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Berachot 8b: אני צויתי למקודשי תני רב יוסף אלו הפרסיים המקודשין ומזומנין לגיהנם: "I have commanded to my קדש ones (Yishayahu 13:3)--" Rav Yosef taught: These are the Persians, who are separated (קדש) and prepared foor Gehinnom. When taken with its usage in Torah, we find that the root, קדש means 'separated for a special cause."


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Perfection is not an external criteria which God is subject to or that we define. Rather, He and His will is perfection itself. He defines what it is. Therefore it's not a contradiction. Some sources: "When you look further into the matter, you will see that true perfection (shelemus) is only clinging to God" (Mesilat Yesharim ch.1) that God alone has ...


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Hashem is, first of all, beyond our understanding. EVERYTHING that we see, think, hear, understand etc; including time and space; is all part of Hashem's creation. The Gemoro learns from the Torah that we can give descriptions about Hashem 'כביכול', but it says that without learning it from the Torah, we wouldn't be allowed to give descriptions about ...


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in the shaar bitachon intro: Another benefit for the one who trusts in the Al-mighty, is that his trust will lead him to the following: to not serve other than G-d to not hope in any man, nor expect from anyone (Micha 5:6). to not work to win their approval. to not flatter them. to not agree with them in what is not the service of G-d ...


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you have to distinguish between arrogance and self-esteem. according to the Shaarei Avodah by Rabeinu Yona, the foundation of Avodas Hashem (religious service) and life is recognizing one's own self worth. from Rabbi Zev Leff http://www.rabbileff.net/shiurim/answers/2000-2249/2065.mp3 see there for more hence, the "good" self-esteem is to recognize one's ...


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perhaps it means regarding his mental state as the Chovos Halevavos writes in the intro to the shaar bitachon: One who trusts in G-d is secure against mishaps, and his heart is assured against future (potential) bad things. Whatever comes to him from G-d, he will accept with joy and gladness and his livelihood comes to him peacefully, quietly, and ...


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Lets consider: Abraham, a just man, was self employed and prospered greatly. So much so that he and lot had to part ways for the land could nto sustain them both. Jacob worked for Laban who appears to have been most unscrupulous in his dealings with Jacob. But Jacob prospered no matter which way Laban sought to take advantage of him. Daniel was ...


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I wonder if "Na'ar" and "zakein" are significant in this possuk. And also, it seems to be missing out a reference to the middle of his life? Perhaps these are two stages of life at which one can see beyond, to some degree. So I suggest Dovid Hamelech did have a vision that went beyond what most of us humans can see. And he realized that Tzadikim are never ...


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As the Ma'amar explains, all these attributes are inherently bad. I understand this as chassidus explains that midos are from klipas noga, which inherently isn't holy but can be transformed to holiness (eg food, parchment etc). He explains that if you're going to use self confidence for making yourself feel good important among the affluent, then it's not ...


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He means in depends which direction you are heading in. I.e. you should be able to modulate your feelings of self-esteem or the reverse to pull yourself in the opposite direction which nature is pulling you towards. Let's say you have forgotten God from an abundance of goodness, then you should lower your self esteem. And vice-versa.


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I don't see quite how this question makes sense, as is there a real difference between employment and self employment besides in the modern legal sense? If a person is "in business" aka self-employed, he still takes on jobs for individuals and is accountable to them for an albeit shorter period of time. The added proof you mentioned that he must hire ...


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Rabbi David Sedley wrote an article about Moshe Taku and his corporealist views, in contrast with Rambam and Saadiah Gaon. In the article, he translates sizeable segments of Ktav Tamim which expressly describe his opinions. The article is available here: http://www.hashkafacircle.com/journal/R3_DS_Taku.pdf I understand you requested the original text. As it ...


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According to Shadal: That the Israelites at the time of Moses believed in the immortality of the soul can be perceived beyond doubt from the law that forbids consultation with the dead. Moses implicitly teaches of a blessedness beyond this life when he narrates that Abel’s sacrifice was pleasing to God, and that Abel was murdered soon after, as well as ...


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In the Path of the Just ch.1 Rabbi Moshe Chaim Luzzato says: Behold, our sages, of blessed memory, have taught us that man was created solely to rejoice in G-d and to delight in the splendor of the Shechina (divine presence). For this is true joy, and the greatest possible pleasure that can possibly exist. The place of this joy is, in truth, in ...


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I think I understand you question and I hope to answer it accordingly. I want to start by saying we are advised to not talk about these subjects for their complexity, but nevertheless I will try to give an answer. You assume God's existence is somewhat like a line. He was here for an infinite amount of time and He will forever remain here. Your theory in ...


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G-d has no limitations, therefore one cannot even say that G-d is not limited, for that very statement would be setting a limit for the infinite G-d. The world that we live in and the time that we live in is G-d's will and this world and this time is chosen by Him, at the same time that he is truly infinite. In the Midrash it says that "G-d wanted to have ...


