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0

It seems to me that the issue was to uproot any supporters of Haman left in Shushan, especially within the government\palace. This is why she had Haman's son's hanged, and the people killed were probably affiliated with Haman's family. The purpose was to solidify Mordechai's position and to make sure the Jews would be secure for years to come.


0

I don't agree with the premise of the question: "...the Megilat Esther says the Jews of the city of Shushan (the capital) needed/took an extra day to fight for their survival. " Initially, after Haman was killed, permission was granted for the Jews to defend themselves on the 13th Adar - and to kill their enemies. For some reason, Esther asked for ...


2

Heliocentrism or geocentrism or whatever is entirely irrelevant to halachah; at most there is a question whether certain Biblical verses or aggadic comments correspond to (current scientific understanding of) the universe as it is, or reflect the way we perceive the world, similar to the continued use of the English words “sunrise” & “sunset”. That ...


1

from: http://www.straightdope.com/columns/read/1645/whats-the-origin-of-the-jewish-bread-challah Around the 15th Century, Ashkenazic Jews (in eastern Europe) developed the challah that we have today. It is thought that the braiding or twisting was a pun on twisting off the little piece of first dough as a reminder of the Temple sacrifices. The braided ...


9

This video that has been making the rounds on Jewish sites recently has a short scene of the Chafetz Chaim. https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&ei=v8DtVOjGFMr2gwTMnYJo&url=http://www.youtube.com/watch%3Fv%3D87XlDRjmPME&ved=0CCIQtwIwAg&usg=AFQjCNF5HsuWxhBNix7DOkNpWXs1abeNxQ&sig2=ZjesetY7leTfMNofGXk5aQ Here are some ...


3

The Chassam Sofer* says that accepting the fact that a king has been appointed by Hashem and has some of Hashem's glory is included in the fact that we must fear and honor a king as a point of fearing and honoring Hashem. There are indecent people who only fear the king in front of him, like someone who fears a robber, but in secret they mock him. This is ...


6

Rabbi Yonason Eibushutz answered humorously that disposing of two evil doers ( Bigsan and Teresh) is better than one ( Ahashverosh) The midrash (footnote 73) and Sefarim Chitzonum writes that Bigsan and Teresh were in cohoots with Haman. If Ahasverish was killed Haman would have taken his place. In that case it is clear that Ahasverosh is better than Haman. ...


4

According to Derech Eress, a book on the customs of Aleppo,the Jews used to celebrate 2 days of Purim out of Safek. ולכן נהגו לעשות פורים שני ימים, אלא שקוראים את המגילה בלי ברכה: וכן היה מנהג ארם צובה מימי קדם, שנהגו כל דיני פורים בשני הימים (וגם קראו בתורה בברכה - ורק על המגילה (לא בירכו, כאמור). מנהג זה המשיך אצל המוסתערבים (התושבים ...


5

Two Possible Answers: The Megillah states that Mordechai would stay by the gate to hear what was done to Esther. Possibly Mordechai was looking out for Esther's safety. It was common practice at the time for the king's wives to be killed after the assassination of the king. Another answer is based on the Medrash that Esther asked that Mordechai be ...


2

The names of the months came up with them from Bavel. Talmud Yerushalmi Rosh Hashana perek one, halacha two. This Yerushalmi is mentioned in Tosafos Rosh Hashana 7a, d.h. Midivrei. Most of the names are mentioned in megilas Esther and Nechemia. We can estimate then, at least to the latest possible date, based on Achashveirosh's reign. Wiki states ...


1

The original Hebrew months were numbered only. During the Babylonian exile (around 400CE), the Jew began to use names. See http://www.aish.com/atr/Names_of_Hebrew_Months.html


5

Pirkei Avos says: "Hevei mispallel b'shloma shel malchus" - Pray for the peace of the government. Even though there is no concept of lo ta'amod for Mordechai to adhere to, the assassination of the King would lead to severe sociopolitical upheaval. As subjects to the kingdom, it is our obligation to maintain, or at the very least pray for, the general order. ...


2

Kalonymus ben Kalonymus (13th-14th century) authored such a work entitled Masseket Purim, a parody for the Feast of Purim. (I think) I believe Immanuel the Roman (13th-14th century) authored a work of this genre as well entitled Makhberet Imanuel


4

Including those listen in the question, those who wrote on Kodshim include: Rashi (11th century) Maimonides (12th century Tosefos: Rabbeinu Yaakov (ר"י) Rabbeinu Yitzchok Ben Asher HaLevi (ריב"א) Rabbeinu Gershom comments on seven tractates: Bechoros, Kerisus, Me'ila, Temura, Chullin, Menachos, and Arachin. The Shita Mekubetzes writes on all tractates ...


