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10

The Gemara (Megilla 14a) gives three answers (punctuation and numbering added): הלל נמי נימא?! 1. לפי שאין אומרים הלל על נס שבחוצה לארץ יציאת מצרים דנס שבחוצה לארץ היכי אמרינן שירה כדתניא עד שלא נכנסו ישראל לארץ הוכשרו כל ארצות לומר שירה משנכנסו ישראל לארץ לא הוכשרו כל הארצות לומר שירה 2. רב נחמן אמר קרייתא זו הלילא 3. רבא אמר בשלמא התם (תהילים קיג) ...


10

If there are three people who recite the Hallel together, the two responsive readings (the four verses ending "Ki LeOlam Chasdo" at the beginning of Psalm 118 and the four "Ana Hashem" verses toward the end of that psalm) are recited as in the Shul: the leader recites each of the "Ki LeOlam Chasdo" verses and the others answer "Hodu" [and the next verse ...


9

R' Howard Jachter lays out and analyzes a lot of relevant sources on the Hallel question here. It's worth reading the whole essay; it packs a lot of material into a short piece. His conclusion is: It is difficult to arrive at a definitive conclusion whether one should recite Hallel with a Beracha on Yom Haatzmaut. Hence, most of those who recite Hallel ...


7

Generally a good idea would be not to do anything that actively shows contempt for the congregation's practice (unless you really feel like you have to be an iconoclast). Stand up when they're standing, sit when they're sitting. You might want to compare, for instance, questions of a fellow whose practice differs from the congregation's with regards to ...


7

Apparently, it's due to a misinterpretation of the m'sora. By the rules of grammar, both should be mil'el, but, according to the m'sora, both are mil'ra. The m'sora was misinterpreted to mean that hoshia is mil'el while hatzlicha is mil'ra, and that's the way people read it now. Source: an old mesorah-listserv thread on the topic, in particular one message ...


5

I can't provide the provenance of the term חצי הלל as sought, but there are examples of חצי's meaning "divided" rather than "halved". E.g., "חצי שיעור אסור מן התורה", which רש״י (to יומא ע״ג ע״ב‎) explains as meaning "פחות מכשיעור".


5

you should look for a minian that do it like you. I heard that the rav of shemuel hanavi (the neighborhood) goes to a dierent minian on this day just because of that, looks like his kehila does halel and he doesn't, so he goes to another minian bigger problem would be a bahur ieshiva, since he needs to pray in the ieshiva. I saw people that because of that ...


5

Dayan Raskin, in his notes to the Rav's Siddur, explains that Raaya Meheimna speaks of 72 motions total (18 for נטילת לולב and 54 in Hallel), while Arizal says to do 72 in Hallel alone. So the compromise is to consider R.M. as talking about where you do נטילת לולב right before Hallel, and then its 18 wavings count along with the ones in Hallel; while Arizal ...


5

There is a famous Meiri (Rishon) which says that if an individual or a community experienced a salvation, they may recite Hallel every year on that day without a bracha. This is why some people say Hallel without a Bracha on Yom Hatzmaut. מאירי פסחים קיז.‏ כל יחיד שאירעתהו צרה ונגאל הימנה רשאי לקבוע הלל לעצמו באותו יום בכל שנה אלא שאינו מברך עליו וכן ...


4

It depends on how you define a "chag,"re. an issuer melacha. It's worth noting that the greeting on Yom Ha'atzmaut is "Moadim LeSimcha liGeulah Shleimah I never quite understood this, but in light of the definition of "chag" as a day on which Melacha is prohibited, perhaps this is the origin of the usage of the phrase Moadim LeSimcha (the greeting for Chol ...


4

Definitely not a halachah or segulah! It might be that once there are no more tunes or recitations to wait for, people just have a tendency to "finish it up." It could also be that you are always a little slower than the chazzan/congregation, but don't notice any friction until the end because of the melodic "buffers" interspersed throughout Hallel. Come to ...


4

The idea is that there should be four shakings in shul. If he said the bracha at home in the sukkah then that is seperate and doesn't count as one of the four. However, if he said the bracha in shul or in the sukkah in shul then that counts as one of the four and he only does three in Hallel (omitting the shaking during the repitition of Ana). I assume there ...


4

We see in many places that if one finishes a bracha before the shatz that he should say amen and that is recommended (SA OC 51:1,59:4. Saying amen prior to finishing the bracha is debated, but only due to the interruption. A possible reason for the distinction between the cases is that saying amen to my friends bracha is seconding my friend's bracha. ...


