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Success in life means after you die the honest Wikipedia page about you will read nicely. I.e. you have a chelek in olam habah because you added to the meaningful goodness of the world in face of adversity. People who do not have a chelek in olam habah spoilt their Wikipedia page, they did something more negative than they could compensate for and were ...


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Rabbi Shimshon Pinkus Zatzal in his Sefarim writes that the purpose and reason of Tefila is not that Hashem is lacking anything, it is solely for our benefit in order for us to have a connection with Hashem.


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It's called synchronisity, if you are at the centre of the vortex of what is happening around you then the possibilities of event outcomes impacting on you will synchronise.


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Jewish action deals with the question Does God Have a Sense of Humor? and says that humor is an essential part of the Talmud. Rabbi Hershel Schachter (Nefesh HaRav, p. 69) cites Rabbi Joseph B. Soloveitchik as suggesting that the statement is important for the mitzvah of vihalachta biderachav (following in God’s ways) we are told approvingly that Rabbah, ...


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This is called the Baader-Meinhof phenomenon. It happens when you notice something new or unique and then it seems like it keeps on coming up. It's just a psychological phenomenon and it's well known. What basically happens is that you notice something ordinary once, and after that happens you are kind of tuned in to see it happen other times when you ...


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Perhaps the term chassid would also be appropriate. I'm not talking about its meaning as used today, which tends to mean a person with a long beard, payot, and wearing some type of black robe and a shtreimel on Shabbat and Yom Tov, etc. I'm talking about its original meaning as used in many places in the Mishnah and Gemarah. See Pirkei Avot 5:10 and 11 as ...


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Historically, the ideal Jew in most of Eastern Europe was praise as an "ehrlicher Yid". Unlike the modern favorite of "frum", the implications of ehrlich revolve more around those mitzvos related to honesty, kindness, in addition to meaning observant as a whole. “Frum” descends from the German “fromm“, meaning pious or devout. In pre-war Yiddish, usage ...


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Rabbi Wincelberg translated Rabbenu Avraham ben HaRambam's Kifayet al-Abidin (HaMaspik L'Ovdey Hashem) into English under the title The Guide to Serving God. According to his introduction it is the best translation of the Arabic.


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Actually, the standard English translations of all of the books you mentioned were done from the Arabic, not from a Hebrew intermediary: Rosenblatt's Book of Beliefs and Opinions, Pines' Guide of the Perplexed, Mansoor's Book of Direction to the Duties of the Heart.


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In Hilchos Avodat Kochavim 11:15, the Rambam differentiates between the punisments for a person who actually does magic, versus a person who merely used slight of hand: המכשף חייב סקילה והוא שעשה מעשה כשפים אבל האוחז את העינים והוא שיראה שעשה והוא לא עשה לוקה מכת מרדות I'm sure plenty of readers would love to play with these words and adapt them to ...


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In Mas. Shabbos on daf 118b it says: Reb Yossi never called his wife "wife". He called her "my house". From this gemora I think it's the minhag not to call the wife by her name. אמר רבי יוסי: מימי לא קריתי לאשתי אשתי ולשורי שורי אלא לאשתי ביתי ולשורי שדי


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Regarding the plagues in Egypt, his son R. Abraham writes in his Torah commentary (Exodus 7: 11) in the name of R. Saadya Gaon (9th-10th century) that when the Torah states that "they too did so with magic" it means that they tried to do it. He brings evidence that the term "they too did..." does not mean that they succeeded, from the later verse (8: 14) ...


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How about "ben torah"? (See e.g. here, here, and here.) You could also try "baal middos".


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The Gemara in Taanit 3b says, אמר רבא מעלי תלגא לטורי כחמשה מטרי לארעא שנאמר (איוב לז, ו) כי לשלג יאמר הוא ארץ וגשם מטר וגשם מטרות עוזו Snow is beneficial to the mountains as fivefold rain to the earth, as it is said, For he saith to the snow, ‘Fall thou on the earth’; likewise to the shower of rain and to the showers of His mighty rain. See ...


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As stated above, the 2 Torah places are Shemot 4:6 and Bemidbar 12:10. In both situations, the term is used to compare the color of tzara'at, so the Torah is not using this word in any other context. Rashi on Exodus 4:6:1 (excerpt): מצרעת כשלג. דרך צרעת להיות לבנה (ויקרא יג ד) ואם בהרת לבנה היא My Translation: It is the way for tzara'at to be whiteas ...


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The easy way to find the answer to this kind of question is to search a concordance. Here is an online concordance. A search for שלג reveals that it is used on two occasions in the Torah (Exodus 4:6 and Numbers 12:10), both to describe a tzara'as affliction as a particular shade of white. The word also occurs in various places in Tanach, which the ...


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See Shemot 4:6 and Bemidbar 12:10. There is also reference to frost in Shemot 16:14


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Those interested in the Jewish view on Near Death Experience (NDE) should see the videos from R Alon Anava. He was a secular Israeli, as far away from Judaism as one can, when he had a near-death experience in his thirties after experimenting with drugs. He describes in great detail his experience of hovering over his body, seeing his whole life in front of ...


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Written Torah and Oral Torah are different in kind. Written text is static, an orality is dynamic. Hashem didn't want to hand us halakhah, He wanted us to figure our which path we will take to redeem ourselves. This is an aspect of what it means when it says "these [the positions of Beis Shammai] and those [of Beis Hillel] are the Ideas of the 'Living' G-d. ...


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Shemot 24:12 states that God wrote the Torah. Practically speaking Torah can be divided in three parts: Bereshit - Shemot 12 (written Hebrew tradition), Shemot 12-Devarim 29:1 (Covenant at Horeb) and Devarim 29:1 - end (Covenant at Moab). We need all parts of the story to provide complete picture. Torah is about life of Moses but Genesis explains who God is, ...


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Because it would be impossible to have written all the details of everything that had to be done. In fact there are many things that did not have words available to describe the details of the laws at that time. As an example, consider electricity or using a fax machine on the sabbath. It would have been impossible to write done every detail of every case of ...


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Rav Menashe Klien was asked if one can say kiddush levana on the moon if they are physically on the moon. He answers in his Mishne Halachos 6:259 that there is no difference standing on the moon or earth with regards to saying kiddush levanah. He then writes that going to the moon altogether should be prohibited for two reasons 1) the travel to the moon is ...


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Quick answer is given by the Bartenura in משנה אבות א ג ויהי מורא שמים עליכם - אע"פ שאתה עובד מאהבה עבוד ג"כ מיראה. שהעובד מאהבה זריז במצות עשה, והעובד מיראה נזהר ממצות לא תעשה, ונמצאת דעבודתו שלימה. ‏ וכן אמרו חז"ל, עבוד מאהבה עבוד מיראה. עבוד מאהבה, שאם באת לשנוא דע שאתה אוהב ואין אוהב שונא. עבוד מיראה, שאם באת לבעוט דע שאתה ירא ואין ירא ...


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In Mesilas Yasharim (ch 24), Rabbi Moshe Chaim Luzzato describes three kinds of fear: The lowest is fear of punishment. This is not fear of G-d, but it might be useful for keeping oneself in line. Fear of G-d comes in two sorts: fear of sinning -- not of the punishment, but of the sin itself, and awe of G-d's Grandeur. But when our sages speak of fear of ...


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Love of G-d and fear of G-d are not at odds with each other. The root of love is הב, which means to give. 'Fear' is 'יראה'. This is the concept of action or 'movement' like is found in Tehillim 76:9. This explanation of 'fear' is also found in the introduction to Sefer Reishit Chochmah by Rabbi Eliyahu de Vidas. The concept of fear of G-d means putting into ...


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Astrology is listed as part of prohibition #335 in the list of mitzvot here: Not to practice onein (observing times or seasons as favorable or unfavorable, using astrology) (Lev. 19:26) (CCN166). However, some sources including the Ein Yaakov disagree that astrology falls under the prohibition of me'onein; see here.


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Both fear and love are necessary expressions in our relationship with Hashem, and we are commanded to do both. There are some who say that fear and love are two sides of the same coin, meaning that they are to be equally felt, since we are both His "sons" and his "people". Others say that the lower level is fear, while the higher and better expression is ...


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I know that there are two mashiachs(literally - anointed ones) . Priestly mashiach is Aaron from the tribe of Levi who has 4 sons(Shemot 30:30). King mashiach is David from the tribe of Judah(Bereshit 49:10). Torah does not explicitly specifies the timeline, but many think we are close because of the traditional 6000 years timeline.


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It is fairly widespread, but not normative in the sense that is an objective teaching of Judaism that is incumbent on all faithful to believe. There's also some evidence that one should not believe it. What is meant by 'but at the end it shall speak and not lie?' — R. Samuel b. Nahmani said in the name of R. Jonathan: Blasted be the bones of those who ...


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The phrase "1,000 years is but a day" allows people to connect the existence of the world to the seven days of creation. Thus, each millenium in the existence of the world is the equivalent of a "day" of creation, with the seventh millennium (6001 - 7000) being the equivalent Shabbat. Since the year 6000 is the last year of "Erve Shabbat", the mashiach would ...


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The Gemara says that they gave Malkus to someone who was able to avoid tearing the Besulim, since it showed that he had much experience. There was a special blessing that was said upon seeing the blood. This suggests that there is something special about seeing the open witness to the purity. Chazal allowed Be'ilas Mitzva on Shabbos because it is ...


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Ein ishah koreses bris elah im mi she'aseah kli, a woman only binds herself to the one who made her a receptacle (i.e. who induced her into the realm of biah and child bearing). Therefore if you do as you are suggesting, although this is halachically permissible (Reb Alter Halpern) you will miss out on the intensity of the intimacy between husband and wife ...


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One very notable work of rationalist Jewish philosophy is (Hanivchar) B'emunot V'deot by Rav Saadya Gaon. Written in Arabic in the 10th century, it is the first systematic presentation and philosophic foundation of the dogmas of Judaism. The full text of a 20th century Hebrew translation can be found here. Another very notable rationalist work is the ...


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This question has many possible answers. At different times in history, circumstances were different. And so the answer, depending on where you look could vary. But it seems most appropriate to offer the kabbalistic answer most appropriate for this time. This can be found from the Ba'al Shem Tov as written in Keter Shem Tov, page 3:3. It is preferred that ...


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Written Torah is essentially the proof of God existence. Science (Big Bang) also confirms that all came out of 1 source. Thus there is God and there is only 1 real God. Other gods are not real.



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