Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

SA OC 285:1 States the requirement is 2 times mikra and 1 time Targum. It is clear from the commentaries that Targum means Targum Unkilus. 285:2 allows Rashi, stating the both are done by one who fears Heaven. MB 5 (and Be'er Heiteiv 3) quote the Taz, recomending a good explanatory text such as Tzeiena Ur'ena, to be used in place of Rashi, if the person is ...


3

Rabbi Daniel Neustat quotes the Yad Efrayim 551:31 and Divrei Yatziv 2:238 as permitting meat for a Seudas Bar Mitzvah on the day of the Bar Mitvzah. However, for this and all Seudas Mitzvah dispensations, if it is during the week that Tisha B'av falls out, only a minyan plus close relatives may partake of the meat and wine (Mishnah Berurah 551:77). Sha'ar ...


0

Since it is not a seudas mitzvah, the minhag would not be overridden and the prohibition would still apply.


3

It really depends. Was the dish cooked before? If it was, and is a dry food, or is a liquidy food and is still warm (This is the Rema's opinion, the Mechaber requires it to be yad soledes), there is no problem of cooking on a biblical level. If it's a cool liquid, there may be a biblical prohibition (See chazon ish who assumes that Rema concedes that this ...


2

Although the names of the months and angels were brought up from Bavel, as is brought in the yerushalmi, rosh hashanah 1 2, and pointed to in tosafos rosh hashana 7a, the point i haven't seen mentioned but seems very important is that the olei gola returned to Eretz Yisroel from Persia, the conquerors of Babylon. The Persians used a solar calendar and most ...


1

From Halachpedia: If one met one’s friend in the market (in a happenstance way) one may greet him with good morning and not Shalom. If this is a powerful person, and one meets him on the way, one can tell him "Shalom" . This prohibition only applies to greeting someone, but it’s permissible to respond to someone who greeted you. One ...


3

I recently read an interview with a daughter of Rav Ovadia Yosef ZT"L and during the interview she mentioned that her father Rav Ovadia always held a grandchild on his lap during bentching.


2

From One of Rabbi Edley's articles: In the Mechilta (Shemot 20; 8) (The commandment stating to "Remember the day of Shabbat") it states: Rabbi Yitzchak says, ‘Don’t count like the others count, rather you should count for Shabbat’. The explanation is that non-Jews count the days of the week with names, each day has its own name, either names of heavenly ...


2

There is an argument in the Talmud as to whether an action that causes an unintended violation of the Shabbat is permissible to perform. (SOURCE TBA) Rabbi Yehuda claims that violations of Shabbat performed without direct intent are still forbidden (even Biblically, according to most Rishonim). For example if someone drags a bench across a field, ...


4

The Rivevos Ephraim 6:410:1 brings the psak of Rav Eliyashiv that one may hold a child during bentching. In Chelek 8:572:1 he was asked to explain the psak of Rav Elyashiv how its ok since there are achronim who hold by pisukei dizimrah one cannot hold anything so certainly by a doraisa one would have to avoid such a thing. Rav Ephraim Greenblatt(Rivevos ...


5

There is a teshuvah from Rav Shlomo Zalman Aurbach quoted here which says that since the Gemara's examples of animals that we make the bracha on are land animals, we do not make it on sea creatures. If one saw a land animal while submerged in water your question would still apply.


0

When the pot is taken off the fire, it is still a kli rishon. The soup ladel is a kli sheni and the bowl a kli shlishi. However: If the soup ladel gets as hot as the soup it may be a kli rishon as well. Not everybody holds of a kli shlishi. If the soup has a davar gush in it, e.g. noodles or kreplach, the davar gush may be treated like a kli rishon. It is ...


-1

It is lashon kebora (public slander) to participate in public discussions to criticize the moderators. But an intention of lavid mich precludes the ability to taruvo toeem


0

Most of those examples would indeed be considered a floor (with the exception of a Bimah which would be like a table). However, depending on the situation, different halachot may apply. For example, in some situations it makes a difference if the floor was carpeted etc. In other words, if heaven forbid this situation would arise and either Tefilin or a sefer ...


2

This was the subject of a dispute between Rishonim. The Gemara in Berachos 37b says that cooking ( = heating through a liquid medium) bread (meaning baking it, then cooking it) does not remove it from its bread status, as long as it has the appearance of bread אמר רב ששת האי חביצא אף על גב דלית ביה פרורין כזית מברך עליו המוציא לחם מן הארץ אמר רבא והוא ...


1

O Ch 191 (3) MB [8] says that one may not do a melacha while saying birkas hamozon. The MB says that even a תשמיש קל (a light activity) is prohibited. If holding a child is a light activity (or more) then it would be forbidden. In O Ch 183 (12) MB [37], it says that one may not make a brocho while doing work and the MB and Shaar Hatziyun say that this ...


-3

Artificial rain is teruvin halapath and this is considered as panim hokarath which means that you can make mikveh using artificial rain.


