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8

Shulchan Aruch Yoreh Deah 298:1 אין אסור משום כלאים, אלא צמר רחלים ואילים עם פשתן. אבל צמר גמלים וצמר ארנבים ונוצה של עזים וכל שאר מינים, מותרים בפשתן. The only thing forbidden because of Shaatnez is sheep and ram wool with linen; camel wool, rabbit wool, goat hair, or other similar items are permitted with linen. The rule that only sheep and ram ...


7

Per Shatnez Testers of America and Chabad.org no. When we speak of wool, we are only referring to wool obtained from sheep or lambs. Other materials, such as camel's hair, mohair, angora, cashmere or alpaca wool, present no shatnez problems.


7

An individual's mezuzah has to be checked twice in seven years. A community's mezuzah has to be checked twice in fifty years. Yoreh Deah 291:1. You have to check them even if you don't assume they are pasul. In fact, even if you check three mezuzos, you still have to check all of the others (Pischei Teshuvah 291:1).


7

After doing a google search, I found this excellent, well sourced piece from the OU. According to the article, written by rabbi Dovid Bistricer, poskim fall on both sides of the issue. Those in favor of using microscopes to "change" the halacha: R' Yaakov Emden (She'ilas Yaavetz 2:124) allowed microscopes to check for insects in rice, forbidding that ...


6

Halacha does not require us to check for bugs unless a product has a halachic certainty of having bugs (chazaka- which may require checking mideoraisa) or commonly has bugs (matzui, which requires checking miderabanan). The best possible method to do a large amount of lettuce is to create a halachic certainty that there are no bugs (a chazaka) by checking 3 ...


6

Here is an article that discusses checking tefillin. See the article for more details and sources: Once Tefillin are known to be Kosher, they Halachically never need to be checked, assuming they are worn regularly. If they are worn infrequently they must be checked 2 times in 7 years. Shulchan Aruch (Orech Chaim 39:10) However, the Aruch Hashulchan says ...


5

http://www.shemayisrael.com/parsha/feinhandler/archives/chayeisa.htm The Chofetz Chaim sighed deeply and said, "I too am a person who makes mistakes. You know that I sell my books. Sometimes the binder misplaces a page, or a page might be missing or have unclear print. Even though I am careful to check every book before it is sold, there still ...


5

According to strict Halacha, Tefilin does not have to be inspected ever. Proof of this is a Yerushalmi Eruvin 59 Halacha 2 from Hillel Hazakain. In the Teshuvos HaGeonim it says that so long it is being used constantly there is no need to check, however if it is only used from time to time it should be checked twice every 7 years like Mezuzus. HaRav ...


5

The Mishna in Kelayim Perek 9 says that those that sell Shatnez are allowed to try it on in order to model it to the Purchaser. According to this Shita you would be allowed to try it on prior to purchasing. However we do not Pasken like that. The Heter to try it on is based on Rov, since most clothing is not Shatnez, and as it is not yours you can not check ...


5

About bugs - the halacha is that you cant eat it if it is large enough to be visible to the naked eye. This is regardless of whether it is camouflaged or hidden. If a mashgiach can see a small black spec that could be a piece of dirt, or could be a bug. It is large enough to be visible, so if it is a bug, then you can't eat it (and a light box or ...


5

I know that R' Avraham Blumenkrantz zt"l wrote very sharply (in his annual Pesach guide) against what he called the "commercialization" of checking for bugs, the standards for which, he argued, are inadequate. With that said, though, it may just depend on whether you have the necessary qualities (patience and sharpness of eyesight, among others) to do a ...


4

http://shatnez.n3.net/ Here are a few: Carpets/Rugs: May require testing. Wool carpets (wall-to-wall) and area rugs may be backed or reinforced with linen. Non-woolen rugs and carpets are not a problem. Services are available at most shatnez laboratories for those who wish to have their carpets tested. Linen and Linen-look fabrics: Require testing. ...


4

See this answer. Those rabbis who prohibit aborting a fetus even if it has Downs, Tay-Sachs, or the like, strongly frown upon testing for such things if there's nothing you can do about it -- or you'll put yourself in a situation where it will take superhuman strength to follow halacha.


4

This depends on the Hashgacha. Some Hashgachot on broccoli are only signing off on the purposefully present ingredients and processing equipment, but are not addressing the requirement for Bedika (Triangle-K for example on a lot of frozen produce (See here)). Others are signing off that they indeed already performed a Bedika (typically via Chazaka) and ...


