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The Maharal in Gevuros Hashem ch. 52 explains this line in two ways. In his first explanation, he writes that the point is not that Hashem would have / could have only taken us out then, but rather that no one else could have taken us out, whether then or at some later point. This is because the Exodus was the creation of the Jewish nation from potential ...


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An interesting point that I have heard actually considers what happened in the United States after the civil war. American Blacks became "free", but examine what happened in the next hundred years. After the slaves became free we had the rise of Jim Crow laws, segregation, the attempt to live in the world of racial prejudice, the start of the modern Civil ...


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1) Perhaps it means the culturally we would still be enslaved to Pharaoh. We would be entrenched in the Egyptian values, their ethical and philosophical beliefs. We would be assimilated into the Egyptian society never to break away if not for God taking us out and providing us with a new outlook on life. 2) Perhaps it is not telling us a historical ...


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Much more than just historical speculation is contained in the Talmud and tradition. The Rabbis talk about science, medicine, astrology, various things we'd now consider superstition, and many many odd stories. Why were speculations like this allowed into the authoritative tradition? Well, for starters, this was just "tradition" before it became ...


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However Vayikra Rabba 19:6 states that the curse was revoked and Zerubavel was part of the line of King David. I go into detail on this answer at which kings must Moshiach descend from?. Among other sources (besides Vayikra Raba) I point to the Abarbanel and Metzudas Dovid in Chagai and Zecharya as well as several possible lists of descendants into ...


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This text was written when the Temple stood and people were eating sacrifices. In fact, all sacrificial bread (other than a few from the Thanksgiving offering) were non-leavened, year-round. Furthermore, on any other run-of-the-mill night of the year you'd see Jews in Jerusalem eating a Thanksgiving sacrifice, and along with it some leavened bread, and some ...


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The sefer Binyan Ariel here writes: According to what would appear to be the simple understanding of this stanza - that on all other nights we can eat either chametz or matzah, whichever our heart desires - it should have written “we eat either chametz or matzah”, like it wrote in the last stanza “we eat either sitting or ...


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The Haggadah does not say that we would still all be slaves today, nor does it say that we would be slaves. It says: “And if the Holy One, Blessed be He, had not taken our forefathers out of Egypt, behold, we (see below) and our children and our children’s children (three generations only) would have been subjugated (but not slaves) to Pharaoh in ...


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Of the old Hashkafah.com regulars who have moved to another forum in the past few years, it seems to me that the majority have moved to iShtetl. A post by H.com user "ijs" confirmed my hunch that many users had left within the last few years. A post by H.com user "33948" inspired me to investigate the hypothesis that most moved to iShtetl. My investigation ...


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The Encyclopaedia Judaica, cited in the Wikipedia article linked in the comments above, states as follows: Eḥad Mi Yode'a is first found in Haggadot of the 16th century and only in those of the Ashkenazi ritual. Many scholars believed that it originated in Germany in the 15th century. Perles showed its similarity to a popular German pastoral song, "Guter ...


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The following is taken from the encyclopedia אוצר ישראל Vol. 5 by R. Eisenstein: In the beginning "Jews" were known as עברים - Hebrews, named for אברם העברי - “Avram the Hebrew” (Bereishis 14:13) who came מעבר (from the other side) of the River Euphrates. And so too Yosef was referred to as “a Hebrew youth” (Bereishis 41:12), and Jonah the Prophet said ...


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Consider the orthographic changes between the pre and post Babylonian captivity (that you can see from the Dead Sea Scrolls). And consider the textual differences between the Dead Sea Scrolls and the Masoretic texts. Though these textual changes exist, it remains an exercise for the student to ascertain whether they are significant.


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To expand on Danny's answer. As per Danny, it's clear that Jews everywhere have had essentially identical texts for thousands of years. If you want to look back before that, I recommend David Weiss Halivni's books, particularly "Peshat & Derash". He defends the thesis that the texts did suffer some issues in the era of the Judges, and that Jewish ...


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As you yourself say, the Muslim claims have never been backed up with proof. If there would be proof, why would they not inform us? That seems ample proof that it's a baseless claim. There are various proofs that the Torah we have is essentially identical to the original (with some minor spelling variants). One is the fact that all Jews have the same ...



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