4

The Gemara you're thinking of is Sukkah 39a, which records that Rebbi used to repeat some verses of Hallel (Rashi: from אנא onwards), while R. Elazar ben Parta repeated from an earlier point - which the Gemara identifies as אודך, as is the present-day practice. Rashi (ibid. 38a, ד"ה לכפול) says that the reason for this is that the first twenty verses in ...


4

The earliest I can find for calling the abreviated Halel "Half Halel" is the Levush (c. 1600): לבוש אורח חיים סימן תפח וכשאומרים חצי הלל כגון בראש חודש וחול המועד Even after him, it is not the standard way of referring to it. Everyone else calls it "Halel BeDilug" which means "Halel with skipping." Note also that the phrase is used earlier at ...


3

When the passuk says Bo B'yamim it means he aged using every minute of his time and didn't waste any. Maybe we say this because we are starting the new month and we should be reminded once a month how important every minute is like Avraham Avinu did and try to emulate him. The Mishnas Chassidim (Maseches Rosh Chodesh 2:6) brings that we say this verse in ...


3

Rabbi Eli'ezer Melamed rules in Peninei Halachah that one must say Halel. He says elsewhere that Rabbi Shlomoh Goren (and Rabbi Gershoni, quoted in the footnote) ruled to say it with a blessing, and this is how Rabbi Tzvi Yehudah Kook acted. He also quotes Rabbi Meshulam Rata (Kol Mevaser 1:21) to say it with a blessing. Rabbi Sharki (quoted in Sidur Beis ...


3

Rambam Hilchos Chanuka 3:5: ולמה מברכין על יום טוב שני, והם לא תיקנוהו אלא מפני הספק--כדי שלא יזלזלו בו. Why do we make a blessing on the second day of Yom Tov, as it was only established as a safek? In order that people do not come to disrespect the day If Yom Tov sheni was dealt with differently, in ways that treat it on a lower level due to ...


3

According to R' Soloveitchik, one should not answer Amen to the shatz's bracha on Hallel because of the issue you've raised. There seems to be a difference between birchos ha-mitzva and other brachos in this regard. The other case where it comes up is the bracha on sefiras ha-omer. (I don't have any source on hand for this, but I've heard it in R' ...


2

I would propose that it is known as Chatzi Hallel even though it is 85% since the 2 parts we do not say are both approximately 1/2 a chapter of Tehilim (Lo Lanu is Tehilim 115 verses 1-11, and Ohavti is Tehilim 116 verse 1-11) which we say the other 1/2 (Hashem Zecharanu is Tehilim 115 verses 12-18, and Ma Ashiv is Tehilim 116 verses 12-19).


2

Classical texts (Rishonim) that I've seen talk about an obligation to say Hallel in recognition of great events benefiting the Jewish People. As far as what it would take for agreement on a new day of Hallel, I personally think that Chanukkah is a great example. Like Yom Haatzmaut, it marked a return to Jewish sovereignty. But also similarly, there were ...


2

The sefer חנוכת התורה here answers that this difference can be explained according to the halachah that it is permissible to benefit from broken pieces of an idol, but if one finds a hand or a foot by itself it is forbidden, because such things are worshipped by themselves. Thus with all the other parts of the body such as eyes and ears it says "they have" ...


2

Per Shaalos U'teshuvos Maharsham 1:1 - paragraph 3 Tosefta Menachos Perek 6 - says that Tefila and Hallel are Meakev each other, that one is not Yotzei Tefila until you say Hallel. However at the end of the paragraph he says that based on the Perisha 122 the main prohibition of interruption is only on the Shaliach Tzibur. It seems to me that based on this ...


1

In Nitei Gavriel Hilchos Arbas HaMinim Perek 44 Sif 3 (with note 3) he brings down there that during Hallel and Hoshanos one is yotzee if they use a borrowed lulav (or similar -- i.e. the dinim of "lechem" do not apply.) In the footnote there he brings this from the Mikorei Kodoesh (Page 78) that since the ninuim of Hallel even on the first day are only ...


1

If I had to guess, it is probably because the other way "incomplete" things are generally referred to is "חסר" (literally, "missing"), which sort of sounds weak or even deficient or, I dunno, inferior. "Half-Kaddish" is also much more than half of the Kaddish, and I would venture to guess (unless someone can provide a source indicating otherwise) that it is ...



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