New answers tagged

1

According to my Lithuanian grandparents, Chelm was a joke name used to make fun of Kelm. The city of Chelm is located in Poland, while the city of Kelm (Kelmé) is located in Lithuania. I don't recall if a reason was given for the switching of names, whether it has to do with mocking Polish in general or whether it was simply a matter of mispronouncing the ...


0

A lady from Chelm mentioned in the Jewish Tribune about thirty years ago that it was very embarrasing telling people you were from Chelm when you went to Warsaw.


1

Maybe this would be better as a comment, but I'm not able to comment. The first thing I noticed when I saw a picture of the original seal (example) is the left wing covering a bit of the sun, which avoids (page 112) the prohibition to draw celestial bodies. If it was done intentionally, this would be strong evidence that, whatever his reasons for using the ...


2

3 Enoch is known in Jewish tradition under the name Sefer Hekhaloth. It is part of a wider body of texts known as Hekhaloth literature. This book is now considered one of the primary texts of kabbalah though it is technically, like Sefer Yesirah, pre-kabbalah and subject to interpretations that don't necessitate a kabbalistic metaphysic. At the time it was ...


4

In addition to the other answers, we have some evidence that blood did land on the veil in the Holy of Holies when the Kohein Gadol (High Priest) sprinkled it there on Yom Kippur, and that they weren't too good about cleaning it. The gemara in Meilah 17b quotes the sage R' Elazar Bar R' Yose as having seen the curtain in the treasury in Rome, and it had ...


7

To supplement, not supplant, Cauthon's good answer, I'll note that the mishna (Midos chapter 3) says that the altar and its ramp would be cleaned every Friday with a cloth, because of the blood. (This is Rabi's statement, but the commentaries note that he's explaining and not arguing on the other rabbi in the mishna.) (It's not completely clear to me ...


9

It is logical to think that the priests were careful, so that the blood only landed on the floor, and not on the actual curtains. Regarding Beit HaMikdash, the whole place was covered with aqueducts and water channels from the surrounding rivers/lakes. These would lead the blood (and other remains) outside. For example, the Mishna in Yoma 5, 6 talks about ...


5

The general scholarly answer is, "We don't really know." On linguistic grounds (i.e. an analysis of its language of Late Literary Jewish Aramaic) it is usually considered a "late" targum, i.e. having been composed between the fourth and sixth centuries CE, and some even push it as late as the seventh to ninth centuries CE. We certainly know nothing of the ...


-2

There are 2 'famous' Targums. One (the one you're referring to in the question) is known as Targum Yonasan. This is a bit of a 'loose' translation, oftentimes giving explanations in addition to simply translating the words. The Gemara is referring to that Targum, which G-D wanted to remain hidden. Another Targum (and this is arguably the more famous one, as ...


0

Hi I'm new here to answer the question. As in every field you go to the professionals which work, deals or research judaica, especially the field of Torah scrolls the have the ability to a certain extent even to say which person wrote the scroll if it's from somebody famous.


-2

So, are there any religious opinions stating the Exodus can be viewed as a 'meaningful story'? Proverbs 6:16-19 These six things doth the LORD hate: yea, seven are an abomination unto him: A proud look, a lying tongue, and hands that shed innocent blood, An heart that deviseth wicked imaginations, feet that be swift in running to mischief, A ...


0

My family tree on my mothers side and indeed my heritage can be traced back directly to King David of Israel of the Tribe of Judah ! King David of Israel / דוד המלך is my 99th great grandfather ! Obviously I am not alone... It is reckoned that there are about 8 million of us who have a similar heritage and this makes me feel very proud of who I am !


0

Generally speaking, there are two main approaches. Some say that saying that Chazal were wrong (in anything) can be close to epikorsut, while others say that they could have been wrong regarding anything that relates to sciences, history, etc., since their knowledge of these subjects was like any learned person's knowledge (the Rambam is a noted supporter of ...


-5

Civil Saturday/traditional Shabbat is not correct Shabbat day. The proper way to observe Shabbat is to follow the Moon cycles. Some Jewish (Philo) and non-Jewish commentators mention this opinion. This is because Bereshit 1:14 says that Moon is for "appointments" and Shabbat is one of the "appointments" (holy meetings - miqra qodesh - Vaikra 23). Vayikra ...


1

In the hakdama to Be'er HaGolah, the Maharal explains that the most intense kedusha (holiness) is always expressed in the smallest, or most condensed, manifestation in this world. Thus, the smaller the area of the mikdash (temple), the greater its level of kedusha. So too the Jewish people, as the holy nation, have the smallest manifestation in this world.


1

Rabbi Lawrence Kelemen, an acclaimed lecturer and teacher, has a class proving the veracity of the Oral Torah tradition, as well as dealing with a number of the main questions on the transmission of the Torah as we have it today. The class is freely available here. Additionally, Rabbi Yaakov Weinberg has a wonderful class addressing similar issues, freely ...


2

There are differences between texts of Tanach now and in the past. In fact, there are several different so-called "textual witnesses" of Tanach that exist, each of which has their own strengths and weaknesses. The textus receptus — received text of the Jews is the Masoretic text, whose ancestors are present in some form in some of the Dead Sea Scrolls and ...


-2

As the Hebrew scriptures I refered to show, there are those who would destroy the scriptures, but God promises to preserve it. What was the first thing God shows us that Satan said so long ago in the garden. He questioned God's word. Thus we have two "text types". 1) the supernaturally inspired and preserved holy scriptures 2) the changed, altered, messed up ...


0

The Jews never started out having a very large population. In fact, when you read the Torah you see that the entire nation of Yisroel coming out of Mitzrayim is numbered only 600,000 men! (Of course, the Yidden were just starting out.) Another reason, and probably a better one, is that the Holocaust greatly affected the population of Jews. Plus, you might ...


1

A lot of the late Second Temple schisms are still the subjects of hot debate. As I understand it, the only primary source we have on the Essenes is Josephus; leading some historians to question their existence. (Yes, Ethics of the Fathers does talk about the foolishness of a "what's mine is yours and yours is mine" philosophy, which Lord Sacks reads as a ...


3

Dvarim 7:7 and Dvarim 4:27 would be my guess. The LORD did not set His love upon you, nor choose you, because ye were more in number than any people—for ye were the fewest of all peoples And the LORD shall scatter you among the peoples, and ye shall be left few in number among the nations, whither the LORD shall lead you away.


2

According to this (It's a Google book, on p. 154 - in case link has a problem,) the first use of the Torah pointer in Europe was in Northern Italy dating back to the 15th century.


2

The earliest reference to its use is in connection with the schools of Bethar before the destruction of that place in the war of Bar Kokba (132-135). http://jewishencyclopedia.com/articles/15047-yad



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