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-1

The idea that G~d does not have emotions does not make sense unless we think od G~d knowing ablout emotions but not experiencing them. In order for G~d to understand us he must understand how our emotions affect our behaviour. To do this he must experience emotions in the way we experience them, otherwise he is not completely informed. To experience them the ...


7

The Rambam referenced in the question actually deals with the many times in Tanach in which we ascribe emotions to Hashem. In chapter 55 in Moreh Nevuchim, the Rambam discusses Hashem's "emotion" as a literary device used to convey meaning to us an audience. Emotions and moods are transient in nature, and are impossible for the unchanging perfection of ...


5

Judaism is emotional as well as intellectual. Even the highly rationalist Rambam wrote beautiful passages about we should love and yearn for God like one does regarding a desired romantic partner. Early mussar seforim, such as Chovos HaLevavos, are focused to a large extent on developing intense love for God. The Ramak's Tomer Devorah is full of references ...


3

... Yes. Judaism demands both intellectual (atah haresa lada'as) and emotional (tachas asher lo avadata es hashem elokecha bisimcha uvituv levav) engagement. Reaching the level of feeling of Har Sinai may not be entirely reasonable as a daily practice to engage in for the average individual. However, anyone may feel an emotional attachment to Hashem by ...


-4

Malachi 2:16 | Read whole chapter | See verse in context For the LORD, the God of Israel, saith that he hateth putting away(divorce):


3

The Gemara in Yevamos (66a) says that we don't let a Kohen's illegal (Jewish) wife's (Melog) slaves eat Teruma, even though according to biblical law they should, since the Rabbis want her to get angry at her husband (I can't eat Teruma, my slaves can't eat Teruma, What am I, a Zona??!!) and get a divorce. The Gemara doesn't differentiate if there are ...


6

A proof that one should divorce is Ezra ch. 10 where he tries to encourage everybody to leave their non-Jewish wives, he does not tell them to stay together to avoid the mizbeach shedding tears. Furthermore he makes no distinction between any cases.


3

The Ohr HaChaim's commentary to the story of the brother's casting Joseph into the pit has comments relevant to this question. He explains that the brothers felt Yosef was deserving of death because he had testified falsely about them to their father in matters involving a death penalty to a Ben Noach (Ohr HaChaim to 37:20, s.v. ואם תאמר). The brothers ...


0

The Chovos Halevavos (intro) maintains we are under duty to investigate through rational proofs (see Gate 1) and by observing the divine wisdom in nature (see gate 2) as he says in the intro: On this the believer is not permitted by our religion to remain in ignorance, for the Torah exhorts us on this in saying "Therefore, know this day and consider ...


0

First off, I recommend perusing the forum for discussions on ontology, free will, and predestination, as those subjects are absolutely critical to a treatment of your question. I will provide an answer based upon my personal understanding of the issues involved. There are many sources throughout Rishonim, Achronim, and modern rabbis who talk about this and ...


0

The distinction between emotional faith and intellectual faith as described by Moshe Halbertal seems to be practically non-existent. Ultimately, emotionally feeling that God exists as an unverifiable experiential truth is functionally identical to choosing to believe and act as though God exists intellectually. Conceptually, the former is far more ...


6

Tosefos to Bava Kamma 85a says this is exactly what the Torah comes to teach with the repetition of the words "רפא ירפא": שנתנה רשות לרפאות - א"ת והא מרפא לחודיה שמעינן ליה וי"ל דה"א ה"מ מכה בידי אדם אבל חולי הבא בידי שמים כשמרפא נראה כסותר גזירת המלך קמ"ל דשרי (Rough translation) - One may have thought that there is no right to seek healing from a ...


4

R' Ephrayim Oshry answered in MiMaamakim (4:10) regarding someone's question if he can join the partisans. It looks like the Teshuva was written around the time that the extermination camps were just beginning and their existence was still just a rumor. Following this rumor, many ran away at night to join the partisans, saying that this is the only way ...


