Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

27

Igros Moshe has a tshuva regarding smoking Marijuana. He forbids it for several reasons: It damages the body. Moreover, even if people claim that people are not harmed, their intellect is harmed, which is a worse damage than damaging the body. It prevents one from understanding Torah, Davening, and keeping mitzvos properly. One gives himself extra ...


25

According to R' Dr. David Shabtai, in a 2013 Times of Israel blog post, there is no such source: The religious exemption exists to protect people whose religion forbids vaccination, to allow religious practice without governmental intervention. The basis for this exemption is to protect people whose religion prohibits vaccinations. This is not true ...


22

Short answer: NO. Long answer: also NO. Here's why: Rabbi Yosef Karo writes (Shulchan Aruch, Orach Chaim 328:2): מִי שֶׁיֵּשׁ לוֹ חֹלִי שֶׁל סַכָּנָה, מִצְוָה לְחַלֵּל עָלָיו אֶת הַשַּׁבָּת; וְהַזָּרִיז, הֲרֵי זֶה מְשֻׁבָּח; וְהַשּׁוֹאֵל, הֲרֵי זֶה שׁוֹפֵךְ דָּמִים Someone who has a life-threatening illness is commanded (מצוה) to violate ...


14

Reb Moshe answers NO you may not smoke marijuana Here are the list of his reasons: Firstly like the Ben Sorer Umoreh the rebellious son. A Ben Sorer Umoreh steals meat and wine and scarfs it down. He is addicted to physical pleasures, he will come to do anything to support his habit robbing and killing too. In order to prevent this we kill him before it ...


14

Per Mishna Berura Orach Chaim 567:3:11 if a person is bothered by the lack of brushing their teeth or the smell/taste in their mouth, they are permitted to rinse their mouth on public fasts, however one should tip their head forward in order that it should not reach their throat.


14

Rambam Hilchos De'os 5:3 ג. כשהחכם שותה יין אינו שותה אלא כדי לשרות אכילה שבמעיו וכל המשתכר הרי זה חוטא ומגונה ומפסיד חכמתו ואם נשתכר בפני עמי הארץ הרי זה חילל את השם ואסור לשתות יין בצהרים ואפילו מעט אלא אם היה בכלל האכילה שהשתיה שהיא בכלל האכילה אינה משכרת ואין נזהרין אלא מיין שלאחר המזון.‏ My loose translation: A Chacham only drinks wine ...


13

See the Mishnah Brurah (230: 7): מי שמתעטש וחבירו אומר לו אסותא יאמר לו ברוך תהיה ואחר כך יאמר לישועתך קויתי השם That when one sneezes, and hears his friend say "אסותא" to him, should reply with the phrases ... I wasn't 100% sure what אסותא meant, but I found it described here as "an Aramaic word meaning health". So there you have it: a source ...


11

I don't have sources, but logically: On a purely halachic level, the prohibition is "eating" and your eating is done. It is a m'uvas lo yuchal liskon (Kohelet 1:15). One can argue that as long as the treif is in the system, there remains a kabbalistic issue of timtum halev, that the treif spiritually affects the body. However, this is not clear since the ...


11

Please see "The Segal Guide to Fasting For Yom Kippur (from a Medical Perspective)," written by a physician. The very first point he deals with is the thirst issue you raised. Hope you have a successful and meaningful fast this year!


11

Rav Shlomo Zalman Auerbach ruled that one may violate שבת for the injection of morphine. See שמירת שבת כהלכתה, chapter 32, footnote 150, where Rabbi YY Neuwirth writes that he heard from Rav Shlomo Zalman that since זריקת מורפיום (morphine injection) does not have any healing properties, and it's just for the relief of pain, it should be forbidden; however, ...


11

No. Pigs are singled out by the Torah (Leviticus 11:7) as one of the unkosher animals that have a single kosher sign (they have split hooves but don't chew their cud), and as such, are Biblically prohibited. A Biblical prohibition cannot be overturned (Rambam's Laws of Foundations of the Torah 9:1). (According to some,) the kashrut laws were not instated ...


10

See the discussion here. The Magen Avraham shrugs his shoulders as to why this prohibition became carved-in-stone halacha, but once it did, we accept it as such.


10

Here's a list of things that are fobidden, according to the Kitzur Shulchan Aruch Kitzur Shulchan Aruch 4:2 - Not urinating when one has the urge Kitzur Shulchan Aruch 6:5 - Not pouring out water in homes next to where a person died Kitzur Shulchan Aruch 32:17 - Drinking very cold water when tired Kitzur Shulchan Aruch 33: 1: Eating meat with ...


