Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

19

I had an email correspondence with Rabbi Saffra several years ago about the cheese question. His response was very clearly that he did not hold cheese produced with microbial media to be cheese in the traditional understanding, since microbial coagulant did not exist at the time of the Shulchan Aruch. He said it is a different product, so the gezerah was not ...


15

As one who has a brother in the bakery business who has 4 certifications on his products I dispute this claim. My brother has 4 different certifications in order to appeal to different communities. There are those that only eat specific certifications and will not eat your product unless it is certified by a Rabbi that they feel comfortable with. (Correct: ...


13

I found a couple of statements about this on ou.org: "To avoid confusion, the OU has chosen not to use the D.E. categorization. We feel that many people will not be familiar with the ramifications of this halachic status." (from a 1992 article, here) "The OU doesn’t recognize a DE or “Dairy Equipment” designation, and so all products made on dairy ...


12

Rabbi Sholem Fishbane has a comprehensive article about Slurpees here: http://www.crcweb.org/kosher_articles/slurpees.php Regarding the nozzles of the machines, an article by Rabbi Dovid Cohen (http://www.crcweb.org/kosher_articles/fountain_soda.php) describes how the CRC came to the conclusion that it does not pose a kashrus concern.


12

From the O-U website: It is assumed that instant coffee does not require a hechsher, since coffee plants process just that and nothing else. Although there are forms of flavored instant coffees, the flavors are added at ambient temperatures after the drying process. Nevertheless, it is good and prudent practice to purchase instant coffee with a ...


11

Every Kosher Agency has its own standards that it adheres to. It has its leniencies that it follows, as well as stringencies. If you don't agree with those leniences, then you won't trust that hechsher. There are many things that must be taken into account. Some examples: the Kashering process between non-kosher and kosher products run on the same line. ...


10

I think the issue is not so much ease of verification as much as it is ease of forgery. It's a lot easier for a restaurant to lie and state on a sign that it is Kosher than it is for them to forge a certificate from a certifying agency and also have someone at the phone ready to lie and give false answers should someone call the number printed on the ...


10

In the words of the esteemed sage Jerry Garcia: Constantly choosing the lesser of two evils is still choosing evil. I'd advise the individual to get out of the situation as best as he can. There's a similar legend has it regarding Ridbaz, who was a rabbi in Chicago in the early 1900s. He found himself "accidentally" locked into a freezer when ...


10

About ten years ago, I learned the following, specifically about Dunkin Donuts (DD), from Rabbi Gershon Segal, a local rabbi who does local supervision, including of local DD branches, on behalf of local and national kashrut agencies. This is from my memory of what he said verbally back then, so contemporary reality in various locations may vary. However, I ...


10

Based on Footnote 3 of Halachically Speaking Volume 5 Issue 12 (which seems to also be the source of the text in the question): If Mister Jones has two restaurants, one kosher one not-kosher, and I certify the kosher one, I occasionally go into the non-kosher restaurant to make sure that nothing there claims to be certified by me. I never would have ...


10

These eggs are cooked by boilers that run constantly. The OU ensures that when the boiler needs to be restarted, it is done with a Mashgiach. Source: I heard it from a Rabbi who asked the OU and got that answer. Of course we may not be talking about the same company, but the point being that the OU requires the Bishul Yisroel and makes arrangements for it. ...


9

"and you may correct me if I'm wrong" You are wrong. No agency is universally accepted. Period. (If you meant to ask for agencies that are widely accepted, just "not by all", then that is an entirely different question, and depends on many factors, most practically geography, as some of the other answers indicate)


8

This can be a loaded question, but here goes: Different kosher organizations can have different standards; the same organization can have two levels of standards, of which one might be "regular kosher" and another "mehadrin" (super-duper) kosher. E.g. in the page you linked, there are Rabbanut non-mehadrin, and Rabbanut mehadrin. Often politics can play ...


8

"Reliable" is a loaded word. Let's try "accepted among conventional American Orthodox standards as we know them." A good first place to try is Rabbi Eidlitz's kosherquest list: http://www.kosherquest.org/symbols.php It's not necessarily comprehensive, and occasionally people may nitpick with it, but it's a good first-order approximation. In Israel, ...


