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17

If Pikuach Nefesh pushes off the restrictions of Shabbos, all the more so it pushes off those of Tefila.


14

A famous halachic rule of thumb: If someone has to ask his rabbi on questions of ordinary halacha (not murder or the like) vs. any matter of life or limb, shame on the person asking (duh, go save a life!), and shame on the rabbi who should have made that abundantly clear long ago. So let's get this straight. If a question comes up about violating ...


13

The Mishna Berurah (OC 96 sk 7) rules that if leaving the book on the floor will disturb your kavana (concentration), then you may pick it up in between the different blessings of shmoneh esrei. The Mishna Berura is not explicit about walking, though it does sound like he would permit it. The Be'er Moshe 3:13:6 explicitly permits walking to pick it up if it ...


12

It is definitely allowed. The custom not to speak between washing and hamotzi is nowhere near as strict as the requirement not to speak between hamotzi and eating the bread. The Gemara in Brachot (40a) that you remember permits you to speak between hamotzi and eating for essential purposes ("take some bread," "bring salt/seasoning," "feed the animals"). ...


11

May I call you user1208? There are 2 questions there: Am I allowed to interrupt in such a circumstance? (Yes) If I do interrupt (legally or illegally), does that require me to wash again? (No) Even when we have strict standards for interrupting between related brachos, like birchos krias shema, we pasken like Rabbi Yehuda in Brachos 2:1- ובפרקים שואל ...


10

Shu"t Shevet haLevi (V:16) divides this into 3 parts: If the singing is done together with the words of tefilla, this is considered part of tefilla and a kiyum of lezamer leshimcha elyon. Other times, music is considered separate from the tefilla. For example, the nigun is separated from the words and is "too long" or it's not for the davener's tefilla ...


8

Igrot Moshe (OC 3:8) discusses reciting English translations during prayers. He says: ול"ד לניגונים בעלמא שאף שנשמע כעין הברה כיון שאין לההברה שום כוונת דבור אינו הפסק.‏ And it is not similar to regular tunes [niggunim] for even though they sound like phonemes, since the phoneme is in no way intended to be speech, it is not an interruption.


8

After the fact: Unless the interruption was halachically mandated (eg: he needs to use the facilities), no time or speech interruption affects the validity of your megilla reading (SA OC 690:5). An interruption between the bracha and the beginning of reading does affect the validity of the bracha-mitzva connection. (MB 692:9, also see footnote 12 in ...


7

Yes, this is true. This refers to after you have said the first "yih'yu l'ratzon" and are now in middle of "elokai n'tzor". Different authorities disagree on how you may interrupt, so here's some sources. This website says: "one may answer Amen for Kadish, Kedusha, Barchu (and all the other things permitted Bein HaPerakim of Shema), and according to ...


6

Point 1: See Mishnah Brurah 104:25 that says it is forbidden to speak unless one is an Oines. Point 12: See Mechabar 104:5 that says if the hefsek took as long as it takes to finish the Tefilla then one must start over, otherwise one starts again from the Bracha that he was in the middle of. For more complicated details look at the Mishnah Brurah there. ...


6

This is discussed in Chakirey Minhagim (Rabbi Eliyahu Yochonan Gurary, vol. 2 pg. 90): Eshel Avraham (OC 219:3) debated this and although he begins by saying that it would seem to be a interruption to say Hagomel between the brochos and kadish, he concludes that where there is no existing custom it is perhaps preferable to say Hagomel first. His explanation ...


6

L'chatchilah one should swallow before one speaks see Mishna Brurah 206:12.


5

There is precedent to interrupt mid-davening for a mitzva or for needs of the community. These announcements were actually made right after Yishtabach. Examples in the Shulchan Aruch and Rema (54:3) include: Community needs Tzedaka allocations Blessing an ill person Demanding a fellow congregant show up in court (I think the idea was to pressure him ...


5

Divrei Chaim blogspot bases his words on Rabbi Wahrman. He says, there is a well known machlokes between Rashi and Tosfos (Brachos 21) regarding what to do if one is in the middle of shmoneh esrei and the tzibur is saying kedusha. Rashi writes that one should remain silent and simply attend to the recitation of the tzibur -- based on the principle of ...


