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1

See Does the Zodiac really have influence on our lives? where the view of the Rambam in his letter on astrology is discussed. To summarize, Rambam is of the opinion that astrology is ineffective and that sages who appear to have believed in it were either mistaken or speaking non-literally.


0

Interesting and thoughtful question! Let's start with: Genesis 49:28: כָּל־אֵ֛לֶּה שִׁבְטֵ֥י יִשְׂרָאֵ֖ל שְׁנֵ֣ים עָשָׂ֑ר וְ֠זֹאת אֲשֶׁר־דִּבֶּ֨ר לָהֶ֤ם אֲבִיהֶם֙ וַיְבָ֣רֶךְ אוֹתָ֔ם אִ֛ישׁ אֲשֶׁ֥ר כְּבִרְכָת֖וֹ בֵּרַ֥ךְ אֹתָֽם׃ All these are the twelve tribes of Israel, and this is it that their father spoke unto them and blessed them; ...


4

This understanding of the retrospective way in which even negative history ultimately leads to the culmination of G-d's plan is a very standard Kabbalistic idea. This is not a statement about future sin, which is always undesirable. See, for example, the ילקוט ראובני quoted here: הנה כבר נתבאר, כפי ערך גודל הנשמה, כן הוטבעה בתוך הקליפה, והם מבקשים לטנפה, ...


0

Zohar Shelach 3:157b, while explaining Koheles seems to state a similar hashkafa as the Chassidim


0

"The Ari says that while many rishonim were wrong on kabbalistic ideas the Ramban wa= s always right. R. Zadok says this proves that the Ran erred. He firther states that once the Zohar was revealed one is prohibited from accepting the Rambam and others who held that hasgacha does not apply to every individual and especially not to every animal. Rather one ...


1

Rabbeinu Bachya (in Chovot ha-Levavot), from the 11th century: “We ought to trust in God with the trust of one, fully convinced that all things and movements, together with their advantageous and injurious results happen by the decree of the Eternal, under His authority and according to His sentence.” taken from the comments on: ...


-1

Contrary to your assertion, the Ramban (Nachmanides) does hold that Hashgacha is over everything. Here is a short excerpt from the last Ramban in Shemos Parshas Bo: For a person has no share in the Torah of Moshe unless he believes that all our affairs and experiences are signs from Hashem, that there is no independent force of nature regarding either ...


-1

I don't have any pre-Gra sources for you, but R' Chaim Volozhin makes the point fairly explicitly in Ruach Chaim on the words of mishna 2:8 אם למדת תורה הרבה, explaining the words כי לכך נוצרת: ואמר "כי לכך נוצרת" כי הנה כל אדם נברא לתקן מה, זה דבר זה וזה דבר אחר וכו And it says "for this purpose you were created" as each person is created to ...


-1

"The Ran (in Nedarim) explains that the exception to the rule of DDD is Eretz Yisroel, which the Ran categorically states that Dina Dmalchusa Dina is inapplicable in Eretz Yisroel, since the Torah declares Eretz Yisroel belongs to Hashem (Vayikra 25:23). Since Hashem is the true property owner, and He has encouraged all of Klal Yisroel to live in Eretz ...


1

Personally one thing that makes me yearn for redemption in spite of physical affluence, is the increasingly religiously sterile environment in which western Jewry finds itself. (Described for example in Rupture and Reconstruction). Another thing we lack outside of our sphere of physical comfort is stability within the ranks of the religious. We find such ...


0

Only G-d is a truly omnipotent king. All other rulers are ultimately under the control of G-d as it says "Lev melachim beyad Hashem"


0

Some possible answers (unsourced; edits are welcome): The korban pesach, despite its peculiarities, is an individual korban (group, actually; but anyhow not a single animal for the entire nation.) (OK, the entire nation can combine as a single group, but the korban is effective because of the group, not because of the nation.) The korban pesach is ...


0

I think that what non-Jews consider to be rude behavior by Jews can be attributed to different customs. For example, most white Christians would not dream of talking during religious services or charging a buffet line as if ordered by Stonewall Jackson. In ancient days, non-Jews didn't understand our customs either, some of which seemed rude to them. For ...


0

Rabbi Natan Cordoza points out that the jewish people are indeed the most difficult of all nations. see 34:01 of this audio the Tzants Rebbe in the Divrei Chaim writes: "the torah was given to israel because they are infatuous, tenacious people. By nature, the jews are an obstinate nation, so the torah was given to break their obstinacy with ...


2

As noted here, the Chovos Halevavos makes the argument from overturned ink. However, there is a Midrashic precedent for your recollection as well, cited here: We see this in the Midrash (Midrash Temurah in Midrash Aggadot Bereshit): An athiest [sic] came to Rebbi Akiva. "Who created the world?", he queried. R. Akiva answered, "The Holy One, ...


2

According to this website, Rabbenu Bachya makes this argument in “The Duties of the Heart,” The Gate of Oneness, Chapter 6: Do you not realize that if ink were poured out accidentally on a blank sheet of paper, it would be impossible that proper writing should result, legible lines that are written with a pen? Imagine a person bringing a sheet of ...


3

shaar yichud ch.7 online The analogy of this: When one sees a letter of uniform handwriting and writing style, one will immediately consider that one person wrote it because it is not possible that there was not at least one person. If it were possible that it could have been written with less than one person, we would consider this possibility. ...


21

I agree with the answer Daniel gave, but I would clarify things slightly differently. 1) Orthodox Judaism believes that the Torah is the literal Word of G-d. This is one of the Thirteen Principles of Faith as brought down by Maimonides: "We do not know exactly how the Torah was transmitted to Moses. But when it was transmitted, Moses merely wrote it ...


24

Either what was posted on that forum is about half-correct, or your understanding of what was said was about half-correct. Traditional Judaism does believe that "[H]oly texts are the revealed word of the divine and thus cannot ever be contradicted by modern research, philosophy or belief systems." It is not true "[t]hat it is understood that the scripture ...


2

Rationalism in philosophy is more about the method used to achieve conclusions than the underlying conclusions themselves. Rationalism in religion tends to forbear supernaturalist thinking for scientific style reasoning. Rationalist Judaism as a philosophical school is a relatively modern and loosely defined construct. "Jewish Rationalists" lay claim that ...



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