2

Shulchan Aruch Orach Chaim Chaim 184:5 says one has until the food digests, which is determined by a hunger caused from that eating. Therefore, as soon as one is hungry again (even though digestion has not yet completed), he may no longer bentch. Mishna Berurah 20, and more clearly in the Biur Halacha, says this is at least 72 minutes.


3

I asked the proprietor of the Beis Medresh in question, and he said the main issue is קריע - tearing. It is a discussion in Achronim (see here) exactly what the nature of tearing is that is forbidden. Following the view that it is separating two things that are glued or woven together (quoted in the פלא יועץ in the name of the Baal HaTanya and the Brisker) ...


2

It seems that poori is deep-fried, in which case it is not bread (not even pas haba b'kisnin) and is always mezonos/al hamichya no matter how much is eaten. (Deep frying is the halachic equivelant of cooking. See The Halachos of Brachos by Rabbi Pinchos Bodner, ch.27.)


2

The sefer Chayei Moshe, by R' Moshe Mendel Shklarsh, in his section on Klalei Psak V'Halacha, discusses yuhara. He writes that it only applies to be stringent in public on something that, min hadin (according to the basic law) is permitted. (At the end of the discussion he mentions that some say it can even apply to private practices.) There is a special ...


-4

Yes, you would be allowed to if the neighbor is Jewish. In fact, not using it when it the alternative would be less costly is אסור– you're not judging him favorably. If you were, you would come to the conclusion that your friendly neighbor is graciously letting you use his network for free by not setting a password.


0

No, you're not responsible, just as you aren't responsible if you send your friend a bottle of wine that gets poisoned somewhere along the way. As long as you didn't knowingly infect his computer, you're OK.


3

Aruch HaShulchan Orach Chaim 184:7 & 8 says that we don't know how to determine if one is still full, therefore one should say Birchas HaMazon within 72 minutes of completing the meal. If it is beyond 72 minutes then one should eat another Kezayis and then say Birchas HaMazon.


4

HALACHIPEDIA has part of its entry on Birkat HaMazon that deals with the question. The numbers refer to the references – please see the original especially ref 21. It's not the distraction that matters so much as the time and how hungry you are - see below. How long does one have to say Birkat HaMazon? If one ate bread and is full, preferably ...


1

All of this reposted from http://www.berachot.org/halacha/12_shiurberacha.html Time Lapse (max) - From when you are done eating, how long do you have to say the bracha achrona? There is a difference between Bread and all other items in this regard: Bread: Ideally, one should bentch within 72 minutes from when he stopped eating, since within ...


1

Rambam Hilchos Melachim 5:9 based on Mesechtas Avoda Zara 13a says that one may never leave Eretz Yisrael. However the Gemara allows one to leave for various reasons, such as learning Torah, marriage, and business. Thus it would follow that one who has his business, wife, his learning set up outside Eretz Yisrael should be allowed to leave Eretz Yisrael ...


9

Considering the fact that the Torah only writes of one's relationship to one's parents in terms of fear and respect, it would seem that the answer is no (note this Rabbi's answer's bold sentence). The Chayei Adam, however, writes in the beginning of the Laws of Honoring Parents: פשיטא שצריך לאהוב אותם כגופו שהרי הוא בכלל ואהבת לרעך כמוך אלא שבאביו ...


2

The Mishna Brurah 227:5 writes : על כל אחד וכו' - והעולם נוהגים לברך על הברקים עושה מ"ב ועל הרעמים שכחו וגבורתו וכו' וכן מסתבר שע"י הרעם נראה גבורתו של הקב"ה יותר מבברק אמנם באמת שייך כל אחת מהברכות על שניהם וע"כ אם שמע ברק ורעם כאחד מברך ברכה אחת דהיינו עושה מע"ב על שניהם ואם בירך שכחו וגבורתו מ"ע ג"כ יוצא. ואם לא היו תכופים זה אחר זה מברך תחלה על הברק ...


0

If one is wearing glasses he does not need to take them off rather he can place his hand over them(Oz Nedabru 12:53)


2

The Mishna Berura (301 sk 158) quotes an argument among Rishonim and Achronim about whether a woman who finds Tefillin in public on Shabbat may wear them as amulets to "carry" them back to a safe place. The debate centers around defining normal modes of wearing clothing. He doesn't cite anyone who suggests that the Rama's exhortation (OC 38:3) of "מוחין ...


-2

According to Rav Moshe the issues with Marijuana are as follows; After reading his Teshuva, along with the last line " that is clear and evident that it is one of the strongest prohibitions" It seems clear that it is not permissible to sell, if not for any other reason then to not put a stumbeling block. אגרות משה יורה דעת חלק ג' סימן ל"ה. The law of the ...