5

No, there are no extant texts from Jewish scholars on meeting Mohammed. There has been much academic scholarship on the Jewish presence of Saudia Arabia during the formation of Islam. A good place to begin is The Jews of Arab Lands by the brilliant scholar Norman Stillman. But the history is complicated and this is a serious question, so the long answer that ...


6

One of the problems with the book of Joel is that it lacks any information that might locate it historically, and a number of pronouncements within it are ambiguous for that reason (eg: is the army in chapter 2 being likened to a plague of locusts, or is the plague of locusts in chapter 2 being likened to an army?). Rabbinic tradition has it that the author ...


3

The destruction of the temple was in ~70 CE and the Bar Kochba revolt was ~130 CE. Even if Yehudah Ben Beseira straddled the destruction, it would seem to be a stretch to call him a contemporary of Akiva. The Yerushalmi Talmud on the story in Pesachim 3b lists him only as Ben Beseira. Since presumably he was living in Israel at the time, this is more ...


-1

Tu Ba'Av was the DATE they decided to engage in that particular form of dance-based matchmaking. It wasn't at random - that would be ineffectual in solving the, ahem, shidduch crisis plaguing the tribe of Binyamin. This was specifically arranged by Beis Din in order to circumvent the existing national neder against voluntarily marrying daughters off to the ...


3

Painting of the Rambam; not earlier than 15th century (i.e. unreliable) see here. Statue of Mahral; by sculptor Ladislav Šaloun according to here (i.e. unreliable). Painting of the Gra possibly authentic as it is relatively contemporary see here. See however here that the popular picture is inauthentic, but that there is an authentic picture of him: For a ...


2

Wikipedia states: The exact date that the original semikhah succession ended is not certain. Many medieval authorities believed that this occurred during the reign of Hillel II, around the year 360 CE.[8] However, Theodosius I forbade the Sanhedrin to assemble and declared ordination illegal. (Roman law prescribed capital punishment for any Rabbi ...


-3

An argument can be made that the chain of semicha effectively ended with the destruction of the first (Solomon's) temple and the exile of the Jews into Babylon. Arcahelogical evidence reveal that Jerusalem was largely destroyed, with the entired walled city being burnt to the ground. There is some evidence that other areas of Judah were not deported. ...


4

R' Ephrayim Oshry answered in MiMaamakim (4:10) regarding someone's question if he can join the partisans. It looks like the Teshuva was written around the time that the extermination camps were just beginning and their existence was still just a rumor. Following this rumor, many ran away at night to join the partisans, saying that this is the only way ...


0

I am reminded of this recollection of a visit by Harvey Swados with the Lubavitcher Rebbe: I began ... by asking his opinion of ... of the controversy about the behavior of the German masses and the Jewish leadership, which has tormented the western world ever since, particularly since the appearance of Hannah Arendt's book on the Eichmann trial. ... ...


4

Biur Halacha (156:1) connects it to Torah study in particular, although not for large-scale kollel. Chazon Ish (Kovetz Igros Chazon Ish vol. 1, letter 86) also clearly connects the Rambam to Torah study and even larger scale kollelim. see here at length.


0

As explained on JewishHistory.org (which says its information is based on the work of R. Berel Wein): [Rabbi Meir Shapiro, the originator of the idea] saw daf yomi as a tremendously necessary unifying factor among the Jewish people. He said that if you look at a page of the Talmud, you see the words of the greatest Jewish minds covering the entire ...


1

the Steipler writes in his book "Chayei Olam" that most of kishuf (sorcery) has been forgotten. perhaps due to things like witchhunts, etc. There are however still pockets here and there (in Haiti, certain places in New Orleans) I have personally met people who had contact with sorcery. They related to me experiences they had with sorcerers such as ...


4

from: http://www.chabad.org/library/article_cdo/aid/484213/jewish/What-is-the-Origin-of-the-Bar-Mitzvah-Celebration.htm#footnote1a484213 According to some, the first documented Bar Mitzvah celebration is referred to in the Torah: "And the child [Isaac] grew and was weaned, and Abraham made a great feast on the day that Isaac was weaned" (Genesis ...


2

Ramban (Chapter 9, Verse 12) argues that the rainbow existed before the Mabul. However, only after the Mabul did Hashem select it to serve as a sign of His covenant to not cause another Mabul. The rainbow is a reversed bow. One who wishes to indicate peaceful intentions reverses his weapon away from the person he is greeting and points the weapon towards ...


