about the Simla Chadasha. HOWEVER, the opinion of the Rambam (mentioned in other answers, הלכות שחיטה in 4:11-12) is that this is only a rabbinic enactment for certain types of ...


9

Textual indicators abound for the eternal and immutable nature of the Torah. Besides examples provided in other answers, here are a couple more examples: Even all that the LORD hath commanded you by the hand of Moses, from the day that the LORD gave commandment, and onward throughout your generations (B'midbar 15:23). And thou shalt keep His ...


8

It's not so much "reject the Torah" as shorthand for "reject the traditional Jewish interpretation of the Torah, including to what extent it is binding today." Maimonides, Laws of Repentance 3:17 ג,יז שלושה הן הכופרים בתורה: האומר שאין התורה מעם ה', אפילו פסוק אחד, אפילו תיבה אחת--אם אמר משה אמרו מפי עצמו, הרי זה כופר בתורה; וכן הכופר בפירושה, והיא ...


8

Coming in late to the party, so this just comes to reinforce Yishai's answer, but I feel compelled to mention the Rambam's "Iggeret Teyman". Background: The "Epistle to Yemen" was written by Maimonides back in 1172, specifically to answer the rabbis of the Jewish community in Yemen who were being forced to convert to Islam. There was apparently a ...


8

As Mark Twain (supposedly) said, history may not repeat itself, but it sure does rhyme. Lo and behold, there was Islamic extremism 800 years ago, when Rabbi Moses Maimonides was alive -- and he left a paper trail. If you were to open up the Yad HaChazaka (his code of law), it would appear that if there is a time when there is a concerted effort to wipe out ...


8

There has certainly been some cross-pollination of ideas over the years, e.g. certain moral lessons that you'd see in the classical Jewish philosophical work Hovot HaLevavot also appear in the Hadith. And as Islam is clearly a monotheistic faith, it avoids the problems posed by laws about "idols" or "pagans." (E.g. halacha has a lot of problems with a Jew ...


7

The most explicit place in the Torah is Deuteronomy 13:2-6: יג,ב כִּי-יָקוּם בְּקִרְבְּךָ נָבִיא, אוֹ חֹלֵם חֲלוֹם; וְנָתַן אֵלֶיךָ אוֹת, אוֹ מוֹפֵת. יג,ג וּבָא הָאוֹת וְהַמּוֹפֵת, אֲשֶׁר-דִּבֶּר אֵלֶיךָ לֵאמֹר: נֵלְכָה אַחֲרֵי אֱלֹהִים אֲחֵרִים, אֲשֶׁר לֹא-יְדַעְתָּם--וְנָעָבְדֵם. יג,ד לֹא תִשְׁמַע, אֶל-דִּבְרֵי הַנָּבִיא הַהוּא, אוֹ אֶל-חוֹלֵם ...


6

In his Igerret Hashmad he teaches that Jews forcibly converted to Islam are not automatically or necessarily heretics. However he also limits this to the case presented to him and says that even in that situation martyrdom or fleeing is an option. http://thejewishchronicles.com/maimonides-iggeret-ha-shemad/ ...


6

As usual, there are many answers to this question, all of them are related. First, let's start with a brief history. In the time of Abraham, Abraham did try to convert many people. He did this by having an open tent which allowed people from every direction to come and learn about Gd. Then, in the time of the Exodus from Egypt, the Jewish people again, ...


6

In Judaism, someone is considered a gentile (or Jew) not based on his beliefs or actions. Being a Jew is having a status that attaches to a person under very specific circumstances; without those circumstances, he's a gentile. Specifically, to be a Jew one must be born to a Jewish mother or undergo the process of conversion that is specified in Jewish law. ...


6

The two questions that are nearly duplicates of this discuss whether a person is considered from the perspective of Halachah to be Jewish if he converts to another religion, and what the person's status is generally. But they don't, IMO, really address this specific problem. Here's the short answer: No. Here's the more complex answer: No. Unless you mean ...


6

Although all agree that the Torah, as a practical matter, will not change, there is a disagreement between the Rambam and others (e.g. Sefer HaIkkarim 3:16) if this is an inherent quality, and thus a fundamental aspect of belief, or just something that G-d decided. In addition, within G-d's commandments, there is a concept of ניתנה תורה, ונתחדשה הלכה - when ...


6

We have a commandment to love G-d, and we are taught that man is created in the Image of G-d. So, first, one could argue that Jews are obligated to love other monotheists, which includes Muslims; I don't think we count that as a commandment, however. As Double AA notes, we are told to love the "stranger" because we were strangers, and we are enjoined from ...


5

The Radva"z in responsum 691* confirms that without a doubt the אבן שתיה (and by extension, the inner sanctum) is located "under the dome". He also notes that figuring out the particulars of what used to be where on the Har Habayis is very tricky business and requires careful calculation. *Bonus - This may also be the year construction on the dome was ...


5

According to the historian Bernard Lewis, The Jews of Islam : In general, Muslim polemicists pay little attention to the relatively insignificant Jew. Insofar as they deign to discuss the superseded religions, they are far more concerned with the Christians who, as the bearers of a competing proselytizing religion and the masters of a rival ...


5

When discussing someone of the stature of the Rambam, it is important to recognize that whatever Islamic and Greek sources he studied, they were filtered through one of the greatest Jewish minds of all time. The Rambam attested about himself that he read every book composed on religion available in Arabic; his greatness was that he was able to assimilate ...



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