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6

Beeswax itself does not pose any inherent kashrus problem. From the OU website: Beeswax is a substance secreted from glands in bees’ abdomen. Bees use this wax to create the honeycombs in which they store honey. Beeswax is used in foods as a coating to fruits to extend their shelf life, to give a shine to round candies such as chocolates, jelly beans and ...


6

Taamei HaMinhagim 706 says it is done for Kabalistic reasons. In the notes, he mentions in the name of the Imrei Noam that the Gematria of the word "Tapuach" (the Hebrew word for apple) is the same as the Gematria of "S'e Akeida" - so we eat the apple to recall the Akeida (Binding of Isaac).


5

Maybe indeed honey will penetrate into organic material and dissolve it, but only some distance. With a small creature like a bee, then, that's enough to include its entire body; with a human corpse, the bulk of it will still remain intact. The issue is discussed in Shulchan Aruch, Yoreh De'ah 84:12 and commentaries there. The Mechaber writes that "honey ...


5

There is specific symbolism in the apple. It also can't be discounted that apples are harvested around Rosh Hashana time so they are a readily available and relatively inexpensive fruit at that time.


5

1) The Maharil explains that the apple is connected with "חקל תפוחים קדישין"; when Yaakov came to get the brochos from Yitzchok, he had the smell of an apple orchard upon his clothing. Besides for the Kabbilistic meanings, (according to one opinion) this episode happened on Rosh Hashana (GR”A O.C. 583:8) 2) There are three types of benefit derived from an ...


4

According to Halacha we follow Rav Sheishes's view (bechoros 7b) who holds like Rabbe Yaakov (the Tannah) that the reason honey is kosher (even if the bee extracts part of its flesh into the honey as part of the process - Rabeinu Gershom) is a Gzeiras Hakosuv (by Hashem's command) and not like the opinion who says that the reason for its permissiblity is ...


4

Use dryer sheets. I personally use Bounce brand sheets. Hang one for every 10 cubic feet or so, in a very bee infested area. You probably won't need that many though. Adjust according to bee count. (PS. With the dryer sheets hung on some of the decorations, we actually leave honey out. Its amazing!


3

Honey instead of sugar is simply a minhag. Sephardim don't typically use honey and instead use sugar. The apple is cooked in sugar by sephardim(Sefer Ben Ish Hai Year 1 Parashat Nizzavim 4).


3

The Encyclopedia Talmudis has a complete article on bee honey (under dvash) and why it is kosher. As part of the article it shows the difference between bee honey and milk of a nonkosher animal. The honey is carried by "baskets" outside the bee and is processed by "external" processing. That is, it is chewed by the bee, mixed with saliva and regurgitated. It ...


3

The ibn Ezra story is about a bee (which has no flesh) dissolving into honey, the Gemara is about human flesh.


2

Sorry. Put bee traps a bit away from your sukkah. Use liquor or unsweetened iced tea for kiddush during the daytime, instead of wine or grape juice.


2

Remove the honey right after dipping. If you have many guests, you could keep it covered until the person dips his bread, then close the honey. You could also put a net on the door.


2

Apple was the most widely known fruit. Think of the other fruits and vegetables that are called after the apple eg orange in Hebrew, potatoe in Hebrew, French and German, pineapple in English. See here "In Middle English and as late as 17c., it was a generic term for all fruit other than berries but including nuts (e.g. O.E. fingeræppla "dates," lit. ...


2

We wish to have a sweet year. We symbolize this with sweet food: apples, honey. Thus, no pun is necessary. A pun is necessary for, say, leek, since it lacks sweetness. Dates would, I suppose, not need a pun, since they're sweet — but we can get a pun in, too, so we do. Source: my own conjecture.


2

The honey has been around at least since the times of the Ge'onim; see Otzar HaGe'onim to Rosh HaShanah 32b (p. 53). Footnote ח (ad loc.) suggests that the Agudah had a version of a responsum from the Geonim which explicitly mentioned the custom of apples and honey. Either way, the custom definitely dates back at least to the days of the Agudah, who died in ...


2

two chiddushim of my own that I have not seen elsewhere. the pyre on the mizbeach is described as an apple. We are adjured not to offer up honey on the mizbeach because no man can stand it, but l’atid lavo we will be able to offer up honey on the mizbeach - so our tefillah is that the year should be sweet enough for us to do so and thus we dip the apple in ...


1

The Encyclopedia Talmudis has a complete article on bee honey (under dvash) and why it is kosher. As part of the article it shows the difference between bee honey and milk of a nonkosher animal. While nectar is carried in the "honey stomach" of the bee to the hive, it is converted by "external" processing into honey. The article pointed to by @Shokhet shows ...


1

My last answer wasn't clear, so although I am loath to rewrite answers that have been voted on already, I'll try to make this a bit clearer. The Talmud has two opinions as to why bee honey is Kosher. Only one of them relies on the way in which bees make honey. The other says it is a "gezeras hakasuv" - an arbitrary distinction made in the Torah - which ...


1

I have heard that bugs don't like wind, including wind generated by fans. If you can get a running fan into your sukka, it could deter bugs from visiting.


1

See Ran Avoda Zar 16b on dafi harif, after mishna. The Gemara says if you add stuff to honey it ruins. The Rans 2nd phsat there


1

Summary Of Matzav ANswers to Signifigance of Apple and Honey 1.Maharil-Yitzchok smelled an apple orchard when Yaakov to receive the Brachos. The Vilna Gaon in the Biur HaGra says that this happened on Rosh HaShanah. The Ben Ish Chai says apples give three pleasures Smell, Appearance and Taste which correspond to three Brachos we’d like to receive Bini ...


1

They didn't have refined sugar in Talmudic times. In fact, as Rashi points out, "Dvash" could in some contexts simply mean anything sweet.



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