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Genesis 1:26-28: וַיֹּ֣אמֶר אֱלֹהִ֔ים נַֽעֲשֶׂ֥ה אָדָ֛ם בְּצַלְמֵ֖נוּ כִּדְמוּתֵ֑נוּ וְיִרְדּוּ֩ בִדְגַ֨ת הַיָּ֜ם וּבְע֣וֹף הַשָּׁמַ֗יִם וּבַבְּהֵמָה֙ וּבְכָל־הָאָ֔רֶץ וּבְכָל־הָרֶ֖מֶשׂ הָֽרֹמֵ֥שׂ עַל־הָאָֽרֶץ׃ וַיִּבְרָ֨א אֱלֹהִ֤ים ׀ אֶת־הָֽאָדָם֙ בְּצַלְמ֔וֹ בְּצֶ֥לֶם אֱלֹהִ֖ים בָּרָ֣א אֹת֑וֹ זָכָ֥ר וּנְקֵבָ֖ה בָּרָ֥א אֹתָֽם׃ וַיְבָ֣רֶךְ ...


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Notwithstanding the disappearance of the black bird in the closing scene of the Hitch-hicker's guide to the galaxy, which vanished beyond all possibility, your question assumes we are inherently matter, which would be sad if it was true. If on the other hand the universe is a state of mind of God, then understanding his whim in creating us as we are is ...


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Time is an accident (or measurement) of motion and causality. Time is the passing of potentiality to actuality. Olam haba has no further cause as it is the final cause of our existence. The final goal is the attaining to the world to come, and it is to it that the effort must be directed. Rambam, Introduction to Pereq Heleq There are no further ...


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Olam habo had a beginning, it is spiritual and exists parallel to this world (there are stories of people who visit it) There is no chance for us to exist, it is just that G-d Almighty created us,


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The passuk says in Bereishis, vayishalech Chanoch es elokim ve'eneno ki le'kacho elokim. Chanoch walked with God and he is no longer as God took him. The medrash explains Chanoch was a cobbler and with every stitch he made he was meyached yichudim le'kono, he created unity for his creator. The Michtav me'Eliyahu explains this cannot possibly mean he had ...


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Actually the words are "כִּ֣י לֹ֤א רְאִיתֶם֙ כָּל־תְּמוּנָ֔ה -- for you did not see any form". Nothing about seeing something formless. What the Jews did see (Exodus 20:14): וְכׇל־הָעָם֩ רֹאִ֨ים אֶת־הַקּוֹלֹ֜ת וְאֶת־הַלַּפִּידִ֗ם וְאֵת֙ ק֣וֹל הַשֹּׁפָ֔ר וְאֶת־הָהָ֖ר עָשֵׁ֑ן וַיַּ֤רְא הָעָם֙ וַיָּנֻ֔עוּ וַיַּֽעַמְד֖וּ מֵֽרָחֹֽק׃ And the whole nation ...


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Does this necessarily mean that the Israelites perception of G-d was one that was formless, or could it just mean that it was obscured/they weren't privy to it Do not see form. or do not can see form. or concept of form is linked to conceptuability/perceptibility? I think that the first is the minimal and the first step and the pshat. The word Temuna, ...


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I do not understand what you are saying synagogues and congratulations But for part 2 you are probably referring to the saying of our sages Avoda Zara 3a The nations will then plead. 'Offer us the Torah anew and we shall obey it.' But the Holy One, blessed be He, will say to them, 'You foolish ones among peoples, he who took trouble [to prepare] on the ...


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The "work" forbidden on Shabbat does not mean hard, physical work or employment. It is "melacha" = creative work. There are 39 main categories of melacha http://halachipedia.com/index.php?title=Index_of_Laws_of_Shabbat_by_the_39_Melachot So, even if Shabbat would be a "reward" for working the other 6 days (and there is no mention of this - every Jew is ...


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Without commenting on the specific situation, shabbat's rest is an absolute obligation which doesn't depend on what one does during the week. Whether one worked or rested during the work, one needs to abstain from creative work (melacha) on shabbat. Shabbat is not observed because it is a reward but because God commanded so, as a memory for the creation of ...


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They knew it wasn't God from the start: וַיַּרְא הָעָם, כִּי-בֹשֵׁשׁ מֹשֶׁה לָרֶדֶת מִן-הָהָר; וַיִּקָּהֵל הָעָם עַל-אַהֲרֹן, וַיֹּאמְרוּ אֵלָיו קוּם עֲשֵׂה-לָנוּ אֱלֹהִים אֲשֶׁר יֵלְכוּ לְפָנֵינוּ--כִּי-זֶה מֹשֶׁה הָאִישׁ אֲשֶׁר הֶעֱלָנוּ מֵאֶרֶץ מִצְרַיִם, לֹא יָדַעְנוּ מֶה-הָיָה לוֹ. And when the people saw that Moses delayed to come down from ...



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