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8

I asked this question once when I wanted to learn a Masechta for the purpose of making a Siyum. I learned it on mp3 and made a Siyum with the approval of a prominent Rav who ran a Kiruv program for which I volunteered in DC.


7

Most Poskim say that if another option exists, a telephone should not be used to fulfill the mitzvah of Havdalah. Rather a woman who is home alone and has no one to make Havdalah for her, should recite it herself (Mishnah Berurah 296:35 - Aruch HaShulchan 296:5) rather than listen to it over the telephone. Even if the lady can not drink wine, grape juice, or ...


5

It should be no different than any other halachah where you have to hear something. You can't be yotzei by hearing shofar, or megillah, or the like over the phone (will have to find the source for this), because you're not hearing the original sound but a re-creation of it from electrical signals; the same presumably applies to havdalah.


5

A partial answer to the first part only. It seems that ululation is practised by Sephardic women. In this article, it is connected to the Torah reading: “Sephardic women, primarily those from Syria, Iran, and Iraq, make an ululating sound after the Torah honoree (especially a bar mitzvah or bridegroom) has concluded the final blessing or has ...


4

Dan's answer covered the "how are those blasts calculated?" part of your question; I'll do the other part, "Do we actually hear 100 or are there extra?". We actually hear 100: 30 initially, 30 in the silent sh'mone esre (nusach S'farad and nusach Ari), 30 in the repetition of the sh'mone esre, and 40 (nusach Ashk'naz) or 10 (nusach S'farad and nusach Ari) ...


4

Ya'aqov Etzyon, in the article "משבירים ושוברים"( in the section entitled "לשבר את האוזן"), brings Rashi on Shemot 19:18, s.v. ha-Kivshan, which says: הכבשן: של סיד, יכול ככבשן זה ולא יותר, תלמוד לומר (דברים ד יא) בוער באש עד לב השמים. ומה תלמוד לומר כבשן, לשבר את האוזן, מה שהיא יכולה לשמוע, נותן לבריות סימן הניכר להם. כיוצא בו (הושע יא י) כאריה ישאג, ...


3

Hinting to a non jew to help you (without telling them explicitly) could do the trick. Before you find someone to remove the battery place a chair underneath ceiling where the smoke alarm is. Although it could be considered dangerous to have a non-functioning smoke alarm over shabbat, it may be a temporary solution before you can replace the battery. If its ...


3

In the beginning of Shmuel 1, we have the story Chana davening for a son. The posuk states that Chana was davening quietly: וְחַנָּה, הִיא מְדַבֶּרֶת עַל-לִבָּהּ--רַק שְׂפָתֶיהָ נָּעוֹת, וְקוֹלָהּ לֹא יִשָּׁמֵעַ; וַיַּחְשְׁבֶהָ עֵלִי, לְשִׁכֹּרָה (Shmuel 1, 1:13) Eli HaNovi, mistaking her for a drunk, rebuked her. However, she was shown to be "in the ...


3

Based on the Sefer HaBeracha WeHilchoteah (58:15) it counts as Miswat Talmud Torah.


3

The Lubavitcher Rebbe wrote (with regards to Megilla, Shofar, and Gittin) that in contrast to an acoustic hearing aide whose amplified sound is connected to the original sound, a sound produced through a microphone (or telephone) has no halachic connection to the original sound. A microphone (or telephone) works by a voice changing the electric current ...


3

No, but if it is live yes (Yalkut Yosef, Helek 3, 215:4). However, over the internet it would be Asur (Q&A 91813 to R' Musafi). The reason is because the internet is a little off. Forgot to mention: Even if you both are Mechawen you can't be Yose.


2

The Rivevos Ephraim 8:102:2 writes that watching the syium hashas (live)on tv and hears kaddish ,one can answer amen yehei shmei rabbah... Since it is not the shem Hashem,he also talks about hearing thunder over the phone and holds one may say bracha without Shem UMalchus. http://www.hebrewbooks.org/pdfpager.aspx?req=1082&st=&pgnum=73


2

Although if the shiur was live, it could be allowed (you don't need to hear the bracha to answer amein, like in the famous shul in Alexandria where they used to wave flags to tell people to answer Amein)


2

No - even in Shul you only answer Amein if it is done immediately or else it is an Amein Yesoma. Therefore you should not answer Amein if you are listening to a pre recorded Shiur. However if you are listening to a live Shiur then I do not know whether you should answer or not.


2

The mishna in Berakhot 2:3 records the following dispute between Rabbi Yosei and the tana qama: הקורא את שמע ולא השמיע לאזנו - יצא. רבי יוסי אומר: לא יצא My translation: One who reads the Shema' but not so that his ear hears it has fulfilled his obligation. Rabbi Yosei says, he has not fulfilled his obligation. The gemara (Berakhot 15a) ...


2

http://www.inner.org is Rabbi Ginsburgh's official website. There are both text and audio lectures available.


2

A few potential angles to say it is a bad idea: Since mimetic tradition is a strong source in Jewish thought: My mother told me it is bad middot. Rashi on Bamidbar 24:5 says that Balak was praising Jewish homes for not having one door face another. This creates the notion of privacy within one's home being a good thing. Eavesdropping, as a violation of ...


2

See Siman 55 in Biur Halacha: http://www.hebrewbooks.org/pdfpager.aspx?req=14170&st=&pgnum=172&hilite= Summary: Taz isn't too fond of the idea of having a deaf Shaliach Tzibbur. If he is davening, however, according to Magen Avraham, Gra, Bach and others, it appears we should not remove him from the amud. Rabbi Akiva Eiger concludes that ...


1

I suggest you ask Chabad. They may well have a recording, and if not, there may be someone willing to record it.


1

Your concerns are well-founded. While a number of bands are unaware of, or ignore, the clear health-related and halachic ramifications of loud music, it is certainly contrary to Jewish law to have loud music played at simchas (or otherwise). For an in-depth response and much more information on this matter, I would recommend Rabbi Forsythe's article "Dangers ...


1

Someone I know, who knows halacha, suggested to me tentatively that a smoke detector is movable (it is a keli shem'lachto l'heter or, at worst, a keli shem'lachto l'isur, still movable under the circumstances) and that one could remove it from the wall (if it's not screwed in, as many are not) and hide it in a room where it will not be heard. He was ...


1

See Remah 124:11, who says that as long as one knows which blessing is being answered, even if he does not hear the blessing at all he can say Amen. The same thing is for Kaddish, Kedusha, and Baruchu. (I always assumed that the flag system is Alexandria was a complex flag signaling system that not only told the congregation when to answer, but also what ...


1

Rabbi Moshe Heinemann of Baltimore uses this as proof that one does not need to hear the words in order to be yotzei; one merely needs to be present. I heard this from him in a lecture.


1

I think that this site http://www.chabad.org/holidays/JewishNewYear/template_cdo/aid/746659/jewish/Why-do-we-blow-the-shofar-so-many-times.htm sums up the computation -- what is important to remember is that a tri-blast like what we call a shevarim is considered "one unit" in the computation as is the truah which is often 9 staccato bursts -- one unit when ...



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