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I'm a student at YU and we were recently encouraged by our Roshei Yeshiva, including Rabbi Kenneth Brander, to undergo screening when JScreen came to our school. I an my fellow students felt very comfortable with JScreen's approach, credibility, and follow-up. Here is what he wrote: Dear Students, We believe that all students should undergo genetic testing ...


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My Orthodox Rabbi recommended JScreen as they work with a network of reputable Rabbis from around the country. He felt strongly that I should receive the results and that their is no stigmatization regarding shidduchim.


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There are two issues here Are Jews permitted to test for genetic diseases before getting married? Are they required to? Does this apply differently for Ashkenazim and Sefardim? The answer to the first issue is that it is permitted and even recommended by some for Ashkenazim because of the prevalence and terrible consequences of Tay-Sachs. See for ...


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Yoatzot indeed says that Prenatal testing for genetic or birth defects involves a number of halachic issues. With most of the available technology, the main concern is not with the procedures themselves - blood tests and ultrasounds - but with what might be done with the results. When testing is done prior to marriage, there is a concern that ...


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There are different diseases that run in Sephardic families, such as Thalassemia and Glycogen Storage Disease. It stands to reason that if it's advisable for Ashkenazim to get tested against their common diseases, the same would apply for Sephardim respectively. This is also what I've heard from some Jewish educators and medical professionals, though I ...



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