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14

You have to get dressed in the way that your naked areas won't be exposed. You aren't allowed to say, "I am in my innermost room; who can see me?" G-d can see you. Shulchan Aruch, Orach Chaim 2:1-2.


7

In the Sheilos U'Teshuvos of the Maharsham (Rabbi Shalom Mordechai Shvadron) Chelek 4 Siman 146 he writes to a Rabbi in the city of Leipzig the following (my own translation with added clarifications): To answer your letter from the 2nd day of Chanuka, if it is permissible to light the Chanuka candles on the train - I did not find the matter to be so ...


6

David Rosen of Emory University School of Law writes as follows on page 44. Regarding destruction of homes of living terrorists these actions seem easy to justify under Jewish Law. Ezra 10:8 mentions confiscation of property as a criminal sanction when one disobeys lawful orders. The court, under the biblical commandment, may expropriate ...


5

I go to college and lived with a gentile roommate last semester, and I wish I had someone as considerate; but, let's get started. Obviously make sure to be considerate on Shabbat by leaving the bathroom light on and avoiding any sort of problem that must be solved by breaking one of the Shabbat rules. For example, don't leave something of importance that she ...


5

From Aish.com When a Jew and non-Jew share a house, each having his own designated room or area, then a mezuzah is not posted on the common doorway. (Rama Y.D. 286:1 with Pitchei Teshuva 3)


5

The Rambam writes (Hilchot Kilaim 1:4) אין אסור משום כלאי זרעים, אלא זרעים הראויין למאכל אדם; אבל עשבים המרים, וכיוצא בהן מן העיקרין שאינן ראויין אלא לרפואה, וכיוצא בהן--אין בהן משום כלאי זרעים.‏ The prohibition of Kilei Zeraim (mixed seeds) only applies to seeds [of plants] which are human food. Bitter herbs and other herbs which are only used for ...


4

Check out the Nefesh B'Nefesh Community Database which lets you search according to a number of criteria. Off the top of my head (and if you're sure Ramat Beit Shemesh is out), from the information you give you might want to look into Yad Binyamin, Modiin, Moshav Matisyahu, Nof Ayalon, Efrat/Alon Shvut/Neve Daniel


4

(I found all these sources in Nit'ei Gavriel on Aveilus ch. 32 footnote 1.) A "Chanukas HaBayis" is an old custom first mentioned (though not by name) in the midrash (Tanchuma Bereishis 2 et. al.). The Radak (Shorashim, חנך) writes that "it is a minhag to have a meal and happiness at the first eating that they eat in the new house." The Maharshal (Yam ...


4

There are Jewish communities which have the custom that if a tragedy happened in a home, the current owners will move out. This is based on the Rabbinic expression "one who changes his location changes his luck". However, there is no reason for somebody else not to move into such a home. In Jerusalem - and other predominantly Jewish areas - such homes are ...


3

I happened to have been reading the part of the Talmud (Tractate Pesachim) just yesterday where it discusses the issue of chametz (leaven) owned by a non-Jew who rents a residence (even a room) in the home of a Jew. There are three source mitzvot in the Torah that are of concern here (I'm eliding them): "…yet on the first day you shall remove leaven from ...


3

Shulchan Aruch Orach Chayim 240:4 (The Kitzur Shulchan Aruch of R' Ganzfried (150:5) quotes him verbatim, and I'm quoting the translation of the Kitzur by R' Eliyahu Touger): It is forbidden to look at a woman's genitalia. Any person who looks at a woman's genitalia has no shame and violates the charge [Micha 6:8] "Walk modestly with your God." Going ...


3

However if you have two separate entrances to the home (like a front door and side door) how do you determine where the entry of the room truly is? Other doors don't matter; you evaluate mezuzah placement at each door independently. For each doorway, apply the rules given in this answer, which boil down to considerations of traffic flow, which room is ...


2

One option is Ramat Bet Shemesh. It might also be quite expensive by now, but the newer projects might be in your ballpark. It is very diverse and has TONS of English-speaking people. There is also an English-speaking community in Moshav Matityahu. There are also more "Modern Orthodox" English-speaking communities in Efrat, Maale Adumim, and to a lesser ...


2

My understanding is this: The ideal is to publicize the miracle to people outside. (However, Lubavitch custom varies.) This is accomplished by placing the m'nora just outside an outside door, or just inside a door or window so it is visible from the outside. However, as noted in the question, visibility is restricted to twenty amos up, so this doesn't work ...


2

According to (unattributed?) notes in the Soncino edition, "closed" doesn't necessarily mean entirely sealed. Here's what they've got: First the text: Abaye said to Rabbah, Something which supports you was taught: A closed house has four cubits; if one had broken open its door-frame, it does not receive four cubits.7 A closed house [room] does not ...


2

IIRC it's the text shmiras shabbos kehilchasa that allows you to use an ordinary plunger -- but not a professional-grade one -- to plunge a clogged toilet even on shabbos. So you'd certainly be allowed to do so on Chol HaMoed. As for using a professional-grade plunger ... I don't have a source.


2

I phoned a rabbi — probably one of the top ten rabbis in my city (a North American city of three million people). He's a charedi Ashkenazi rabbi. He said I can unblock it using a plunger, since it's unskillful work.


2

I have done this several times in the past. In viewing the Mishnah Brurah, now, I discovered several things that I was unaware of. As there are many laws regarding blowing / hearing the shofar, what I am providing may be a partial list, only: 589:3 - a woman is exempt from hearing the shofar b/c it is a time bound mitzvah. The mechaber states that they ...


1

The Ramban at the end of pasuk 3 writes that he sat them outside under the tree to catch a breeze. He recognized they were travelers and wouldn't want to stay so out of respect to them he offered water to wash their weary feet and sat them outside for the breeze and didn't bring them indoors to his tent.


1

During the first time he went into "Yaakov's tesnt" because he was the main person that he suspected. When he went back, since he had already searched Yaakov's posessions completely, he had realized that he had not been thorough enough with Rachel's possessions. Apparently he first suspected Yaakov, then Leah as the "first wife". He then realized that Rachel ...


1

Yalkut Yosef YD 285 Seif 89 says the head of household can appoint a shaliach to affix all the mezuzot. However, the shaliach should make the bracha of "Al Keviat Mezuzah", because whenever a Misvah is done on behalf of someone else, you change it to that form. I don't see any circumstance where the visitor won't be appointed a shaliach- is he going to ...


1

While I am not a rabbi, the general rule is that you don't flat out ignore a mitzvah unless there is some actual danger involved. If it is the mezuzah you are worried about, there are -- as has already been mentioned -- ways to protect them. You can get waterproof mezuzah cases in either metal or plastic. As a sofer, I don't recommend the aluminum ones for ...


1

The Sefer HaChaim [3:3 (by Rabbi Chaim ben Betzalel - brother of the Maharal)] says, "Inviting your relatives (to your house) is in essence, is the main mitzvah of HaChnosas Orchim!"


1

You also have strong English speaking communities in Raanana and Netanya if you want the central area rather than the Jerusalem area


1

The kitchen (#4) combines 1, 2, and 3 as a de-facto eruv chatzerois. (Same for the other side.) See: http://www.yna.edu/archive/s_ask58e-04.html and http://belogski.blogspot.com/2007/07/carrying-on-shabbat-in-hotels-and.html People who live around a courtyard and all eat at one table, even if each has his own house, do not need a Eruv, because they are ...



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