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6

The 13 principles of faith found at the end of the morning service are a revised version of Rambam's more detailed formulation of the of Foundations of the Faith, which he published in his commentary to the Mishna, as an introduction to Perek Chelek in Sanhedrin. This being the case, it is always worthwhile to check the original regarding any questions about ...


6

Based on the notion of R. Saadia Gaon, found in Emunos V'Deos 8:5. that the MBY is not a sure thing, I'll go with MBD. http://www.sichosinenglish.org/books/mashiach/11.htm "Quite significantly, R. Saadiah Gaon (one of the few to elaborate on the role of Mashiach ben Yossef) notes that this sequence is not definite but contingent! Mashiach ben Yossef ...


5

The הגדה שלמה - (one of Rav M. M. Kasher's 3 Hagadot) says: From [Machzor?] Vitri ולפי שהוציא את עצמו מן הכלל של עבודת הקב"ה כפר בעיקר: שכל ככופר במצוותיו כאלו כפר בו כדכתיב ועשיתם את כל מצותי וסמיך ליה אני ה' א-לקיכם


5

To answer one of your questions: R' Yaakov Weinberg is quoted as saying that knowledge (axiom #10) could not necessarily be derived from reward & punishment (#11), as G-d could have been construed as a "harmonious watchmaker" who constructed the Universe as a machine that automatically senses evildoing and applies punishment, without conscious control by ...


5

The Ikarim where 13 principles during the time of Rambam, that could be used to differentiate Judaism from Christianity, Islam and other popular beliefs at the time. During the Rambam's time, religious wars were gaining a status of their own, and the Jewish people were being seen as a religion rather than a nation in exile. These Ikarim were needed to help ...


4

R' Yaakov Weinberg in Fundamentals and Faith explains that the resurrection of the dead implies a profound and fundamentally necessary understanding of the relationship between the body and the soul. The body could be viewed as a vessel, which is shed at the end of your life and is now a thing of the past, while your soul is "you." Resurrection is what ...


4

It is part of the fundamental principle of yichud Hashem - that not only is there only one God, but God alone has full control of the the world and His will reigns supreme. The Ramchal starts off klach pitchei chachma discussing this. (See also Daat Tevunot). There he explains that everything in the world, (even what a human being does with free will such ...


4

A non-Jew who keeps the seven Noahide laws because they were commanded by Moses has a share in the world to come. As a non-Jew, he is not commanded to keep the other mitzvot. Source: Maimonides, Mishneh Torah, Laws of Kings (Hilkhot Melakhim) 8:11.


3

An excerpt from Fundamentals and Faith (based on teachings of R' Yaakov Weinberg, written by Rabbi Mordechai Blumenfeld): It would seem, then, that "awaiting him" should be understood as attributing to him so much importance that one is aware of missing something, of lacking something every moment of one's life. It is not enough to know and believe in ...


3

There are 2 gemaras that you may be thinking of. Bekhorot 30b says: ת"ר הבא לקבל דברי חבירות חוץ מדבר אחד אין מקבלין אותו עובד כוכבים שבא לקבל דברי תורה חוץ מדבר אחד אין מקבלין אותו ר' יוסי בר' יהודה אומר אפי' דקדוק אחד מדברי סופרים. Soncino translates: Our Rabbis taught: If one is prepared to accept the obligation of a haber except one religious ...


2

Abarbanel, in his defense of the Rambam's choices of principles, says that the work ikar, unlike the word yesod which is a foundation, means a very important belief. The Rambam describes it as a list of yesodos and ikarim, some which are necessary foundations and some which are important but not necessarily central. The Rambam writes in his postscript to ...


2

In his "Historical Note on the 13 Principals", Rabbi Chaim Miller explains that the Rambam's 13 principals of faith were a response to the influence Aristotle's philosophy was having on the Jewish Community (having recently been translated into Arabic). In footnote 15 of page 327, he bring the Abarbanel (Rosh Amanah Chapter 10) who says that the order of ...


2

The question assumes that the Ikkar is independent of a generic Messianic age. Rather the Ikkar is about it being fundamental to believe in a Messianic age. The Ikkar is: 1) That the complete fulfillment of Torah and Mitzvos is the purpose of the world. 2) That G-d will ultimately make that happen through Moshiach. 3) To want that to happen. If someone ...


