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14

It is a Mitzva to desecrate Shabbat to save lives (OC 328:2), even if it is only doubtful if a life is in danger (329:3), and one should even do this Mitzva with alacrity (329:1). The Shulchan Arukh writes (328:15): אמדוהו (פירוש התבוננו במחלתו ושיערו) הרופאים שצריך גרוגרת אחת ורצו עשרה והביאו לו כל אחד גרוגרת כולם פטורים ויש להם שכר טוב מאת ה' אפילו ...


8

Shulchan Aruch, Choshen Mishpat 421:5 says (in my own translation): Two who wrestled together, and one knocked the other to the ground so that he fell and got blinded, he's not liable. The S'ma explains: The reason for this is: Since they both wrestled willingly, each intending to knock down his fellow, and each knowing that it's impossible to be ...


8

The Shulchan Aruch (YD 345:3) writes: קטן המאבד עצמו לדעת, חשוב כשלא לדעת A minor who knowledgeably destroys himself is considered as if it was not done knowledgeably so it seems we would treat it like any other regular case of death.


8

First of all, I have to correct a common misconception in your question: that one must say Amen in order to fulfill one's obligation in the blessing. This is only true if the one saying the blessing is not fulfilling his obligation then as well. In the vast majority of cases where the one saying the blessing is fulfilling his obligation with you, you can ...


6

Madanei Asher page 168 discusses this question and answers as follows. Shaalos U'Tshuvis Radbaz - Volume 2 #772 says that a Jewish king is not judged and therefore would not go to exile. Regarding prior to the time of Yanai Hamelech when Jewish kings were judged he says even there a Jewish king would not be exiled based on the Gemara - Makos 10a that a ...


6

This is a machloket in Chulin 31a. נדה שנאנסה וטבלה אמר רב יהודה אמר רב טהורה לביתה ואסורה לאכול בתרומה ור' יוחנן אמר אף לביתה לא טהרה A nidah who did not intend to tovel (will be explained later): Rav Yehudah said in the name of Rav that she is pure for "her house" (i.e. to be with her husband), but still isn't able to eat trumah. Rabi Yochanan ...


6

The Shulchan Arukh in the laws of Nedarim (YD 210:1) rules that if one intended to prohibit wheat bread to himself as a Neder but only said "bread" unmodified, only wheat bread is prohibited to him. (The Shakh there rules this is only so if the omission of the type of bread was an accident, and one cannot rely on this rule Lechatchila.) Your case ("i will ...


5

The Gemara Eiruvin 65a says that אמר רב ששת משום רבי אלעזר בן עזריה יכול יכול אני לפטור את כל העולם כולו מן הדין מיום שחרב בית המקדש ועד עכשיו שנאמר לכן שמעי נא זאת ענייה ושכורת ולא מיין מיתיבי שיכור מקחו מקח וממכרו ממכר עבר עבירה שיש בה מיתה ממיתין אותו מלקות מלקין אותו כללו של דבר הרי הוא כפיקח לכל דבריו אלא שפטור מן התפלה מאי יכולני לפטור דקאמר נמי ...


5

The Mishna in Pesachim (6:6) discusses slaughtering a Korban Pesach on Shabbat and finding it to be a Tereifa. In the Rambam's ruling (Shegagot 2:10 (English)): וכן השוחט את הפסח ביום ארבעה עשר שחל להיות בשבת, ונודע לו אחר כן שמשכו הבעלים את ידיהם או מתו או נטמאו קודם שחיטה, או שנמצא טריפה בסתר, כגון ניקוב מעיים או ריאה--הרי זה פטור, מפני ששחט ברשות; אבל ...


4

The Ramban (Numbers 6:14) writes that the Nazir is sinning by leaving his elevated state, i.e. the sacrifice is for ending the state of being a Nazir. על דרך הפשט, כי האיש הזה חוטא נפשו במלאת הנזירות, כי הוא עתה נזור מקדושתו ועבודת השם, וראוי היה לו שיזיר לעולם ויעמוד כל ימיו נזיר וקדוש לאלקיו The Rambam sees in the Nazir support for his approach that ...


4

It depends on the case. But you should not go out of your way to exempt yourself from a mitzva. If we're told "it's a mitzva to do ABC", then we should think proactively about trying to do ABC, not wheedling out of it. The diabetic needs to eat on Yom Kippur? We certainly understand. A healthy person who felt like going for a ten mile run, but boy now he's ...


4

The Rambam (Kilayim 1:3) and the Shulchan Aruch (YD 297:2) explicitly rule that the issue of Kilaei Zeraim (planting mixtures of edible seeds (except grapes)) only applies in the Land of Israel and a Jew can even plant his own mixtures outside of Israel on purpose. So I think we can reason a fortiori that your friend is allowed to keep his vegetables when he ...


4

The simplest explanation for this concept is "Like a blind man (finding) in a trap door (in an attic)" To expand on that: much like a blind man cannot find his way out of a room without help*, and if he did it by himself it was just pure luck, so too are these שחיטות that came out good -- you can't use these to prove that someone who doesn't know הלכות ...


