Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

9

It's in אמרו לאלקים for Yom Kippur Shacharis. (I thought it's also in the Yotzer for Shabbos Shekalim, and the idea is indeed there, but not the exact phrase.)


9

Yonatan ben Uziel, Radak, Metzudat David, and Ibn Ezra say that the sign is outlined in verse 15. Yonatan Ben Uziel says on verse 15 and 16 the child is used as a time stamp of sorts. Basically deliverance from the two oppressing monarchy will end and the land will prosper before the child matures, and can distinguish between good and bad. It is possible ...


5

The general consensus among the commentators is that these "aliens" are converts to Judaism. (The phrase actually comes already in verse 3, right before where you began your quotation.) The confusion may be arising from Mechon-Mamre's translation that you are using. The words in Hebrew it is translating is "בני הנכר" (Or, in verse 3, the singular: "בן ...


4

In Avodah Zarah 64b, they ask: Who is a "ger toshav"? Whoever accepts upon himself, in front of three friends, not to worship idolatry — these are the words of Rabbi Me'ir. And the rabbis say: Whoever accepts upon himself the seven sins which the sons of Noach accepted upon themselves. And others (i.e. Elisha Acher) say: None of these are a "ger toshav." A ...


4

The word "חַטָּאִים‏" (with a Patach under the Chet and a Dagesh Chazak in the Tet) means sinners. See for example Tehillim 25:8. The word "חֲטָאִים‏" (with a Chataf-Patach under the Chet) means sins. See for example Kohelet 10:4. Without punctuation the word can be read both ways. Bruria is telling R' Meir that praying for them to die is not ...


4

The Shai LaMorah, on Tannah D'vei Eliyahu Zuta 20:6, explains that Hashem will reveal yet-unknown reasons for the Mitzvos and the Torah. Our newfound understanding of the reasons will make it seem as if there's a new Torah. He cites the Iyun Tefillah on the yotzer of Parshas Hachodesh.


3

As a strict language question, that should be asked on Hebrew.SE, which is where I think the question is coming from. From a Jewish perspective, it refers to the "my people" in that sentence. From a strict language point of view, it could arguably be ambiguous (מו - the suffix is sometimes singular if the context indicates it), however according to all of ...


3

Since the question presented in the title is a very broad one, I will focus on the more specific one presented in the text while touching upon other issues. The question asked was why it is so significant that a young woman will bear a child, implying that the issue is too mundane to be a "sign". Such a question, although understandable, incorrectly read ...


3

I have studied Isaiah several times, and I will share a few options, all of which I have tried. Judaica Press Isaiah. You can read the prophecies with translation right alongside to help with difficult words or phrases. The commentary is combination of Rashi and whatever other classic commentaries R' A. J. Rosenberg found useful (mostly Radak, Ibn Ezra, ...


3

Perhaps the verse is used as a kind of Kal VeChomer. The end of the verse says "for My house shall be called a house of prayer for all peoples." This is in line with what King Shlomo prayed for during the dedication of the Beit HaMikdash, Melachim I 8:41-43: And also to the stranger, who (is) not of Your people Israel, but will come from a far country ...


3

It's in the Haftarah for Parshat Netzavim and that of a wedding.


3

The book שערי נחמה (page נ"ה section ט) says the following verses are the ones which are read in regular (non-sad) trop, according to the custom of the yeshivot (the ashkenazi ones, I assume) in Eretz Yisrael: verse 1 verses 16 to 19 verses 24 to 27 All other verses are read in sad trop.


2

The verses immediately before this (vv. 18ff) describe segments of Egyptian society recognizing Hashem and coming to serve Him: "there will be five cities in the land of Egypt... which swear by G-d's name... there shall be an altar to G-d within the land of Egypt... for they will have cried out to G-d because of their oppressors, and He will send them a ...


2

Tunisian community reads this Hafatarah with a sad tune from verse 1 until verse 23. From verse 24 to the end, we switch to the special tune used for the hataraf of Yamim Tovim.


2

1) Here's is the commentary from Rashi: For a child has been born to us: Although Ahaz is wicked, his son who was born to him many years ago [nine years prior to his assuming the throne] to be our king in his stead, shall be a righteous man, and the authority of the Holy One, blessed be He, and His yoke shall be on his shoulder, for he shall ...


2

in the shaar bitachon (end of chapter 3) this verse is explained: WHY THE RIGHTEOUS SOMETIMES SUFFER Nevertheless, I saw fitting to attempt to clarify this matter that should be to some extent satisfactory . The possible reasons why a tzadik is prevented from obtaining his livelihood without effort and must instead exert himself for it and be tested by it ...


2

None of the words in the verse that imply divinity imply so absolutely. Thus, using the structure of the verse in your question is perfectly compatible with Jewish beliefs. ויקרא שמו פלא יועץ אל גבור אבי עד שר שלום... Concerning אל: see Gen 31:29 where אל means power, (See Onkelos the Convert's aramaic translation, חילא‏, power or strength, see ...


2

I'm not sure what light you want shed on this other than not to trust the Mikraot Gedolot for fine issues of proper nusach hamikra. The Aleppo, Leningrad, Bodmer, Damascus, and Cairo Codices (9th to 12th centuries) all have a כ. Bomberg's Mikraot Gedolot (2nd edition, 16th century, seen below) has a ב. Bomberg's edition is notorious for small errors, but its ...


1

For what's its worth, here's the version from the Dead Sea Scrolls: See it here: http://dss.collections.imj.org.il/isaiah?id=17:11#8:11 So that version, also has the word spelled with a "kaf".


1

Most commentators I saw claim that the correct translation is sinners. It could be that Beruriah really meant to state that the end goal of a world free of sinners may also be accomplished by bringing them to correct their ways.


1

A major challenge when studying the Rambam's Mishneh Torah is figuring out his sources. Countless commentaries and volumes have been written on finding the Rambam's sources. A contemporary example is Rabbi Chaim Kanievsky's קרית מלך. It's a small volume, and very concise, so it takes some work to figure why he considers a particular text the source for a ...


1

I don't think it's a universal custom to do this anyway. The Chabad custom (I mention it only because I'm familiar with it; I don't know whether it's unique to them, though) is to read this haftarah - and also, by the way, the one for Tisha Be'Av - with normal haftarah trop.


1

This is just what I've heard/seen over the years: Most people I've heard start the sad tune at verse 1. Either as it's the introduction; it registers with people because of the word "chazon"; or the fact that a prophet lived through four kings' reign meant the kings weren't lasting very long. But in London they didn't switch to sad until verse 2. (Anyone ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible