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Like yEz's answer, this answer is not sourced; it is simply a suggestion. מוצאי שבת refers to Saturday night. In my experience, there is a certain feeling on Saturday night that is different from the rest of the week. It's not Shabbat anymore, but there is a bit of the feeling of Shabbat left over. You're probably still wearing your Shabbat clothes and you ...


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Not sure if this is what you're looking for, but... The Maharal in an exposition of Eruv Tavshilin describes the status of the 3 different tiers of days as paralleling the 3 different stages of human history. Chol, the regular work-week days, parallel olam hazeh, this world where we toil toward an ultimate reward. Shabbath, the day of rest, parallels olam ...


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In the comments, you cite this link. I believe you were confused due to English not being your first language by this sentence: "used as a proper name of God only." In context, that sentence does not mean that the word אֲדֹנָי can only refer to God. It means that the word אֲדֹנָי refers to God when it is used as a proper name. Indeed, as Yishai pointed out ...


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They were both tall people (giants), but they are a different group of people and they lived in different areas. One of the key verses is Deuteronomy 2:10-11 (texts from Sefaria): הָאֵמִ֥ים לְפָנִ֖ים יָ֣שְׁבוּ בָ֑הּ עַ֣ם גָּד֥וֹל וְרַ֛ב וָרָ֖ם כָּעֲנָקִֽים׃ רְפָאִ֛ים יֵחָשְׁב֥וּ אַף־הֵ֖ם כָּעֲנָקִ֑ים וְהַמֹּ֣אָבִ֔ים יִקְרְא֥וּ לָהֶ֖ם אֵמִֽים׃ ...


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Rashi points out that these were different groups of of "giants". The Art Scroll commentary on Devarim 10-11 refers to Rashi and explained that the nation of Eimim were colloquially considered like Refaim "which was a different family of giants (Anakim)". However, they were not the Refaim whose territory Bnai Yisrael were going to conquer. The Eimim had been ...


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The addition of a nun is referred to in some grammars as "nunation"; this particular type of nun is the "paragogic nun", and its usage is controversial. It appears over 300 times throughout Tanakh (mostly in Deuteronomy, incidentally - 56 times), primarily on the ends of 3rd person and 2nd person plurals, but sometimes also on the end of a 2nd person ...


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You can use a biblical hebrew dictionary, BDB(Brown Driver Briggs) is a classic. You can use a concordance. Strongs concordance(a concordance lists all occurrences of a word - and strongs has english translation). They are written by Christians, but not missionaries. Academically rigorous scholars. Modern Orthodox Jews if they are scholarly and very into ...



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