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16

It's amazing what you can find on Hebrewbooks!... In Sifsei Chachamim, by R' Avraham Abba Hertzel (Bratislava, 1899), he says that this is based on the Gemara's statement (Megillah 15b, top) that "that wicked man had all of his treasures engraved on his chest" (evidently meaning that he wore a medallion, or something similar, that had all of his possessions ...


6

The translations I have seen translate it differently, and effectively elide the vav; either קניניו refers to the rest of Haman's household, or to the fact that his sons were his dearest possessions. From Koren/Sacks: His many sons and his household You hanged on the gallows. From Artscroll: His numerous progeny -- his possessions -- on the ...


5

In Riv'vos Efrayim (volume 8 number 267), Rabbi Efrayim Greenblatt suggests that it may refer to Haman's slaves. (He also refers the reader to Or L'avraham on Rus, by Rabbi Avraham Gurewitz (spelling?), page 98; but I don't have a copy.)


5

Perhaps you can break it up like this (M'layl)- you wiped out the enemy of his name (including) his many children and possessions, you hung him on a tree.


5

Haman and the King were the guests. However, as nobility there were servants and "members of the staff" there. The modern concepts of privacy did not exist in those days. Consider that a noble would be able to sit down without considering if a chair was there, because one would "miraculously" appear under him. Thus, Charvonah was standing there waiting to be ...


4

According to Pirkei De'Rebbi Eliezer (Chapter 50), he got his wealth by looting all the treasure houses of the kings of Yehuda and the Kodshei Kedoshim (Holy of Holies): רבי פנחס אומר שני עשירים היו לפנים בעולם, קרח בישראל והמן בשושן . . שלקח כל אוצרות מלכי יהודה ואת כל אוצרות קדשי הקדשים


4

I discovered that the מגילת אסתר of the תורה שלֵמה has some answers: For פרמשתא, citing מדרש רבי עקיבא בן יוסף על אותיות קטנות:‎ פרמשתא, ש׳ ת׳ של פרמשתא קטנה, הסר פ׳ ור׳ וישאר שמתא.‏ This one is hard to translate and explain. So I'll leave it as is. For ויזתא: The Gemara in Megila (16b) says in the name of Rav Yochanan - the Vav of ...


4

R' Rachmiel Zelcer in סימן יב of his נר למאה on פורים cites the צפנת פענח on מסכת סופרים: The name of Agag, king of Amalek, was in fact Hamdata. And "Agag" is actually the title for kings of Amalek. So why does the מגילה call Haman an Agagite (instead of Amalekite)? Since Sanherib mixed up all the nations, we can't be certain that any individual is in fact ...


3

The Rama 690:17 brings the Avduraham who brings the minhag(a minhag one should not make fun of) of banging during the megillah which initially started outside of reading the megillah(little children writing hamans name on a shoe and stomping). The Ben Ish Chai hilchos purim 10 brings the Yaavetz who quotes the minhag of his father to bang by Haman,but the ...


3

Haman is called an Agagite to link him directly to the failure of Saul to kill Agag before he could reproduce. Mordechai and Saul were both of the tribe of Benjamin and it is literately significant that one Benjaminite avenges the failure of another. That is why it is specified that he is an Agagite and not a mere Amalekite. I have also heard that Mordechai ...


2

I was told the following by a Rebbe of mine (My Yiddish is sorely lacking, so can't verify it to be true, but why would he make this up?): In Europe, they made "hamantaschen" out of poppy, which in Yiddish is Mon. A pocket in Yiddish is a Tasch. Mon-Tasch, or plural Mon-taschen, (poppy pockets) were a popular purim snack. The similarity of Mon to Haman ...


2

According to the Ezras Torah Luach, 5774 Edition, pp. 101-102: Rav Henkin noted that the Reading of the Megillah, both at night as well as in the morning, is an obligation incumbent upon every man and woman. Therefore, the reader must have a powerful voice that can be heard by everyone. He must read very precisely, without swallowing any ...


1

The source is אגדת אסתר ה׃ט. See page 30 in http://www.daat.ac.il/daat/vl/agadatester/agadatester03.pdf. The text there is: אני המן האגגי עבדו של מרדכי היהודי שנמכרתי לו בככר לחם אחת


1

The Chabad custom is to stomp feet instead of making noise with one's voice and/or noisemakers. In my experience, this makes it easier to hear the recitation. I'm not sure if that is the reason for the custom, or where the custom originates.


1

The legend is that Haman was not poor, he was impecunious. Haman and Mordechai were both generals of Achashverosh and Haman ran out of provisions. Mordechai split his provisions on condition that Haman become Mordechai's slave. Although Haman had a lot of money in his bank account, he was poor in the field. Source: The only written source I know of is ...


1

The Yalkut Shimoni mentions that he is Hamans son in עמוס 545. The Maharsha (Megilla 16a) quotes this in the name of the Targum. The Hagaas Vehaaros there from Oz Vehadar write that although it is implied there (9:14) it does not seem to be written there explicitly.



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