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8

Avos DeRabbi Nasan (7:3) defines the problem as bringing home gossip to your wife, how you were treated negatively, how you treated others in response, etc. According to that, the medium of communication - speaking, writing, in person or at a distance - seems irrelevant.


7

R. David Zvi Hoffmann (Shut. Melamed Le'Hoil 1:42) was asked whether a G-d fearing Jew is obligated to do "everything possible" to evade service in the German army, "where he is forced to violate shabasos and yamim tovim." His conclusion, after detailed analysis, is that he is not obligated to, and it is better not to, as if this becomes known it will cause ...


5

It is a practical matter. It is easier to wash without letting the unwashed hand touch the washed hand if the cup has two handles. Why the two-handled washing cup? After the first hand is washed, it is clean and pure. The unwashed hand, however, is not. If the two hands touch after the first hand was washed, it is necessary to rewash the first one. ...


3

Birchas hagomel is only said if one has an illness and has recovered from it. If one never had an illness in the first place only a suspected one there is no reason to say birchas hagomel.


3

Sechita is a term that derives from the labor category of dash, threshing. The technical definition is "removing a product from its natural container." This therefore includes: Removing a wheat kernel from its husk Squeezing grapes for juice Milking a cow And somewhat differently, Wringing out a wet rag. Apparently water absorbed into a porous material ...


3

There are two unrelated issues being conflated here. One is the halacha of makom kavuah. Your father is correct that it does not need to be a specific seat, as the Mogen Avrohom 90:34 writes that makom kavuah is satisfied within 4 amos. However, if you buy a specific seat, then you have a right to that seat. I am not buying a "makom kavuah" but rather a ...


2

Vayifga Bamakom quoting Magain Avraham 42 says that anything within an 8 Ama radius is considered the Makom Kavua.


2

If one's parents give permission for one to do so, then one may. For example, I was asked by my mother to say kaddish for an aunt who died without any children. However, if the parents object, then it is a matter of Kibud Av Ve'Aim (honoring one's parents) because they could regard it as expressing a wish that for them to die. As seen in the sources, it is a ...


2

The Tosefos Rosh to Niddah 13a writes that it is forbidden because of bittul peru u'revu, nullification of reproduction. He asks why it still applies to one who has fulfilled peru u'revu and answers that even after fulfilling the requirement of reproducing a man still continues to fulfill the mitzvah as a result of ולערב אל תנח ידך, which the Gemara in Haba ...


2

Harav Beari addresses this question here: He asks firstly whether it is dependent on the obligation to learn Torah, which is primarily a Mitzva for men (as opposed to children), etc. He quotes the 'Tzafnad Pa'aneach' who explains why children can make a Siyum, before questioning whether there may be a difference (as children may have more of an obligation). ...


2

The organisation Vaad Hakohanim puts out useful information on keeping away from tumah for kohanim. Particularly useful is The Kohen's Handbook A complete guide in English to help today's kohen guard his spiritual purity . Hospitals are a special problem because nearly all contain amputated limbs and other body parts as well as aborted fetuses. The ...


2

I think you are being a bit mislead by the translation of "The stranger who resides with you". In Hebrew it is using the verb form of the same word: Ger. The definitive reference to a Ger Toshev is Devarim 14:21: לֹא תֹאכְלוּ כָל נְבֵלָה לַגֵּר אֲשֶׁר בִּשְׁעָרֶיךָ תִּתְּנֶנָּה וַאֲכָלָהּ אוֹ מָכֹר לְנָכְרִי You shall not eat any carcass. You may ...


1

It didn't "disappear" because it wasn't one in the first place. The first sentence of the article you linked to clearly says: "the stranger referred to in these verses is the proselyte who converts and comes to live amongst the people of Israel." The Chinuch (431) adds that we can learn from this mitzvah to be compassionate to people who are not in their ...


1

While a Cohen must be fastidious regarding ritual purity, there are discrete limits to how far we require them to go. Generally, we prohibit them from engaging in activities in which contact with tumas meis would be inevitable (see discussions on a Cohen attending medical school). There is no inevitability to someone dying in their apartment building. ...


1

As has been discussed previously: The Gemara in Sanhedrin asks why "dice gamblers" are invalidated from being witnesses. One explanation is that when people gamble they're not entirely cognizant of the likelihood they'll walk away with a loss, so it's ill-gotten gains. The other explanation is that it applies only to those who are professional gamblers, "as ...


1

Cards are not specifically mentioned in Gemara as far as I'm aware but there is a mention of players of dice games, in Sh'vuot, where it says that such people are not acceptable as witnesses (to claim money owed to them or admit to a partial debt in court when the disagree on the full amount). And it means they play dice for money (e.g. craps or whatever ...


1

Since the glass or bottle of wine is on the table when the original beracha of "borei pri ha'gafen" was made, I don't see why one should consider making "hatov ve'ha'maytiv." On a secondary note, I seriously doubt that anyone can notice a marked improvement in a glass of wine afte five minutes unless they talk themselves into it. I used to sell wine and ...



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