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1

I think the term Golus covers what you are looking for. I do not mean the literal translation, but rather the sentimental feeling the word gives, and its application even by those that live in Israel.


2

My great uncle when leading the family Seder always said 'Arbang mi'yodeya' etc (as well as 'ki lau no'eh' and bimhighrow yivneh besau b'kaurov'). Our family background is Anglo-Jewish since about 1740 and before that from yekkish/Dutch forebears) and my grandmother's transliteration of the Shema started 'Shemang'.


4

You ask here how to change a name, related MY questions address the questions of whether it is permitted and to what name change to it. Today to change one's name one goes to a rav (rabbi) although chabad.org says this is only to change the first and main name, otherwise anyone can add a name. It describes the process as follows When changing a ...


3

Josephus transliterates the name as Ἀσαμωναίος. The transliterated form ω corresponds to long o (see Brønno, "Some nominal types in the Septuagint" in Classica et Mediaevalia 3 and Studien über Hebräische Morphologie und Vokalismus auf Grundlage der Mercatischen Fragmente der zweiten Kolumne der Hexapla des Origines). For example, יוֹנָתָן is transliterated ...


0

Berachot 8b: אני צויתי למקודשי תני רב יוסף אלו הפרסיים המקודשין ומזומנין לגיהנם: "I have commanded to my קדש ones (Yishayahu 13:3)--" Rav Yosef taught: These are the Persians, who are separated (קדש) and prepared foor Gehinnom. When taken with its usage in Torah, we find that the root, קדש means 'separated for a special cause."


1

"Making Aliyah" is the phrase used for someone moving to Eretz Yisrael permanently. "Having an Aliyah" is used for someone being called to the Torah. We say on the yahtzeit (anniversary of a person's death" that the neshama (soul) should "have an aliyah" [rise in (spiritual) status]. In fact, someone leaving Eretz Yisrael is said to be making a yeridah ...


1

Well, this has been fun. This was definitely painted by someone who was not fully Hebrew-literate, and not used to writing the letters. He may have been trying to make a Jewish- or Biblical-looking painting without knowing anything. However, it is not correct that these are random letters or that it is all nonsense. It is likely that he got the words from ...


1

פרק ב - משנה ה חִבּוּר. הִתְחִיל לְפָרֵק, אֹכֶל שֶׁהִתְחִיל בּוֹ, אֵינוֹ חִבּוּר. ‎‏ הָאֱגוֹזִים שֶׁאֲמָנָן‏ ‎‏ הָאֱגוֹזִים וְהַשְּׁקֵדִים, חִבּוּר, עַד שֶׁיְּרַסֵּס:‏ ר"ע מברטנורה הַמְחַתֵּךְ לְבַשֵּׁל. ...: הָאֱגוֹזִים שֶׁאֲמָנָן שֶׁגִּדְּלָן וְחִבְּרָן זוֹ בָזוֹ. לְשׁוֹן וַיְהִי אֹמֵן אֶת הֲדַסָּה (אֶסְתֵּר ב): ... ...


1

Maybe that's why he says "שגדלן" (which otherwise seems out of place when talking about stringing things together. I mean, yeah, by doing so you're making something that's bigger, but that's not usually thought of as embiggening the nuts): to show the connection to the word in Esther which means "to embiggen" in another sense, viz to rear. Just my own ...


3

The Comprehensive English-Yiddish Dictionary has Hasid, f. --- די חסידה, ־ות; די חסידתטע, ־ס with pronunciations [KhSÍDE, -S] and [KhSÍDESTE, -S], respectively.


1

Chossidit is an adjective, not a name. But Chassidist is a name. In Hebrew this name is Chassida. In Erets Israel we say Chassida. But Litayt, not Litaa. (mnemonic: Storks eat lizards, so we say litait because of the Chassida).


1

To look or regard. See: A Comprehensive Etymological Dictionary of the Hebrew Language for Readers of English p. 401, 1987 by R. Ernest Klein


1

Perhaps seeng or looking. See here on Radak and R. Yona Ibn G'anach here



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