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The Or Hachayim on Vayikra 19:3 quoted by @Fred provides a kabbalistic explanation: ואת שבתותי תשמרו... ואמרו בזוהר חדש (ריש פ' תולדות) כי יום שבת הוא כנגד יוסף הצדיק, והוא סוד השלום ולזה אנו אומרים שבת שלום ואנו מברכין הפורס סכת שלום Translation: "And guard My Sabbaths" (Vayikra 19:3)... And it says in the Zohar Chadash (beginning of Toldot) that ...


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The year is a gematria: תשעה ת = 400 ש = 300 ע = 70 ה = 5 which adds to 775. The 'ה prefix presumably is indicating the thousands although this is usually omitted when quoting a year. However 4775 would of course also be תשעה There are no letters that correspond to numbers above 400 so we actually combine two and add them together. I have seen some ...


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תשע"ה is not an abbreviation, rather it is a number. Each Hebrew letter corresponds to a number, this is known as Hebrew Numerals see: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hebrew_numerals In this instance the numbers refer to the year in the Hebrew calendar 5775 Thus, it says the first of Adar of the year 5775 (ie. 5775 years since creation)


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I believe that many current printings are changing the Rashi script into block script. One reason to use Rashi script is a very technical one: When multiple commentaries are printed on a page, it presents a visual difficulty. By writing half of the commentaries in Rashi script, it is easier for a person to visually track and read each commentary.


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-kha is masculine. -kh is generally (though not always) feminine.


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I'm not certain but it appears to be some kind of blank agreement with the year not written in on the first line. The first line reads something like this, "With great blessing, sealed on the XXth of Shevat,(blank for year)". It is definitely Jewish from the symbolism and script but is too short to be any kind of ketubah. It is possible that this is some ...


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I assumed it is based on the word הלך, going. Much as we would say inn English, 'I'm going with him' as a term of agreement. I checked Jastrow and he seems to take this route as well. First writing הלך as the שורש, than comparing it to מנהג and translating it accordingly. Practice, adopted opinion, rule. He does the same for הלכתא. He even quotes a Targum ...


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It is a common talmudic expression (see e.g. Brachos 6b).



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