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6

The Talmud (Arachin 10) asks this question. It answers that since each day of Sukkot has its own unique Korban Musaf (the number of bulls changes each day, cf Numbers 29) then in a certain way each day is its own holiday with its own Hallel, unlike Pesach which has the same Korban Musaf every day (Numbers 28:24) for which one Hallel suffices. See here where ...


6

Hallel on Rosh Chodesh says that this is actually a minhag that has been acceptedby Bnai Yisrael to show that the date has kedusha even though it is not required because we are allowed to do melacha. There is a case in the talmud (from memory) in which an amora was going to stop the Baal Tefilah from saying Hallel until he saw that part of it was left out. ...


4

The source is Shulchan Oruch Orach Chayim 487 (4) בליל ראשון של פסח גומרים את ההלל בצבור בנעימה בברכה תחלה וסוף ובן בליל שני של שני ימים טובים של גליות On the first night of Pesach, we complete the Hallel with the community with a pleasant tune and a blessing at the beginning and end. The same is on the second night outside Israel. The Rema ...


3

Mishnah Berurah (Orahh Hayim, Siman 644, Se'if Qatan 4) states (my translation): וכן כל שמונת ימי החג ולא הוי דחול המועד פסח דמדלגין משום דבסוכות כל יום חשוב כיום טוב בפני עצמו, כיון שחלוק קרבנותיו מיום שלפניו And thus all eight days of the festival And therefore unlike Hol HaMo'ed Pesahh during which we skip [certain passages of Hallel]; ...


2

Very nice and complete answer here from Rabbi Ari N. Enkin In a nutshell The first reason is related to the Mussaf liturgy. According to nusach sefard and sefardi, the Mussaf Kedusha opens with the words “keter yitnu lecha” (“We crown you, our Lord…”) referring to the teaching that the Jewish people, along with the angels, crown God as King of the world. ...


2

The answer above is very good and provide a very valuable introduction for the Sugiah in Gemoro. (Tosfoth Berachoth 14A is the main source "al Hadaf".) But I dare allow myself an additional response because the OP has not been treated[1].With the help of the Taamey Minhagim 436 I found the answer in the Tanya Rabbati[2] (right column,second paragraph, I ...


1

Answer to Q1 from here: A. Some contend that, despite inferences to the contrary, Hallel on Seder night is not a mitzvah but only expresses our rejoicing (Shu’t Ri MiGash #44). B. Alternatively, although there is a mitzvah Seder night to praise Hashem, this praise could be spontaneous and unstructured which would not technically require ...



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