Hot answers tagged

27

This is a very broad and deep topic; the whole book of Job struggles with bad things happening to good people. After a lot of talk (and Job's friends trying to be helpful by saying "oh Job, obviously it's punishment for some sin you did, silly boy", and both Job and G-d telling them to go jump in a lake), the conclusion appears to be that it's beyond human ...


12

I don't have a lot of time now, but just a few thoughts: If he presented himself to the Rabbi as a non-Jew looking to convert, I would expect a lukewarm response at best. This is because Judaism does not proselytize, and is not interested in accepting converts unless they are strongly motivated to join the Jewish people and accept all of the responsibilities ...


9

there is a world of difference. Judaism places man on the highest pedestal possible "In the 'image' of God He created man" (Genesis 1:27) Nazis viewed Jews as vermins and pests which must be exterminated. Likewise in Pirkei Avot chapter 3 regarding all of mankind: Rabbi Akiva used to say: Beloved is man that he was created in the image of G-d; an ...


9

The Lubavitcher Rebbe said to many survivors that from the Holocaust we see that one cannot rely on human feelings of morality. Until the Holocaust, many thought that the more cultured one was, the more intellectual one was, the more moral one would be. With the Holocaust, the entire Modern Western culture was shown to false. Scientists and Musicians either ...


9

The meshech chochmah, writing decades before the holocaust, describes the pattern of Jewish History. He explains how the Jews first arrive at a place and focus on Torah and mitzvos, but then later generations become comfortable, and begin slacking off in observance and forgetting they're in exile. Eventually this reaches the point that they are exiled again. ...


8

I know that one (perhaps the foremost one) urging that the Allies bomb the tracks was R' Michael Dov Weissmandl zt"l. If I recall correctly, he also urged that the camps themselves be bombed too; if that's true, then there you'd have a notable halachic authority who would permit (indeed advocate) this course of action.


8

According to Rabbi Herschel Welcher, "the majority by numbers and structure [rov minyan urov binyan]" of great rabbis concluded, post-Holocaust, that the world is too dangerous a place without a Jewish state. After several national calamities, there have been fervent Messianic hopes/expectations, which happened as well in the late twentieth century (mostly ...


7

Per this link http://www.torahlab.org/calendar/article/is_there_another_torah/ Today the Maharam’s Torah is in the Aron Kodesh of the famous Alt-neu shul in Prague.


6

Chayim K'halacha question 223 - Rabbi Boruch Shlomo Blizinsky - says a Kohain may go on the paths that lead to Auschwitz however may not enter the area where the incinerators are.


6

Your friend does not need to join the tribe, because he is already part of the Jewish people. I suggest that your friend read some introductory material to learn about Judaism. I am sure there are some good introductory books in German. The only good German books I know of are Horeb by Rabbi Shimshon Rafael Hirsch and 19 Letters, by the same author, but ...


6

Wikipedia deals with the question: The Chief Rabbinate of Israel, in 1949, under the guidance of Ben-Zion Meir Hai Uziel and Yitzhak HaLevi Herzog, decided that the Tenth of Tevet should be the national remembrance days for victims of the Holocaust. The Tenth of Tevet fast commemorates the siege of Jerusalem by Nebuchadnezzar II. For this day, it ...


6

Presenting a strictly Chareidi point of view on this site is like walking into a minefield, but here goes. There were definitely religious leaders who were against instituting a special day to commemorate the Holocaust, but not all gave their reasoning. One reason that was given came from Rabbi Gedalia Schor as quoted in Meged Givos Olam. The author there ...


5

To expand on Kordovero's answer, Victor Goldschmidt Verlag, based in Bâle, has a decent catalogue of works on Judaism, including the above mentioned works of R' Hirsch as well as translations of the Torah, Siddur (Sefat Emet - Rödelheim and Schma Kolenu), Machzorim, and other assorted works. They also carry ritual items, although those should wait until your ...


5

You are asking why bad things happen to good people if God is omnipotent and could therefore stop it. But if He does, then what happens to free will? This is too big a topic for a Q&A site. The topic you're looking for is called "theodicy".


5

I can't vouch for the reliability of this source, but the story is found in Warren Kozak, The Rabbi of 84th Street: The Extraordinary Life of Haskel Besser (HarperCollins, 2004), pp. 176-7 (cited in the Wikipedia article on the Shanghai Ghetto): When the Germans pressed the Japanese to turn over the entire Jewish community [in Shanghai], the Japanese ...


