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1

There are several main problems with vegetarian/vegan products. 1) The reliability of the vegan/halal certifying agency is questionable from a Halachik perspective. 2) Jewish law is extremely strict on the prohibition of eating bugs, which are common in vegetable products. (Though this is less of a problem in a paste or puree where the bug cannot possibly ...


4

It would depend both on what's in it and how it was processed. There are many ingredients that are Halal and/or vegetarian and are not kosher (e.g. non-kosher wine [which might also be vegan]; some produce from Israel; turtle eggs). Also cooking utensils/processing equipment would have to be kosher. That said, there are some products that don't require ...


5

It would seem to be that this establishment is not to be patronized and or trusted to be serving kosher food unless they have a kosher certification. This is based on a rule enacted by the Vaad Ha'arba Artzot - The Council of the Four Lands, the central body of Jewish authority in Poland from 1580 to 1764. The Vaad instituted that it is forbidden to eat any ...


4

I don't really know what the situation in other countries in, but for a very long time, the only meat sold in stores in America has been soaked and salted. Even if a kosher-labelled piece of meat has not been salted properly, it's בטל ברוב, as the overwhelming majority of meat is completely kosher. ...you used the word "treyf," by which you probably meant ...


5

The Atlanta Kashrus Agency does not recommend the KORC. The AKC does not recommend the KORC certification. Lettuce products with this certification have been found to have have insects and require additional washing and checking.


6

Considering the opacity around the acceptability of different kashruth certification organizations in America, I don't think many people will be able to accurately answer this question. That being said, KORC appears on neither the cRc nor KosherQuest (Rabbi Eidlitz, based in California) lists of reliable hashgachot (although they of course have disclaimers ...


5

This info is on Kashrut.com : Orthodox Rabbinical Council of San Francisco 1851 Noriega Street, P.O. Box 22491, San Francisco, CA 94122 415-564-5665, Fax: 415-665-0394 Rabbi Jacob Traub, Chairman Email: orcsf@aol.com I could not find any info on any kashrut site regarding its reliability. As a matter of fact, various web forums debate its kashrut, with ...


6

Baking hand shmura matzahs involves placing the matzahs in an oven using long wooden poles. Out of concern that some dough may be stuck on to the pole the poles are sanded down after use. Some avoid the whole issue of stuck dough and cover the poles with paper using masking tape as the adhesive - a common practice in matzah chaburos. Since the matzah comes ...



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