0

I am reminded of this recollection of a visit by Harvey Swados with the Lubavitcher Rebbe: I began ... by asking his opinion of ... of the controversy about the behavior of the German masses and the Jewish leadership, which has tormented the western world ever since, particularly since the appearance of Hannah Arendt's book on the Eichmann trial. ... ...


2

Rambam wrote a letter on astrology cited and translated here in which he writes: Know, my masters, that every one of those things concerning judicial astrology that (its adherents) maintain—namely, that something will happen one way and not another, and that the constellation under which one is born will draw him on so that he will be of such and such a ...


2

You can't possibly find any classic Jewish sources that discuss making people wicked - for any reason. Firstly: One of the ways to lose your portion in the world to come is by making other people sin. See Rambam Hil. Teshuva 3:6: ו: וְאֵלּוּ הֵן שֶׁאֵין לָהֶן חֵלֶק לָעוֹלָם הַבָּא אֶלָּא נִכְרָתִים וְאוֹבְדִין וְנִדּוֹנִין עַל גֹּדֶל רִשְׁעָם ...


0

Based heavily on this answer of mine The answer to this question is classically understood to be subject to a debate between the Rambam and the Behag. The Rambam did count belief in God as one of (in fact, the first of) the 613 commandments, and proves that it should be counted as such due to a Talmudic comment on the first of the 10 Commandments. However, ...


2

Rashi on the Gemara that says אין מזל לישראל (Shabbos 156a), says: אין מזל לישראל - דעל ידי תפלה וזכות משתנה מזלו לטוב There is a modern Jewish hashkafa that the Zodiac can have an effect on our lives, but we have the ability to "get out of it". אין מזל לישראל means that Jews can be beyond their mazal, and are not bound to it.


2

The wearing of a tallith messuyesseth during tefillah is very important. However, it does not prevent one from praying should the time for prayer arrive and he find himself without a tallith - whether gadhol or qatan. The Rambam in the Mishneh Thorah (Hilkhoth Tefillah 4:1ff) lists five things which prevent one from praying, even if the time for prayer has ...


1

The meditation said before putting on the Tallit godol says, ועל ידי מצות ציצית, תנצל נפשי רוחי ונשמתי ותפלתי מן החיצונים and through the mitzva of tzitzis may my soul, spirit and prayer be protected from (harmful) external influences So it seems that the tallit somehow protects the thoughts of the person praying. O Ch 24 (1) says that ...


0

from a paper on evolution i wrote a while back. Abstract thought. This is expressed in the ability of intelligent speech. True, animals can communicate and have intelligence but it is only a "practical intelligence". They are not able to think abstractly, to hold a thought, ponder it and deliberate on it abstractly. It is because of this that one ...


0

Kohelet - Ecclesiastes - Chapter 3 For there is a happening for the children of men, and there is a happening for the beasts-and they have one happening-like the death of this one is the death of that one, and all have one spirit, and the superiority of man over beast is nought, for all is vanity. יט. כִּי מִקְרֶה בְנֵי הָאָדָם וּמִקְרֶה הַבְּהֵמָה ...


4

Just to give some perspective. This question Why isn't it considered idol worship to give respect to the torah? was met with reactions deeming it practically ridiculous to even ask such a thing. Now let's see what Rava says in Makkos 22b 'what fools all these other people are! Who stand up for a Seffer Torah, but don't stand up before a great Rabbi!' ...


6

Well, we learn (פסחים כב:) that we have to be in awe of Talmidei Chachomim from an extra word in the Pasuk that commands us to be in awe of Hashem - את ה' א-לקיך תִּירָא לְרַבּוֹת תַּלְמִידֵי חֲכָמִים. ‏ The laws concerning honouring and respecting a Talmid Chacham are very severe - as documented in שלחן ערוך - יורה דעה. Here's some samples: סימן רמב ...


0

As per the poster's agreement to accept cases of transgender teva, nature, I will quote a couple of sources concerning Yosef and Dina. The Pirush HaRadal on the Pirkei Drav Eliezer chapter 38 #4 says that Dina who was switched from a male to a female through Leah's prayers retained some of her male nature and that's what led her to leave the house and go ...



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