3

this was posed to Rabbi Zev Leff, a well known halachic authority in Israel: The suicide bombing Moslems, who do their dastardly deed "in the name of G-d", truly believe that what they are doing is right. They feel like they are being mekadesh shem shamayim (Sanctifying G-d's name) by murdering as many Jews as they can while making the ultimate ...


3

It's not so straightforward that "out of fear" means that he was forced. Rambam (Hil. Avodah Zarah 3:6) explains "out of love" to mean that he is attracted by the beauty of the statue, and "out of fear" as that he thinks that it has the power to harm him (which doesn't necessarily mean that he accepts it as a god, just as a power of some kind). Though it is ...


2

The Taz (OC 196 sk 1) rules that one who ate something prohibited (even Biblically) by accident is allowed to say an after bracha, as it is no worse than one who eats prohibited foods when forced to because of pikuach nefesh which the Shulchan Aruch already rules (OC 196:2) do get blessings. The Mishna Berurah (sk 4) quotes this Taz approvingly, but the ...


2

Intention matters... but so do the circumstances and the reason for the patur. In the case of the Sukkah, we do not eat in the rain because it is unpleasant. If you find eating in the rain during sukkot unpleasant, then you should not eat in the sukkah even if you aren't eating even when it isn't raining. If, however, you normally don't eat in the Sukkah, ...


2

The strings for Tzitzit (whether they will be white or blue) need to be spun for the express purpose of use in Tzitzit. Some say the material needs to be carded for the express purpose of Tzitzit as well, but most are lenient about this. (Shulchan Aruch OC 11:1)


2

As far as I know, the process is exactly the same as when you first put it up and should be done promptly. The only discussion surrounds whether a new blessing is recited. Pitchei Teshuva (YD 289:1) compares the case to one whose Tallit fell off unexpectedly who needs to recite a new blessing upon redonning it (Shulchan Aruch OC 8:14). The Aruch HaShulchan (...


2

Shulkhan Arukh 329:3 says that for a safek pikuach nefesh we violate Shabbat even in a situation where there are many safekot combined. In fact, if this were not the case, the doctor wouldn't be able to carry his phone on Shabbos at all! Presumably the reason the doctor is carrying his phone is because there is a significant chance that he could be ...


2

Try Fugue? Fugue: a state or period of loss of awareness of one's identity, often coupled with flight from one's usual environment, associated with certain forms of hysteria and epilepsy. Wikipedia Article


2

Zadon Shabbos, knowing that it's Shabbos, does not mean that he knows every aspect of Shabbos. It means he knows that it's Shabbos. As Rashi heichi mashkachas lah says, that he knows it's Shabbos. The only thing is that too know it's Shabbos, you need to know at least one biblical law, or else in what way do you know it's Shabbos? We see later in the gemara, ...


2

I heard this from Rabbi Eli Mansour: Pnina was a tzadeket a wife of a tzadik! she was doing this so Hanah would pray with more kavanah and tears, which two conditions known to be accepted by hashem in a prayer faster. That being said, she was punished anyway because out of her good intentions, she secretly came to enjoy it, hence she lost all her children. ...


1

I suggest oblivion. Wiktionary's first definition is: The state of forgetfulness or distraction; fig. confused It seems to me that the distracted kind of forgetfulness is the phenomenon discussed in the laws of Sabbath. Wiktionary notes: (usually uncountable, plural oblivions) Although this word is usually not treated as discrete instance, it ...


1

The Hebrew word itself only means "disappearance" (as in, from his conscious mind/memory) which means it needs to be interpreted contextually even in the original. If you are looking for a translation that incorporates the contextual explanation, perhaps try: "dismissal from mind" or "act of forgetting/disremembering" (or "disrememberance" if you're not ...


1

I heard from Rav Gershon Meltzer a posek in yeshivas Mir that if you had intention to put it back on its not called a hefsek. Same issue with repeating birchas hatorah since you intend to wake soon after. He waif at most its a safek and safek brachos lekula. He suggested to sleep in them none theless in order to accommodate all opinions Note this site is ...


1

I'm not sure if this answers the question, but while the messenger may not realize that he's being מזכה לחבירו שלא בפניו, he is certainly aware that he's a messenger. Tosfos there (Gitin 11 ד"ה התופס לבעל חוב, and see also Tosfos to Kesuvos 11a) actually write that זכין works in a manner exactly like שליחות - so one could easily imagine that דעת שליחות is ...


1

There are other distinctions, but the biggest one is that a Torah must be written "lishmah" -- with intent. Matza actually doesn't have to be "made" lishma, but must be "guarded" lishmah. If I stand watch over the machine, it may not be my action, but I'm still guarding it. There are other distinctions, for instance the additional level of intent required ...


1

I think that there are two general approached to why the Nazir brings a chatas upon completion of his nezirus: One opinion in the Gemara (Taanis 11a), R. Elazar Hakapr, does state that the nazir is regarded as a sinner and brings a sacrifice to atone for his sin. The gemara states that the nazir's sin is that 'he abstained from wine', an opinion taken up ...


1

Wikipedia seems to have done a good job (my emphasis) Attitudes toward Nazirites The nazirite is called "holy unto the Lord" (Numbers 6:8), but at the same time must bring a sin-offering (Numbers 6:11) and his sins are explicitly referred to ("and make atonement for that which he sinned"). This apparent contradiction, pointed out in the ...



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