5

Rabbi Shmuel Kamenetsky in his Sefer brings as the source for a Shabbos morning Drasha prior to Musaf Brachos 28b first Rashi.


5

To build upon JXG's answer, the Halachah is clearly that you are not allowed to speak unnecessarily in between Berachoth and that for which the Berachah was recited. On the other hand, one may speak in between two separate actions that each have their Berachoth, even if one action is related to the other and speaking is to be limited. Case #1: Like most ...


5

Shulchan Aruch, Orach Chayim 104:5–6 reads: If he paused [even silently —MB] [amid of sh'mone esre enough time] to finish the entire [sh'mone esre], he goes back to the start [of sh'mone esre]; otherwise, he goes back to the start of the b'racha he paused in. But if he stopped in [one of] the first three [b'rachos], he goes back to the start; [in one of] ...


5

I have asked a Chabad rabbi this question and he said one could speak from the first bite, however, since one shouldn't speak with food in his mouth he should wait until swallowing.


5

The Shulchan Aruch (103:2) states: בקש לצאת ממנו רוח מלמטה ונצטער הרבה ואינו יכול להעמיד עצמו הולך אחוריו ארבע אמות ומוציא הרוח וממתין עד שיכלה הריח...וחוזר למקומו וחוזר למקום שפסק If a person has to pass gas and he is unable to hold it in, he should walk backward four amot, release the gas and wait until the smell subsides...and he should then ...


4

As the Baal HaTanya writes (166:1): "But if one is sitting and not doing any action that would distract him from hamotzei, even though he is waiting for a long time, and even if he converses a little, there is no concern since the table is set in front of him and his intention is to eat; that he can converse is on the condition that he doesn't get into a ...


4

Although the Taz (S.A. O.C 55:3) only requires a minyan at the time of kadish, the Magen Avraham (69:4, 234:1) and others say that there needs to be a minyan at the time of pesukim/learning for the kadish to go on. I assume that the shuls don't want to leave the Torahs out and don't want to change the order of davening (and say ashrei after the Torahs are ...


4

The Biur Halacha says you must make a new beracha because since you make the tefilin invalid in the process of checking the parshiyos this is considered a hefsek (interruption) in the mitzvah.


4

From Torah.org Rambam series The concept of "Osek BMitzvah" has three general rules. (According to the Rambam) If you are engaged in a mitzvah (meaning your mind and actions are completely engrossed in it) Then you are exempt from doing any other mitzvot. This means that wearing tzizit does not patur you from other mitzvot because wearing them does not ...


4

Yalkut Yosef vol.1 Hilchot Tefila pg. 176 he says that one should answer "Kadosh" and "Baruch" in the middle of Elokai Nesor as well as the first 5 Amenim of Kadish (the Ben Ish Hai holds that one may even answer Amen DeBerachot. However, Hacham Ovadia I believe writes in Yabia Omer 6:48:4 that one may not do so). However, if one didn't say the first "Yehi ...


4

Siach Tefila question 137 & 138 indicates as follows. If one is in the midst of the actual Tachanun (the part where you place your head on your arm) then he should finish the Tachanun, however if one is in any other part then he should stop and say Vayehi Bin'soa.


4

Mishna Berura 54:3:6 says that one may do any Dvar Mitzva between Yishtabach and Yotzer, however no talking is allowed.


4

HALACHIPEDIA has part of its entry on Birkat HaMazon that deals with the question. The numbers refer to the references – please see the original especially ref 21. It's not the distraction that matters so much as the time and how hungry you are - see below. How long does one have to say Birkat HaMazon? If one ate bread and is full, preferably ...


3

Yalkut Yosef vol. 3 sim. 166 says MeIkar HaDin it is permissible to speak between Netilat Yadayim and Hamosi. Therefor it is permitted to ask for salt.


3

Both Tallit (of any variety) and Tefilin have the same operative principle: the one bracha you say covers all instances of wearing, as long as when you take it off you have in mind to put it back on, and you're never in a position where you couldn't be wearing it. For tefilin, if I have in mind to wear my tefilin for ten minutes, then remove them for ten ...



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