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19

Apparently, Rabbi Shlomo Zalman Auerbach says that the three steps are an integral part of Shemoneh Esrei, and should be done whenever at all possible; to the extent that one should move his wheelchair the space of three steps, or ask someone to do it for him if he is unable. Interestingly, he says the same applies to a car! Source: Halichas Shlomo 8:31 ...


12

Certainly the literal sight issue is moot. But we'd apply the same principle, he should not marry someone unless he has good reason to believe it will be a happy marriage. A blind man in fact asked this question of Rabbi Yuval Cherlow of Petach Tikva, explaining that he would normally feel a woman's face to determine if she is attractive. Rabbi Cherlow, in ...


11

The Mishna in Menachot 4:1 states: תפלה של יד אינה מעכבת של ראש ושל ראש אינה מעכבת של יד The hand Tefillah does not prevent the head Tefillah, nor does the head Tefillah prevent the hand Tefillah. So you definitely still wear the head Tefillah no matter what happens to your arms. The Mishna Berura writes (OC 27 sk 1) that if one put tefillin on ...


10

The Rama rules (OC 27:4 based on Teshuvat HaRashba 1:827) that there is only a problem of a chatzitza (separation between the tefillin and the skin) under the boxes not the straps. The Mishna Berura there (sk 16) notes that most later authorities only accept this for the parts of the straps that do not directly relate to the tying (ie. the parts between the ...


9

A blind person cannot make the b'racha of borei m'orei ha'esh on the flame. (Shulchan Aruch OC 298:13) However, he certainly may recite the rest of havdala. (Mishna B'rura 298:34)


8

As you said, Ralbag (and most of the commentaries) understand this to be talking about statues of some kind. (Metzudas David to 5:8 also cites this as a second explanation.) So according to that view of things, David had nothing against the blind and lame people any more than against any of the other Jebusites. Metzudas David's first explanation (to 5:6), ...


8

There is an argument between the Rambam and the Kolbo (who quotes the Gaonim). According to the Rambam, one only blesses Hashem for the benefits that he receives in the order in which he receives it. According to the Kolbo, the blessings are not for his personal benefit, but for the benefit derived by the world. Therefore, one must say all the blessings ...


8

Shaalos U'Teshuvos Rabbi Akiva Eiger 29 says that someone who wrote the number of the day of Sefira he must count still with a Bracha והדבר ברור שצריך לחזור ולספור בברכה. Birchei Yosef 489:14 discusses someone who wrote a letter and in the letter wrote the number of the day in Sefira - that he has to count with a Bracha לאו כמספר בפיו ולא עלתה לו. ...


7

Mishna B'rura (2:12) writes that there are those who say that a toupee-wearer must wear a kippa on top of it because of maris ayin, but there are others who say it's not necessary. In other words: technically, it is a valid head-covering. But since we are worried that people will think that the toupee is his real hair and that he is not wearing a head ...


5

I wrote to the Zomet Institute, which works on techno-Halachic issues, and learned that they have checked and approved such a system, made by Mehalev, for use in a Jerusalem shul called Kehilat Yedidya. They were kind enough to provide me with a copy of the approval letter (.doc).


5

As @Vram mentioned, per Rashi on Hullin 105a DH "Asur Le'echol Gevinah" the reason for the six hour break: is the taste of meat lingering in the throat. Even if you took teeth out of the picture, you still have the lingering taste and should still wait the six hours.


4

Tol'dos Yotzchak (by Rabbi Yitzchak Karo, uncle of the Bes Yosef), in his commentary to 4:10, says that "כבד לשון" refers to an impediment in pronouncing the so-called tongue letters, דטלנת;‎ "ערל שפתים", the lip letters, בומף; and "כבד פה", the rest. ["לא איש דברים", then, would seem to be an all-embracing expression.]


4

Rav Aharon Lichtenstein has a broad analysis of this subject. He dealt with the issue personally when his father went blind late in life. Part I - http://vbm-torah.org/archive/halak66/14halak.htm Part II - http://vbm-torah.org/archive/halak66/15halak.htm Part III - http://vbm-torah.org/archive/halak66/16halak.htm


4

He is chayav (obligated). Therefore if someone else lives in the same home, we have him fulfill his obligation with him by paying him a small amount to partner with him. If he has a wife, she lights for both of them. If not, then he lights with someone helping him (so that he does not hurt himself or start a fire.) SA OC 675: 3 MA 4 סומא אם יכול להשתתף ...


3

According to Ibn Kaspi, "לא איש דברים" means that Moshe was not an eloquent speaker, he was literally not a man of words. This was relevant because God was asking him to be a leader, and good public speaking skills are often thought of as crucial to such a role. No one would ever get elected president or prime minster if they couldn't deliver a good speech. ...


2

Rabbi Dovid Stein of Beit Kenesset Chatam in Rehovot has a large group of deaf people come and read Parshas Zachor from the torah every year. Meaning that each individual comes to the torah and reads for himself. Presumably this is because "krias hatorah" needs to be just that - reading from the torah, and sign language is not considered to fit into the ...


2

See Siman 55 in Biur Halacha: http://www.hebrewbooks.org/pdfpager.aspx?req=14170&st=&pgnum=172&hilite= Summary: Taz isn't too fond of the idea of having a deaf Shaliach Tzibbur. If he is davening, however, according to Magen Avraham, Gra, Bach and others, it appears we should not remove him from the amud. Rabbi Akiva Eiger concludes that ...


2

The חכמת אדם in סימן קיט:יח says that fake teeth or fillings are חוצץ. R' Moshe Feinstien in אגרות משה יורה דעה א׳ צז:ו argues, and says that certainly permanent fillings are not חוצץ and suggests that even removable fillings aren'y חוצץ if they are in בית סתרים. If so, we may extrapolate to other prosthetics. Certainly if they are permanent they should ...


2

See Taz 89:1 or Shach :2 that two reasons apply to waiting, and we wait when either reason applies: that food may be stuck in the teeth, and that the taste of swallowed meat lasts. Thus, assuming you swallowed meat (not merely chewed it and spat it out), you'd need to wait thereafter. If you chewed and spat out the food and then changed your dentures, ...


2

I don't have the sources, but I was told that the commentators say that someone for whom the physical appearance doesn't matter, may marry without seeing the woman. This was stated regarding someone on an exceptionally high spiritual level, but I don't see why it wouldn't apply to someone physiologically prevented from caring about looks. (Maybe there should ...


2

The most famous leaning in Judaism that I can think of is during the Passover Seder. There we lean to show that we are wealthy and like kings. Wouldn't it be that when Davening shmone Esre we are humbling ourselves before Hashem and therefore don't want to appear as wealthy or like kings? Following this logic, people who must have something to lean on ...


2

Remind me, isn't there an interpretation that these were statues of forefathers who had made some sort of peace treaty with them? Or something to that effect.


1

On a clinical level, it almost sounds like apraxia of speech. http://www.apraxia-kids.org/site/apps/nlnet/content.aspx?c=chKMI0PIIsE&b=839037&ct=837215 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XNB0ihI2srQ


1

One of the main reasons we light is for Pirsumei Nisah. It would seem that a blind person also has this obligation.



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