-3

The question can be expanded to the Jew selling animal products, of which he is forbidden to consume. This is definately permitted providing the recepient is not known to him to be Jewish or the kind of goods is not intended to be used in a forbidden way. Thus a pig-skin leather shoe may be traded between Jews. Similarly dogs can be kept by Jews (for reasons ...


-3

This prayer is a celebration of life. It can therefore be recited whenever something happens and which is a new experience. This includes graduation from school, college, etc. It seems to me that one could even say it on waking in the morning, although we do have other prayers for this.


4

The Rambam (Kilayim 1:3) and the Shulchan Aruch (YD 297:2) explicitly rule that the issue of Kilaei Zeraim (planting mixtures of edible seeds (except grapes)) only applies in the Land of Israel and a Jew can even plant his own mixtures outside of Israel on purpose.


5

Getting divorced would NOT serve as any halachic basis for an abortion. Life is something of the greatest value and should not be looked upon lightly at all. It is exceedingly important that no one misinterpret halacha to try and "allow" for an abortion when it's forbidden (and a major sin). The baby - who is unable to speak and defend himself - is the true ...


5

"Purification?" No. (And this kind of thinking has unfortunately lead to OCD in some people.) Technically, if I eat a non-kosher-slaughtered chicken, that renders me "ritually impure", and I can't enter the Temple until I do a ritual bath and wait until nightfall; but those laws are generally moot with regards to the world in which we live today. Eating ...


1

In very, very broad terms -- some authorities will allow an early abortion to prevent significant anguish. (There's an mp3 of Rabbi Yona Reiss mentioning this with regards to a pregnancy found to have severe developmental challenges, if we think it will destroy the lives of this couple, according to some opinions.) While it's ideal for most children to be ...


4

I found a Minchas Yitzchok (5:32:2) and an Az Nidabru (2:30) which prohibit, and a Shmiras Shabbos Kihilchasah (ch 18 note 70) which permits. I have seen the Az Nidabru misquoted as permitting. What he actually says is that people who sit out in the sun are only doing it because it's enjoyable and not to get a tan, and therefore it's permitted. ...


1

While one listening to Kiddush doesn't need to drink ANY wine, one should preferably drink some wine - ideally Kos Shel Bracha. The Shulchan Aruch actually writes that one shouldn't drink from the same cup as another. According to the Shulchan Aruch Harav, though, if the wine was poured out into other cups before Kiddush, those are also considered Kos Shel ...


-2

Tzitzis are never required to be worn all day. However we who choose to wear them at all times have no diffrentiation between at home or outside. A kippa may or may not be a different story but as far back as the times the shulchan aruch and maharshal seems everybody was wearing them everywhere.


7

In the Sefer Avnei Yashfei 4:109:2 was asked if a sefer Torah fell inside the Aron Kodesh does one have to fast. He writes that one does not have to fast(there is more savoros but put in whats applicable here), the main reason being that it is not a place for walking like the Atzei HaLevanon 2:71 writes(he is quoted in previous part of tshuva regarding some ...


3

I don't believe that there's a 'one size fits all' answer to the more general question of how we define a floor in halakha, but we may be able to extrapolate a few principles. We can import a halakha from the laws of shabbos (and sukka): levud. This means that anything withing 3 tefachim is considered attached. If a step etc. is raised slightly off the ...


1

The Sefer Avnei Yashfei 8:54:1 writes that if one forgot to put on teffilin and was mekabel shabbas after plag and even made kiddush(actual story happened) he can put on teffilin since he accepted shabbas by mistake and would not forgo his mitzva of teffilin if he remembered. He brings a few sources for support,the Taz 600:2,The Shoel U'Mashiv 2:23 and it is ...


2

Ovadia Yosef holds that women, married and unmarried, ideally cover their heads when they say shem u'malchut, regardless of location or others' presence. In a Yeminite shul, unmarried women will be asked to cover their heads and I have seen unmarried Yeminite women cover their heads to light and bless Chanukah candles. For those who are interested in the ...


0

It's confusing to me that no one cites the next line of this Gemara (Yoma 47a) which I have helpfully put in bold below: Tanu Rabanan: Kimchit had seven sons and all of them served as Kohen Godol. The Sages said to her: "What did you do to merit this?" She replied: "The walls of my house never saw the hairs on my head" Replied the Sages: "Many women have ...


4

The Magen Avraham (44, 5) refers to the custom of fasting if a sefer torah or tefillin fall onto the ground. He does indeed use the words 'al haaretz'. (Seemingly the only difference between sefer torah or tefillin in this law is that one fasts for a sefer torah falling even if it was in its wrapping/container.) The Mishna Berura cites the Magen Avraham (40, ...


5

R. Neuwirth in Shemirat Shabbat Kehilchata (16:24) writes that one should not wear ordinary sunglasses in a place where there is no Eruv because they are not considered clothing. However, if the sunglasses are never taken off even indoors (eg. for medical reasons) then they are considered clothing and can be worn even outdoors with no Eruv. In footnote 94 he ...



Top 50 recent answers are included