7

Rav Hirsch writes on Noach 9:12 It is by no means necessary to assume that hitherto there had been no rainbow and to place it in connection with the atmospheric changes which occurred after the Flood. Just as Hashem showed Avraham the starry heavens and said, כה יהיה זרעך, as He showed Moshe and Aharon the new moon, and with the words החדש הזה ...


4

The Gemara derives via drasha an obligation to read zachor. Accordingly they must have said it even before Purim. They specifically started saying it before Purim sometime before the time of the Mishnah, for the mishna in Megillah (29a) says that we say it specifically before purim. The reason for this is to combine the themes of destruction of Amalek ...


1

I assumed it is based on the word הלך, going. Much as we would say inn English, 'I'm going with him' as a term of agreement. I checked Jastrow and he seems to take this route as well. First writing הלך as the שורש, than comparing it to מנהג and translating it accordingly. Practice, adopted opinion, rule. He does the same for הלכתא. He even quotes a Targum ...


0

It is a common talmudic expression (see e.g. Brachos 6b).


1

Based on http://he.wikipedia.org/wiki/%D7%92%27_%D7%91%D7%98%D7%91%D7%AA חגים ומועדים - Holidays נר שמיני של חנוכה, "זאת חנוכה", בשנים בהן חודש כסלו חסר - "Zos Chanuka" or the eighth day of Hanukka (see also: זאת חנוכה) in some years (or the day after in others) אירועים היסטוריים - Historical events ה'תרצ"ג – החל איכלוסה של קריית חיים, הראשונה בין ...


3

It all started way back in the days of the Maharik. See Shoresh 88 which is pointed to and loosely quoted in the Ramma Yoreh Deah 178 siff two. This same responsa is brought in hilchos Tzitzis siman 10, as well. Apparently professionals of any certain field began wearing a special long coat called a Kappah (sounds similar to kappata, no?) and the Rabbis ...


1

There is a piece in the Tshuvas HaRashba in siman 418 which denigrates the belief in gilgulim. It is a response from the Chachmei Luniel to the Rashba, proving that they don't believe in any nonjewish ideas. See there ד.ה. ומתועלותיה בסוד הנפש. One of the points they raise why it is an unjewish belief is because judgement and punishment is a fundamental ...


6

To add to the other (correct) answers, it is indeed a Yiddish word (פּראָבע), and Weinreich's dictionary translates it as "test, tryout; assay; hallmark; probation; rehearsal". In addition, it has אױף פּראָבע (af probe) meaning "as a test; on trial", which neatly fits into the OP's context. Beinfeld and Bochner's dictionary adds the phrase מאַכן פּראָבע ...


6

it is from the common European word for 'examine, test, prove, try', originally from the Latin word probare (infinitive - 'to try, etc.') and late latin proba (noun for proof, whence our English word 'proof'). It gives us the English word probe, probation (trial, proof, demonstration). It has taken on the meaning 'audition' because the chazan/rabbi is trying ...


7

פּראָבעה is apparently a Yiddish word meaning "test" or "tryout". See Google Translate. I don't actually speak Yiddish, but the etymology is probably from German Probe (approximately pronounced probuh, per Wiktionary), with the same meaning. It is related to the English probe, with both deriving from Latin probare. I can't answer for historical usage.


6

Shadchanim often suggested the match, in addition to working out the financial settlements. I reference Gluckel of Hamleyn, a memoir written in the late 1600s/early 1700s. The writer was a wealthy and prominent Jewish woman who lived in Germany in those times. She had many children and was very involved in marrying them off with the appropriate financial ...


2

This video references what may be the source of this misconception: הקדמת רמב"ן לספר בראשית שהיתה הכתיבה רצופה בלי הפסק תיבות, והיה אפשר בקריאתה שתקרא על דרך השמות, ותקרא על דרך קריאתנו בענין התורה והמצוה, ונתנה למשה רבינו על דרך קריאת המצות, ונמסר לו על פה קריאתה בשמות My translation attempt: The writing was continous without spaces, so it was ...


1

I will have to dig up the exact video; but, HaRav Zamir Kohen of Hidabroot touched on this exact question. He said that, in fact, the Torah was given to Moshe without spaces. And that, when HaShem wanted to reveal a certain part of the Torah to Moshe and Bene'i Yisra'el, He would tell Moshe where to place spaces in order for the strings of letters to forms ...



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