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13

You might just be asking the wrong Rabbis. However, to give you a sort-of answer to why this is the case regarding specific details of the religion (such as the food question, and similar questions), belief that the Torah in all its details as it's been passed down to us as the will of God is a rational belief. Therefore, even if certain aspects of it ...


9

This is adressed in the Tiferes Yisroel on Avos, ch. 4 mishna 3, oisios 20 & 21. The mishna says ואל תהי מפליג מכל דבר, don't be seperated from anything. The T.Y. explains this to mean not to question any of Hashems creations and to assume there is a good reason for them, even if we don't know the reason. He singles out the fly the gnat and snakes and ...


8

In Mishnah Makkot 1:10 there is a famous passage where, after discussing the laws of witnesses, the Rabbis debate how often the Sanhedrin should order the capital punishment. A Sanhedrin that would execute somebody once every seven years would be considered a violent Beit Din. Rabbi Elazar Ben Azariah says: "Once every 70 years." Rabbi Tarfon and ...


8

I wanted to address the general question without getting into your specific examples of which beliefs require accepting irrationality. G-d is infinite and we are finite. The most basic thing that we can understand about G-d is that He is beyond our understanding. The Rambam writes in several places (Hilchos Teshuva, Moreh Nevochim part 3) that G-d's ...


4

Yishai left a comment with a link to an article, in which the Lubavitcher Rebbe remarks that the mosquito is a creature that only takes, and doesn't give.... The mosquito does serve somewhat as a giver, the Rebbe explained. Its contribution is the lesson it provides for us. The mosquito is the one who teaches us the very concept that to be a G-dly ...


4

The second question about being small in number is flawed, because, we don't believe that everyone should be jews. There are 7 Noahide commandments for the rest of the world, and the 613 for us. Note that the seven basically amount to being an upstanding human being who participates in civilized life. Non-jews who keep the seven are considered by rabbinic ...


3

main thing is to accept the mesora of our elders as explained in the intro to chovos halevavos, but if you want to delve in chakira and have proper guidance and are motivated to strengthen your faith then: First thing that should be clear is that G-d exists. This can be demonstrated either through logical inquiry or more safely through studying the divine ...


3

Rabbi Avigdor Miller was once asked a similar question, I heard the tape. 'Why do we thank Hashem for the food he gives us, when He was the one that created us with the propensity to be hungry? And the answer is because if not for being hungry you would never realize what a gracious gift you received with your wellbeing. If you never became hungry, you would ...


3

There have been several different sects of Judaism almost since the beginning of the religion. The oldest movements were Pharisees, Sadducees, Essenes and Zealots Medieval movements included Karaites and Rabbinical Judaism Rabbinical Judaism split into Chasidic, Orthodox, Reform and Conservative in the US today Other countries have similar ...


3

I once asked this question to Harav Moshe Shapiro Shlit"a, and he answered with the verse from Psalms 113: "והארץ נתן לבני אדם...and the Earth, He gave to people." Here's my understanding of what Rav Shapiro meant, based on Rabbi Luzzatto in Daas Tevunos. The world was given to us to bring to a state of perfection/completeness. Hashem doesn't just want to ...


2

This is a rather famous issue, so much so that Rabbeinu Bachya (1100's) already lists five answers to this question. Later, Abarbanel lists 7 (in his book Tzedek Olamim), and the Kli Yakar (to Vayikra 26:12) collects 9 answers. There are even more floating around Jewish literature (especially in kabbalah and chassidus), but I think that these will suffice ...


2

Your question ignores the reality of the twelve shvatim. Each with its own personality, its own sanhedrin, in some instances a definable different pronunciation of words and according to the Arizal different nuschaos hatefila. Having separate smaller groups is not necessarily a bad thing. I will relate a drasha I heard from one of my rebbeim in beis ...


2

It would seem that he agrees with the Ramban's explanation of the verse. אנכי ה - I am the First Cause that made everything - אלקיך - who is your ruler that you are obligated to serve. He goes on to say that "Who took you out" negates the Kadmus HaOlam, as it shows that He can change nature.


1

Belief can come from a personal revelation. A good friend of mine was planning to commit suicide on our way home from school in 10th grade. He asked of God that a particular song on play next on the radio if God cared and did not want him to kill himself, and that song came on. Belief can come from instinctive conviction and commitment. This past year a ...


1

Rambam In Igeret Teman states that every mitzvah has two 'parts' , or, 'aspects' , the one that benefits you (being away of idolatry, or In forbidden meals there is a health benefit to your body ) , and the part that you are fulfilling the will of god weather that brings your body or mind some physical or spiritual benefit, or not. Rab Elchanan Waserman ...


1

For what they're worth, here are my two sheqalim (having recently moved to Israel myself): The Lubavitcher Rebbe explains, per the Gemara and HaRaMBa"M, that a person's mentor should stand out in three qualities: modesty, compassion and kindness. All too often, I have run across Rabbis who have been know-it-alls or who haven't given me the time of day. The ...


1

In Bereishis 11:3, the people of the דור הפלגה say to each other "הָבָה נִלְבְּנָה לְבֵנִים," "Come, let us make bricks." The Rav zt"l said that this society was unlike the דור המבול -- this generation was "disciplined and well organized," and had a "strict political code." Among other things, they were "aggressive in undertaking, bold in design, and ...


1

The Sabba of Novardok in his sefer madregas haadom has a lengthy chapter on the idea of bitachon. He brings it down as a machlokes between the ramban and the chovos halevavos regarding what hitadlus a person should take. The ramban is of the opinion that no hishtadlus is necessary, so long as a person has bitachon even zero hishtadlus will yeild results. ...



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