2

Before discussing why or why not something should be an ikkar/principle, we first need to know what the principles are in the first place. I answer that here: What are Rambam's "עיקרים"? Discussion of this question should begin with noting that the Gemara itself asks this very question in the very beginning of Perek Cheilek (Sanhedrin 90a): ...


2

It would seem that he agrees with the Ramban's explanation of the verse. אנכי ה - I am the First Cause that made everything - אלקיך - who is your ruler that you are obligated to serve. He goes on to say that "Who took you out" negates the Kadmus HaOlam, as it shows that He can change nature.


1

As far as the Talmud goes? The law within it is binding, and its legal interpretations of Biblical verses are of Biblical force.


1

"Orthodox" as a label originated as a slur for the traditionally observant by the new Reform movements of the 19th century (Samson Raphael Hirsch, Religion Allied to Progress, in JMW. p. 198). Presumably, what you're asking is what beliefs are assumed to be incompatible with a Torah lifestyle even amongst the more open-minded of Torah personalities that ...


1

Of course how you answer this depends on how you view the purpose of the Ikkarim. Following the view that you attributed to the Chasam Sofer, Rabbi Yoel Kahn (in the series I referenced in the comments there, and summarized here (hat tip)) gives a simple metaphor. It would be like a soldier in a war not caring to win the war he is participating in. He can ...


1

perhaps by "eino mechake" the rambam does not mean simply "wait for" but rather that one does not "wait for him because he gave up hope of him ever coming" as the rambam continues שהרי תורה העידה עליו which implies he doesn't believe it will happen despite that the torah says so.


1

I guess the simplest answer to this question is that anyone who truly understand what the Messianic Era is like, according to the Torah and prophets, could not possibly want to continue living in the diaspora. The only possible explanation for why someone would rather live without Mashiach is that he doesn't actually believe (or understand) what Mashiach is ...


1

After some consideration, I think the straight forward answer for the Rambam is as follows. The Rambam holds that the purpose of the times of Moshiach is to do Mitzvos to merit Olam Haba. That works nicely for those who will live then, but what about those who lived before? With what will they merit Olam Haba? For that, the answer is Techiyas HaMeisim. ...


1

I'll say at the outset this answer will be a little interesting, as it is using Kabbalah to answer the Rambam, but it helps be Mekayim R. Weinberg's answer (although it doesn't quite agree with it, I don't think) and provide another approach to this question. The Tzemach Tzedek writes: הנה באלשיך פ' זו הביא משארז"ל בפ' בראשית שבעלילה בא הקב"ה על אדה"ר ...


1

The answer is, of course, going to depend on what makes something an Ikar, but I have a suggestion: The Ramban in Sha'ar Hagemul explains why it is according to the Rambam that resurrection is at all necessary if the body won't be there for long anyways: אבל אחרי כן יגזור הרב ז"ל מיתה על המשיח ועל דורו, ויהיו נפשותיהם בטוב העולם הבא, בלא גוף, כמו שהיו ...


1

The wicked son says מה העבודה הזאת לכם, which basically means "Why are you bothering with this stupidity" as the Yerushalmi says "למה אתם טורחים את כל הטרחה הזאת כל שנה ושנה". Essentially, this is a denial of the binding character of the laws of the Torah on all the Jews, which is clearly a violation of one of the basic principle of Judaism.


1

Most of the haggadah texts that I have seen have the form without the 'and' וּלְפִי שֶׁהוֹצִיא אֶת־עַצְמוֹ מִן הַכְּלָל, כָּפַר בָּעִקָּר Chabad translates this as The wicked son, what does he say? "What is this service to you?"7 [By saying,] "to you," [he implies]: "but not to himself." Since he has excluded himself from the people at large, he ...


1

Several approaches exist to answering this question (which is asked, by the way, in Shut Radvaz 1:334 and the Chosam Sofer in Y.D. 356) The Classic Academic approach is to deny the ikkarim's theological importance, and instead see a political one: in order to be granted certain status in Muslim lands, Rambam had to show that the Jews are monotheists and not ...



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