8

The Kof-K gives the hechsher on Pepsi. I have spoken to them and they said the following: the syrup used is all under the certification of the Kof-K. Certain bottling plants have a mashgiach on premises and products which come out from that facility have a kosher symbol on them. Other plants don't have a mashgiach on premises and the products that come ...


8

As of 2010, Australian Vegemite is now Kosher. However, bottles must be inspected before purchase for the "K" symbol above the barcode since Kosher Vegemite prior to 2010 was only produced in batches http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vegemite#Kosher_and_Halal ...


8

According to the CRC: Black, green, white, yellow, oolong, and jasmine tea are all inherently kosher for Pesach, but the issues of decaffeination and flavoring apply to tea in the same way that they apply to coffee. For that reason all decaffeinated tea and all flavored tea (which includes most herbal teas) should only be used on Pesach if they bear an ...


7

The Gemara (Bab. Shabbath 21a) tells us that this practice, on some level, dates way back at least to the time of the Ḥashmonaim. the Kohanim would light the Menorah in the Beith HaMikdash using oil in sealed containers bearing an official seal that, unless tampered with, marked that the oil was pure and usable for the Menorah.


7

Even if the horn comes from a kosher animal, the shofar could still be rendered non-kosher if non-kosher materials are added during the shaping and polishing process. According to this article (http://www.jdoorpost.com/2010/06/non-kosher-shofars-imported/), there were problems last year with shofars from China and Morocco.


7

The OU (Webbe Rebbe) told me in an email that: "If the ingredients list dairy items it is dairy otherwise you can assume that the product is 'only' made on equipment." So although they stopped with the OU-DE, it seems that they assume that consumers can read ingredients and figure things out for themselves.


7

Factory products are produced by big companies and are produced in bulk, which are scared to put a trademarked symbol on their product when everyone could see it, because they will be the subject of a huge lawsuit. Small restaurants may be more willing to take the risk, and may hope that nobody notices their infringement.


7

I hope this goes some way in answering your question: When I used to live in New York, I had never before seen such a huge proliferation of Kashrut organisations. I asked different Rabbonim, who all "held by" different hashgachot. Ultimately, I decided to personally check out the few places with hechsherim I had not been advised about. I went into a Crumbs ...


7

Well, by US law, any manufacturer can put a plain K on its product. That just means "someone says it's kosher." If they put a plain K on a package of bacon, you'd have to sue them for false advertising, unless they could find someone who says bacon is kosher. As for Jewish law, as new situations come up, rabbis who are regarded as experts on Jewish law ...


7

I found the site I was thinking of, anyone know of any others? http://www.hechshers.info/shapes/index.htm


7

There are certain foods likely to be taken from live animals and most others would not be. So for example, I'd trust that most chicken or beef available on the market is not eiver min hachai. But snow crab legs are apparently often taken from live snow crabs. So if the ben noach knows what foods are likely to be problematic, they can avoid those or devote ...


7

One could dream up some remote possibilities, but in short, it's not: The OU feels that Ziploc bags need approval It's: The Ziploc company decided they'd sell better with OU approval There's an OU shiur (I believe it was a session for women in professional kashrus, and it featured Rabbi Yoel Schoenfeld) where someone asked about an OU on bottled ...


7

Hallachicly there is nothing that makes an issue out of eating the food when the item has multiple certifications, whatever the motivation or propriety of doing so (and I think Gershon Gold is spot on about the manufacturer's motivation in having them). That being said, in terms of the application of the general hashkafic point, almost any meat you are ...


7

Apparently, some Dannon yogurts (with K) and Yoplait yogurts (with KD) are under the supervision of Rabbi David Sheinkopf and Rabbi Barnett Hasden, respectively. (Regarding Rabbi Hasden's hashgacha, see this related question). I'm not certain whether either of those rabbis provide supervision with kashrus standards that are widely considered acceptable. ...


7

Per CRC-Chicago All dental floss, including flavored, may be used. However, during pesach one should only use the unflavored variety.


6

I thought it was Rabbi Zevulun Charlop who gives the certification. Regardless, yes Pepsi is certified, but no the symbol is not on the label. Most of the major American brands are certified, but often the mark is not on the label. Here's a list, courtesy of kashrut.com and the cRc. If a soda is totally uncertified, it's generally not recommended. Too ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible