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3

The Rambam explains, in line with his explanation of what Kares is, that they are cut off from their own spiritual component, and they remain physical. When the physical world comes to an end (as it will, in the Rambam's world), these people will end with it. They have no connection to spirituality, as they have chosen to involve themselves and invest in ...


0

It would seem from Chulin 7b that killing an animal for no derived benifit is definitely 'bal tashchis'. And there was even a purpose, to kill the dangerous donkey. And yet, it was called 'bal tashchis'.


4

This would seem to be comparable to hunting, minus the sport and danger aspect of it. Namely, killing an animal for reasons other than food or self-preservation. The Nodeh B'yehuda discusses hunting in Mahadura Tinyana Yoreh Deah Siman 10. He writes that there is no prohibition of tza'ar baalei chaim when you are not leaving the animal alive to suffer. He ...


0

I would like to add the fact that in my personal opinion, I believe self help does not have a religion, whether Christianity or Judaism, the idea behind the primary conceptions of self help fall within the idea of one being capable of accepting oneself from within. Self help may not be considered as a religious presence, it is a study of self and despite ...


1

According to Jewish philosophy and mysticism, man is a dual creature, combining both a noble, divine, altruistic drive as well as a base, selfish, physical one. The Jewish people were chosen to be a "light onto the nations" to guide them toward the subservience of the base drives to to divine ones. As such, men who chose to guide themselves by their base, ...


2

To answer the first part of the question, the Rambam in the introduction to Chelek writes: והמקמה הגמורה היא שתכרת הנפש ותאבד ושלא יהיה לה קיום והוא הכרת האמור בתורה. וענין הכרת הכרתת הנפש ... וכל מי ששקע בתענוגות הגופניות והזניח את האמת והעדיף את השוא נכרת מאותו השגב וישאר חומר מוכרת בלבד וכבר ביאר הנביא שהעולם הבא אינו נישג בחושים הגופניים The ...


0

In general, there is no sin for which teshuvah is not effective. See, in particular, Maimonides' Mishnah Torah The Laws of Repentance Chapter 1 Law 11: "עבר על כרתות ומיתות בית דין ועשה תשובה - תשובה ויום הכיפורים תולין וייסורין הבאין עליו גומרין לו הכפרה. ולעולם אין מתכפר לו כפרה גמורה עד שיבואו עליו ייסורין. ובאלו נאמר: ופקדתי בשבט פשעם ובנגעים עוונם - "If ...


1

Though the verse in Proverbs 24 does indeed state: "בנפל אויבך אל תשמח" - "Rejoice not in thine enemy's downfall", the Talmud (Megilla 16a) in an aggadic dialogue between Mordecai and Haman excludes from this the enemies of the Jewish people about whom instead the verse in Deuteronomy 33 is applied "וְיִכָּחֲשׁוּ אֹיְבֶיךָ לָךְ וְאַתָּה עַל בָּמוֹתֵימוֹ ...


0

If the oath was made with the intention to nullify it, i would assume it is not an oath, as he never intended to keep it (and hence it was not le'esor issur) . So, we're talking about a case were the person meant to keep it. In order to cancel it, it must be something new. Although the reason to remove an oath can be weak, the process itself is not a joke. ...


2

"I understand that it is sin to say G-d's name in vain but what about in a sacred way of awe and worship?" Technically, that is ok, but it must be complete. For example: MB 6:3 writes about half way through (from Sefer Chasidim), if a person is telling over a kindness that Hashem did for him, and he starts with Hashem's name, and he wants to finish telling ...


0

Didn't see a source for this anywhere, so don't think it's authoritative. In Kabbalistic thought, there's the concept that some things draw nourishment from higher things. With the concept of חנוך לנער על פי דרכו, if the baby is meant to draw nourishment from the mother, God made it easier for him. Note: without the Kabbalistic part, Answers.com says the ...


1

"It does not say that the purpose of creation of this world is as an arena for man's free will." That is correct. However, that is not what you paraphrased from the lecture, i.e., the purpose of nature. Where does it say this? In the word itself! The word teva means coin, meaning the same thing in Hebrew as it does in English. A coin is something agreed ...


0

The first clear mention is Bereishis 4:7: Is it not so that if you improve, it will be forgiven you? If you do not improve, however, at the entrance, sin is lying, and to you is its longing, but you can rule over it. You can rule over sin.


1

After some consideration, I think the straight forward answer for the Rambam is as follows. The Rambam holds that the purpose of the times of Moshiach is to do Mitzvos to merit Olam Haba. That works nicely for those who will live then, but what about those who lived before? With what will they merit Olam Haba? For that, the answer is Techiyas HaMeisim. ...


1

The Ramchal in Derech Hashem states (as far as i understand) that the purpose of angels/spiritual forces is to give man the ability to make greater impacts and changes. That everything emanates from the infinite, and there is a gradual unfolding of the divine will starting with the most non physical of forces and eventually to more and more physical (ie. ...


3

Rabbi Ahron Lopiansky described angels as being for our benefit. The parable he used was as follows; when a layperson looks at a car, they have no idea how it runs, it is just a car. However when they are able to separate the different parts of the car, they can begin to fathom how the car functions. Per this, angels exist to help us understand creation and ...


0

Rambam (Moreh Nevuchim 1:49) stated that all the instances of interactions with angels seen in the Torah are simply prophetic visions and that angels lack any will or power. Thus, the "purpose" of angels is to act as tools for Hashem when they are needed to help Hashem communicate or maintain the universe. ...


-1

Even though God is omnipotent and does not have needed to rest, but he did so on the seventh day and made it holy. This suggests that although there is no direct need for angels to do His work, it does allow us to better understand how this work is arranged and split amongst various role players. I particularly like the story about the angel of ...


-1

I think that the story of Adam and Eve is just a metaphor used to warn the men not to "know." Think about the apple as the knowledge, the science or the consciousness. This means that the more you know the more you will suffer, and I think this is just a sad truth. Just think about the terrible things humans have discovered, like atomic bombs or radiation. ...


10

This question really touches on what the purpose of the Tree of Knowledge was. Why would G-d not want them to eat from a Tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil? Isn't that the most important knowledge to have? In Moreh Nevuchim 1:1 Rambam develops an approach to understanding this (in which he alludes to your question). As I understand his answer, it is ...


5

First of all, I've upvoted YEZ's answer, as the idea of relating ה to femininity is not related to the letter itself, but to its grammatical function. There are several other examples of cases which I believe answer your question, though besides for YEZ's example, I can only think of one right away: the Maharal (Netzach Yisrael ch. 13), in context of ...


7

In the beginning of the first chapter of Mesillas Yesharim (see also here), Ramchal writes ויתאמת אצל האדם מה חובתו בעולמו....שהאדם לא נברא אלא להתענג על השם ולהנות מזיו שכינתו A person should realize what his purpose is in this world....that a person was not created except to have joy from Hashem, and to benefit from his Shechinah (Divine ...


5

There is discussion in Kabbalistic thought (as well as other sources) about the letter used to make a word feminine being a ה, that the ה is the feminine letter, and is also often related to birth - for example, Avraham and Sarah each had a ה added to their names at the time when they were given the promise that they would have a child. ה is also the letter ...


-2

Being that the founding fathers were conscious of work ethics, 'mind your business' being an early motto, and considering their deep morals, i can't believe that their vision of happiness meant eating and drinking and the like. I would assume happiness meant more along the lines of what we call 'shalom' in the birchas kohanim. This shalom or peace or ...


1

Because it changes your perspective! Praying helps you reset your internal GPS and re-think where your priorities should lie. That's why praying works - the person who finishes praying is different than the person who began praying. This new person may now deserve things which he did not deserve several moments prior. Secondly G-d wants the best for us, ...


1

you could make your question stronger by applying the same question to every mitzvah and not just davening. consider what is a need? what is a weakness? why should I care? consider, what is a need? What does it mean what the Torah talks in terms of G-d's right arm, G-d's eye, etc. We are told that we are created in G-d's image in this way human beings were ...


0

Davening is too broad/general an experience to have merely one answer to the question of why we do it. As Rambam explains (someone link it here), the sequence of Tefillah is: shevach,bakashah, and hoda'ah. At each of these various stages, we are alternately praising God and acknowledging hakaras hatov, being mekabel ol malchus shamayim and ol mitzvos, ...


0

here are some commentaries on chovos halevavos ch.3 which explain this Chovos Halevavos: "Second, the inducing by the understanding does not lead to the recognition of active obligations in the service of G-d such as prayer" Tov Halevanon commentary: Without the torah, the intellect does not understand the benefit of prayer. Because G-d will ...


1

I once heard the following explanation: The word to pray is להתפלל, which is the passive reflexive of פלל, judge. So להתפלל means to cause one's self to be judged. The purpose of prayer is to put yourself before Hashem and test how sincerely you see Him as the source of your needs. So, indeed, the prayer is not "for" Hashem, nor is it to make sure He ...


0

The simplest answer is that we pray because Hashem commanded us to. See here, #22, #23 and #24. Whatever He gets out of it is the same answer to what He gets out of any Mitzvah, and prayer isn't unique in that regard. That being said, when it comes to prayer, it intuitively feels like there should be more to it than that. Answers to that span volumes. ...


0

of course you should. there is never too much love in the world. if being involved with mitzvas and learning Torah doesn't produce caring about others and being kind then something is severely wrong. One thing to take into consideration as a baal teshuvah is who are friends were before becoming involved with Judaism and their influence on us now. While you ...


0

Judaism consists of the religious belief and practice aspect of the the Jewish people. More correctly Jewish is an ethnicity. While Judaism has religious beliefs and rituals someone is determined to be Jewish if 1) their mother is Jewish 2)they have converted by accepting all religious beliefs, practices, and rituals and have been declared so by a Jewish ...


1

I'll say at the outset this answer will be a little interesting, as it is using Kabbalah to answer the Rambam, but it helps be Mekayim R. Weinberg's answer (although it doesn't quite agree with it, I don't think) and provide another approach to this question. The Tzemach Tzedek writes: הנה באלשיך פ' זו הביא משארז"ל בפ' בראשית שבעלילה בא הקב"ה על אדה"ר ...



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