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11

Yes, the Sadducees did believe they were Jewish. However, the confounding factor in the quotes you provide is probably this: That in many gemaras, because of medieval censors, "Christian" or rather "Min" (Christian sectarian) was replaced with "Sadducee". See for example the London manuscript of Yoma 56b that you cited above. I have drawn a red arrow to ...


8

During the Second Temple Period, there were different sects with different interpretations of Judaism. The descendants of the Pharisees wrote the Talmud, which defined Orthodox Judaism as we know today. (What follows is from Rabbi Shneur Leiman's lecture on yutorah.org) The Dead Sea Scrolls belonged to a sect that was clearly not the Pharisees; it includes ...


7

Maimonides says no, though it is preferable that the mohel be a Jewish adult male. A Gentile should not preform the circumcision, but if he does, it need not be repeated (I assume by way of drawing blood). Shulkhan Arukh agrees. So for Sephardic Jews, there is no problem as long as the mohel is Jewish, and it is preferred that he not be a Gentile. However ...


6

If you read the original responsum of the committee (here), you will find that they choose to rule that all prohibitions other than homosexual male anal intercourse (such as the prohibitions of yihud and negiah) are all rabbinic and are superseded by the concept of kvod habriot. (How they deal with the issue of השחתת זרע לבטלה is less clear, which is likely ...


6

The perspective of Orthodox Jews vis-a-vis the Dead sea scrolls varies from non recognition, ambivalence, to outright excitement. For those who do not view it as a life altering find see them as 1. Either a validation of what was already known to them ie. Small variance in textual differences due to a very solid mesorah. 2. the other non canonical scrolls ...


6

I have just compared the weekday ma'ariv services in the following two books: Siddur Sim Shalom for Weekdays, September 2003 (2nd printing) Expanded Artscroll Siddur, Wasserman Edition, 2010 I found the following differences: Sim Shalom has two versions of the beginning of the t'filah, the usual text (page 142a) and the same text with the imahot ...


6

Yehuda Wiesen wrote a "Guide to Practical Halacha and Home Ritual for Conservative Jews" (available here), from which I quote (from the section concerning Shabbat): There are many and various so called minor restrictions, some of which the Conservative movement seems to follow and others that it does not. For example, Orthodox typically avoid use of ...


4

depends whether you truly investigated the truth on this topic or whether you were just interested in writing papers. if the latter, tremendous burning regret. if the former, God will help you find it. And if He doesn't for whatever reason, though this is unlikely, then it's not your fault. Here are some relevant quotes on this from a major Jewish ...


4

A non-Jew who keeps the seven Noahide laws because they were commanded by Moses has a share in the world to come. As a non-Jew, he is not commanded to keep the other mitzvot. Source: Maimonides, Mishneh Torah, Laws of Kings (Hilkhot Melakhim) 8:11.


3

By turning on the light at his request, you would be causing him to violate the commandment of "lifnei 'iver -- placing a stumbling block before the blind." The Rabbis interpret this to forbid one Jew to cause another to sin. See MT Laws of Murder 12:14 for source.


3

I'd seen the question asked years ago about someone in Israel, after shabbos had ended, doing online transactions (including making an ATM withdrawal) that will affect a US computer while it's still shabbos there. The response was that if everything's automated, it's permissible. (This is related to a debate between the academies of Hillel and Shammai in ...


3

Of course, Chabad (or anyone else really, but they may use different language) would consider someone practicing Avodah Zarah in its most egregious form still Jewish, but Chabad, both the non-Meshichist side and the Meshichist side, reject this completely. See here for some links to source letters. Note that the one from the Beis Din of Crown Heights is ...


3

It wouldn't surprise me. Nefesh HaRav quotes some Orthodox rabbis who were disturbed by the phrase as it implies it's impossible to touch the moon; some wanted to simply change the phrase from "I cannot touch you" to "I am not touching you" (i.e. at this very moment). Rabbi Soloveichik felt that was the understanding of the original phrase: "just as I dance ...


3

The SAT seems somewhat analagous to voting: Voting is a civic duty and how we contribute to governance; taking the SAT is required to get into most colleges. Both elections and the SAT are administered by some other organization; the location used is just a location, not a sponsor. Choices are very limited. For voting you have to either use your assigned ...


2

As to their claim: Avot D'Rebbi Natan explains the origins of the Sadduccees and the Boethusians. Zadok and Boethus were students of Antigonus of Socho. He taught that "one should be like a servant who serves the master withoutexpecting a reward..." Somewhere along the chain of oral transmission1, Antigonus' teaching was misinterpreted to be saying that we ...


2

It appears from the Rambam (הלכות גירושין פרק י :כ-כ"ב) and other places that once a couple behaves as husband & wife, then they need a Get to become divorced - and permitted to marry other people. As a result, their divorce as a real one, and would disqualify her from marrying a Cohen.


2

Rabbi Elyashiv Zatzal in Kovaitz Teshuvos 3:115 says that it is possible that the Gezaira of Chasnus applies also to a Mechalel Shabbos. Even though technically one can marry a non observant Jew, the Gezaira was made to keep us separate. יש מקום לומר, שכאשר גזרו על דבר משום חתנות,גזרו גם על מחלל שבתות. ואף על פי שאין איסור ממש להתחתן איתם, אבל הגזרות ...


2

There is room to discuss the validity of most aspects of a Reform conversion - if the Mikvah was a kosher Mikvah, then that would be fine. If the person had in mind to be responsible and accountable for mitzvos, even if they did not intend to keep them, then it would be a matter of dispute if that is valid, but it is possible. The main problem is the ...


2

If her mother's conversion was valid, then she is Jewish. If her mother's conversion was invalid, then she is not Jewish. That's all there is to it. She can proceed from there however she wants.


1

Partnership minyanim give women aliyot or let them lein, based on the Gemara in megillah (stressing the "women can ..." part, but not the "...but they shouldn't" part.) They wait for ten women's presence because, well because it feels nicer that way. And they let a woman be chazan for any part that you could skip altogether if you were in a rush.


1

A Reform conversion is not considered valid, certainly not by Orthodox Jews, and in most cases not even by Conservative Judaism. (I saw Conservative Judaism, rather than Conservative Jews, since Conservative-affiliated Jews in many cases may have a more Reform view of halacha.) So to be considered Jewish by the general Jewish community, Orthodox conversion ...



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