5

The main point of Smicha is to prove that you know Halacha. Many famous poskim (who didn't work as official city Rabbonim) didn't have Smicha until needed (by government etc.) Therefore, if one is knowledgeable enough to pasken, he should be able to pass a rudimentary Smicha test. If he doesn't, he can't pasken even if he has Smicha.


4

http://www.chabad.org/library/article_cdo/aid/332485/jewish/The-Holocaust.htm http://www.sichosinenglish.org/books/as-a-new-day-breaks/11.htm http://www.sichosinenglish.org/books/i-will-show-you-wonders/02.htm http://www.sichosinenglish.org/books/through-the-eyes-of-a-woman/44.htm The simple reason is that we don't know why because we have limited human ...


4

According to Rabbi Yissachar Shlomo Teichtal, author of Eim Habanim Smeicha, Hashem personally orchestrated it. For those unfamiliar with the book, he wrote it while hiding in Budapest, with all sources quoted from memory. He breaks from typical Chareidi thought and encourages aliyah. I will quote from the English translation, as that's the copy i own. It'...


3

Rabbi Ephraim Oshry's son is the Rov in a shul in my neighborhood. He told me a short time ago that the family was working on republishing his father's works. I don't know what the schedule is but I assume you can contact him directly to find out. The shul is Khal Beth Avrohom on East 17th Street in Brooklyn.


3

See here for an article by Howard Shultz, chairman of Starbucks, describing his meeting with Rabbi Nosson Tzvi Finkel, in which the latter teaches him "the lesson of the Holocaust." "Okay, gentlemen, let me tell you the essence of the human spirit. "As you know, during the Holocaust, the people were transported in the worst possible, inhumane ...


3

The Talmud, in discussing Iyov (Bava Basra 16b), quotes Rava: אין אדם נתפס בשעת צערו A person is not liable (lit. trapped) [for what he says] during a moment of pain.


2

In many ways the author of the article is correct. The holocaust is just one of many Jewish tragedies that ever after changed the course of Jewish history and Jewish practice. The article makes mention of the first of such historical events, such as the attack of Amalek against the Jewish people, which was the first time that the Jewish people were in a ...


2

Yevamot 61b: Mishnah: One may not desist from reproduction unless he has children. Bais Shamai say two males, Bais Hillel say one male and one female, as it says (Berashis ch. 5) “He created them male and female” Gemorah: Bais Shamai says: two males. What is the reason for Bais Shamai’s position? We learn from Moshe as it says (Divrai Hayamim 1 ch. 29) “...


2

January 27th is probably the most universally accepted non-Jewish holocaust remembrance day. It is the anniversary of the day that Soviet Troop liberated Auschwitz-Birkenau in 1945. It was designated by the UN in 2005 and as of 2004 at least 12 countries have some type of official observance on this day. Israel has designated this day, not as a holocaust ...


2

firstly all these sorts of persecutions were predicted in the torah. ex. "And the Lord will scatter you among all the nations, from one end of the earth to the other; And among those nations, you will not be calm, nor will your foot find rest" deut.28 secondly, on the contrary the fact that the jews survived more than all other nations despite being the ...


2

How about the Book of Lamentations? King Nebuchadnezzar? The Assyrians? Sennacherib? The Bar Kokhba rebellion being crushed? The Cossacks? ...Shall I go on? The Jews don't need life to always be positive in order to believe in "our Deity" and we certainly didn't need World War II to tell us that we are susceptible to the wiles of our enemies while being in ...


1

Displaying publicly an egregious lack of taste is a halachik problem - in fact it probably qualifies as a chilul hashem (desecration of G-d's name) about which the general halachik rule is yehareg v'al yaavor (martyrdom rather than violation). Not to mention the emotional distress caused survivors or their descendents (as noted by Ray in a comment) is also a ...


1

Why do we not say Hallel on Purim? It says in Megilla 14a that one of the reasons why Purim you do not say hallel is. "The miracle had no connection to the land of Israel, unlike the other holidays." (Look at the Gemorah or the link for more reasons why you do not say hallel on Purim which can connect to this question.)


1

I don't think its a question of chiyuv (obligation) but more of a moral feeling towards his students. When they heard that he is coming back they were probably inspired and rejuvenated etc. Which could of enabled his students to continue life. in addition noone really knew the real situation in Europe then.


1

This does not completely answer your question, but I see two parts in your question. One, why a new date, Yom HaShoah, was selected as opposed to established national days of mourning, i.e., tisha b'av, and two, why this particular date. As to the first question, and I don't have my sources available right now, although we do have established dates (the ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible