Hot answers tagged

9

It is logical to think that the priests were careful, so that the blood only landed on the floor, and not on the actual curtains. Regarding Beit HaMikdash, the whole place was covered with aqueducts and water channels from the surrounding rivers/lakes. These would lead the blood (and other remains) outside. For example, the Mishna in Yoma 5, 6 talks about ...


7

To supplement, not supplant, Cauthon's good answer, I'll note that the mishna (Midos chapter 3) says that the altar and its ramp would be cleaned every Friday with a cloth, because of the blood. (This is Rabi's statement, but the commentaries note that he's explaining and not arguing on the other rabbi in the mishna.) (It's not completely clear to me ...


5

The general scholarly answer is, "We don't really know." On linguistic grounds (i.e. an analysis of its language of Late Literary Jewish Aramaic) it is usually considered a "late" targum, i.e. having been composed between the fourth and sixth centuries CE, and some even push it as late as the seventh to ninth centuries CE. We certainly know nothing of the ...


4

In addition to the other answers, we have some evidence that blood did land on the veil in the Holy of Holies when the Kohein Gadol (High Priest) sprinkled it there on Yom Kippur, and that they weren't too good about cleaning it. The gemara in Meilah 17b quotes the sage R' Elazar Bar R' Yose as having seen the curtain in the treasury in Rome, and it had ...


3

Dvarim 7:7 and Dvarim 4:27 would be my guess. The LORD did not set His love upon you, nor choose you, because ye were more in number than any people—for ye were the fewest of all peoples And the LORD shall scatter you among the peoples, and ye shall be left few in number among the nations, whither the LORD shall lead you away.


2

There are differences between texts of Tanach now and in the past. In fact, there are several different so-called "textual witnesses" of Tanach that exist, each of which has their own strengths and weaknesses. The textus receptus — received text of the Jews is the Masoretic text, whose ancestors are present in some form in some of the Dead Sea Scrolls and ...


2

According to this (It's a Google book, on p. 154 - in case link has a problem,) the first use of the Torah pointer in Europe was in Northern Italy dating back to the 15th century.


2

The earliest reference to its use is in connection with the schools of Bethar before the destruction of that place in the war of Bar Kokba (132-135). http://jewishencyclopedia.com/articles/15047-yad


2

3 Enoch is known in Jewish tradition under the name Sefer Hekhaloth. It is part of a wider body of texts known as Hekhaloth literature. This book is now considered one of the primary texts of kabbalah though it is technically, like Sefer Yesirah, pre-kabbalah and subject to interpretations that don't necessitate a kabbalistic metaphysic. At the time it was ...


1

A lot of the late Second Temple schisms are still the subjects of hot debate. As I understand it, the only primary source we have on the Essenes is Josephus; leading some historians to question their existence. (Yes, Ethics of the Fathers does talk about the foolishness of a "what's mine is yours and yours is mine" philosophy, which Lord Sacks reads as a ...


1

Maybe this would be better as a comment, but I'm not able to comment. The first thing I noticed when I saw a picture of the original seal (example) is the left wing covering a bit of the sun, which avoids (page 112) the prohibition to draw celestial bodies. If it was done intentionally, this would be strong evidence that, whatever his reasons for using the ...


1

Rabbi Lawrence Kelemen, an acclaimed lecturer and teacher, has a class proving the veracity of the Oral Torah tradition, as well as dealing with a number of the main questions on the transmission of the Torah as we have it today. The class is freely available here. Additionally, Rabbi Yaakov Weinberg has a wonderful class addressing similar issues, freely ...


1

זה כתוב במזמור שנים עשר :אִמְרוֹת יְהוָה, אֲמָרוֹת טְהֹרוֹת כֶּסֶף צָרוּף, בַּעֲלִיל לָאָרֶץ; מְזֻקָּק, שִׁבְעָתָיִם. אַתָּה-יְהוָה תִּשְׁמְרֵם; תִּצְּרֶנּוּ, מִן-הַדּוֹר זוּ לְעוֹלָם. זה כתוב בספר משלי כָּל-אִמְרַת אֱלוֹהַּ צְרוּפָה זה כתוב בספר ישעיהו יָבֵשׁ חָצִיר, נָבֵל צִיץ; וּדְבַר-אֱלֹהֵינוּ, יָקוּם לְעוֹלָם. זה כתוב בספר ירמיהו ...


1

In the hakdama to Be'er HaGolah, the Maharal explains that the most intense kedusha (holiness) is always expressed in the smallest, or most condensed, manifestation in this world. Thus, the smaller the area of the mikdash (temple), the greater its level of kedusha. So too the Jewish people, as the holy nation, have the smallest manifestation in this world.


1

According to my Lithuanian grandparents, Chelm was a joke name used to make fun of Kelm. The city of Chelm is located in Poland, while the city of Kelm (Kelmé) is located in Lithuania. I don't recall if a reason was given for the switching of names, whether it has to do with mocking Polish in general or whether it was simply a matter of mispronouncing the ...



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