3

Although the other answers mentioned that cashmere may be mixed with linen as it comes from the Kashmir goat, practically this is not true. That is because cashmere by itself is a very expensive material. Each goat can only produce about 4 ounces of fibers a year and it is estimated that fleece from 4 to 6 animals would be needed for a sweater. Because of ...


3

The Aruch HaShulchan (291:1) says that in a place which is exposed to the elements and moisture or rot are common, one should check more often than twice in seven years and at least once a year. He notes that this was his personal practice.


3

The unequivocable answer is - no! if they can not be seen by the naked eye, they are not considered to exist period. Interesting I just saw another great article by the author of the photogrey issue on this exact topic - with dozens (if not more) of sources - here's the link - http://ohr.edu/this_week/insights_into_halacha/5043 this rabbi spitz must really ...


3

I think generally speaking, if you'd reasonably believe it could contain wool or linen. I heard something about baseball mitts being a problem? Anyone hear of this? From what I've heard, a garment that's entirely cotton and/or synthetic is incredibly unlikely to contain both wool and linen (but men's suits could still have lining or padding or the like ...


3

Rav Aaron Abadi writes: "Don't listen to the rumors. There is no need to check for Shaatnez on any article of clothing unless you're sure there's shaatnez in there. For all those who need to know.... Shaatnez according to some Rishonim requires "Shua, Tavi, and Nuz all together." We don't have that today. So according to those Rishonim, today's Shaatnez is ...


2

I think the accepted opinion holds that by an issur one should be choshesh for a "miut ha'motzoi", which I think R.H. Schachter defines as around 10%. So if you think the suit has a greater than 10% chance of being shatnez, you should get it checked. If so, I think only certain higher-end wool suits would be an issue. Some might hold one should check it even ...


2

He would have to check it if he is going to make a bracha on it. One solution to this problem is too declare ownerless your share in the Shul's tallit thereby making the tallit a borrowed tallit which is not obligated in tzitzit. This way it doesn't matter if they are invalid and you won't be making a bracha anyway. (Sources: Mishna Brurah 13 sk 15, 8 sk ...


2

As always, CYLOR. But here's what I found while looking around the web: From here: 330. The outside leaves of lettuce which are not fit for eating may be taken off on Shabbos in order to reach the good leaves, provided that this is done just before the meal. Lettuce leaves may be examined on Shabbos to make sure there are no insects on them. Insects ...


2

As Rav Herchel Schachter notes at approximately the 26:30 mark in this shiur, Rav Shlomo Zalman Aurbach clarified the halacha of checking twice every seven years, that it is not the case nowadays. The twice-in-seven-years requirement was stated when the situation was heat extremes. But nowadays, where we have air conditioning in the summer and steam in the ...


1

You should CYLOR for a final ruling, but it seems (Shach and Taz to YD 84:13, Chochmat Adam 52:9, see also Rama OC 553:3 (however see Shu"t R Akiva Eiger 76)) there should be no problem blending the fruit as the intention is to prepare the food not to nullify the insects. Once the insects are cut up, they are nullified in the mixture (YD 101:6). ...


1

Per Yalkut Yosef when you purchase clothing from a non Jew you have to inspect them for Shaatnez even if the non Jew insists there is no linen threads. However if linen threads are significantly more expensive then one may rely on that fact. If one supplied the material to a non Jew we are not afraid that he will switch the goods, since it can be checked. ...


1

From Rav Aaron Abadi (here): "There is no need to check for Shaatnez on any article of clothing unless you're sure there's shaatnez in there. For all those who need to know.... Shaatnez according to some Rishonim requires "Shua, Tavi, and Nuz all together." We don't have that today. So according to those Rishonim, today's Shaatnez is only derabanan. When ...


1

According to many, if a mezuzah is doen overnight a new bracha is made. However, Rav Blau is Chovas hadar and harav Ovadia Yosef state that a new bracha is made if even down for a few hours. It is important to note where each mezuzah came from so it could be put back in the same place. Much more important that the kabbalistic reason mentioned, is that there ...


1

The Gemara (Ketubot 9) says that if you say know something is Asur, even though the Torah says it is Mutar, it is Asur. For example, if there are two Edim that say that the meat from "X Shechita Center" is kosher and you walk in and see they are shooting the cows in the head instead of "shechting" them, you are a not allowed to eat it even though everyone ...



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