10

From a personal perspective, I have found that the easiest fasts I have had, came when Yom Kippur was on a Monday, and Sunday morning I did a 3-4 hour run (training for a fall marathon). My theory is that knowing how dumb an idea it is to do a 3-4 hour run, mere hours before a 25 hour fast, I try to compensate by drinking the rest of the day, every 10-20 ...


10

There is an Agadic opinion brought in Or Hachaim in parshas Shmini 11:7 that after the arrival of Moshiach, the pig will begin to chew its cud, and will at that point be Kosher.* Until that day, the Torah clearly gave two signs which we base our dietary laws upon which cannot be ignored. Whether or not Rabbis throughout the ages have tried to make keeping ...


9

Not necessarily. There is a misconception that Kosher food is more healthy than non-kosher. However, poisons can be kosher, while perfectly healthy salads with some dead bugs are not. The laws of Kosher ensure one's spiritual health rather than his physical one.


9

Sefer Hachinuch 73 says (in my own loose translation, and with emphasis added): Among the bases for this command [of not eating an animal that was slaughtered and then found to have been close to death] is as follows. The body is a receptacle for the soul; through the body, the soul does its work. Without the body, the soul's work can never be completed. ...


8

Cell phone use is so widespread and the results of these studies are sketchy at best. Even if there is truth to the "reports", since the use of cell phones is so widespread it falls under the category of Shomer Pisayim Hashem, G-d guards fools. i.e. It is permissible to use cellphones.


8

To sum up what's been said so far: A Cohen, like any other Jew, is obligated to attempt to save a life. I'm not sure whether someone whose brain is alive but heart has stopped temporarily is halachically "alive", "dead", or possibly something in between. Again, this state doesn't naturally last for very long, so usually the discussion was about whether ...


8

Shulchan Aruch, Yoreh De'ah 179:5 (citing Sanhedrin 90a and 101a), states: הלוחש על המכה או על החולה ורוקק ואחר כך קורא פסוק מן התורה אין לו חלק לעוה"ב ואם אינו רוקק איסורא מיהא איכא ואם יש בו סכנת נפשות הכל מותר. תינוק שנפגע אין קורין עליו פסוק ואין מניחין עליו ס"ת. "One who whispers over a wound or over a sick person, expectorates, and ...


8

The Rabbis forbade taking medicine on Shabbos (barring the person being sick), because they were worried one might come to grind medicine on Shabbos (think mortar and pestle), and grinding on Shabbos is a Biblical Prohibition (Tochen). In the time of the Gemara (and perhaps now, although I'm not aware of it) people would take medicine, in order to sweat for ...


8

Shemiras Shabbas K'hilchasa 32:62 -- one is allowed to inject vaccines where there is a concern that the patient will become dangerously sick. If a doctor feels that this is urgent, then even biblical transgressions such as driving a car or writing a script are allowed, where necessary. In footnote 160, there, Rav Neuwirth cites what he wrote earlier, in ...


8

This discussion is basically the entirety of Bava Kama. There's way too much to source directly, but I'll try to point to a couple things. The source for Chovel (recently came up in a Daf Yomi Shiur for Kesuvos 32) is derived from the possuk that ossurs a shaliach beis din from adding to the malkus. Chazal point out that Beis Din is given the authority to ...


7

The Rambam (Hil. De'os 4:2,14) recommends exercising (and then resting briefly) before eating.


7

What things are dangerous? A.) Anything currently recognized by today's conventional medicine as dangerous. B.) Anything codified into Halacha as dangerous. The majority of medicinal statements in the Talmud were not codified into law by the Rambam or others. (In the 900s, the head of Babylon's yeshiva of Pumbedisa, R' Sherira Gaon, wrote: "the rabbis of ...


7

הסובל משפתיים יבשות או סדוקות, אסור לו למורח אותן בשפתון או בכל חומר אחר, מכיון שיש בכך ממרח וגם לא ימשח עליהן שמן, והא הדין לגבי מי שנתייבשו ידיו או נסדקו שמירת שבת כהלכתה לד:יג These do pose problems of refuah on Shabbos, see the Rema, Orach Chaim 327:1, MB 327:4. I do not believe we could consider it common for healthy people to apply ...


7

Yes, Zahava, the gemara in Moed Katan 18 says that walking over nails can cause a woman to miscarry. One reason given (Be'er Hetiv/Tola'as Ya'akov) is because Chava caused the loss of "full-body nails". As a consequence, women are put in danger by the nails which remained on the fingers and toes. The gemara gives options of how to dispose of them: ...


7

The Mishna Beroura (260, 6) quotes Gemara Nidda (17a) disapproving someone who would throw nails on the highway after cutting them. Indeed, a pregnant woman could step on them and lose her child. Gemara's conclusion : the one who burns his nails is a 'hassid the one who buries them is a tzaddik the one who throws them is a racha' The practical advice ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible