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15

I have no time to read the article - and therefore do not endorse anything they write. The Rabbis instituted that Holy Books like a Sefer Torah would defile the hands. Why? Because people would keep their Teruma (tithes to be given to the Cohen) with their Holy Books. This was to prevent their Teruma from becoming Tameh (impure). The rationale was the ...


5

It seems that R' Moshe Feinstein allowed one to provide fire/matches to a smoker, and did not think of this as lifnei iver. Igrot Moshe, Yoreh De'ah part 2, 49 (last sentence): Find more about this subject here.


4

Apparently there is a confusion in this question. When we speak with words specific to the modern language, and innocently utilize such words to translate the Torah, appear a confusion. If an adultery between a young bride and a man is heterosexual, You can change the title as "Stoning the heterosexuals" In the Greek antic civilisation, the practice of ...


3

Proper pronunciation and proper distinguishing of letters and vowels is halakha. How must one enunciate? He must be careful not to pronounce [a letter with] a strong dagesh as if there were no dagesh, or [a letter with] no dagesh as if there were one. Nor should one pronounce the silent sheva or silence the pronounced sheva. Hil. Kriath Shema' 2:9 and ...


3

It is based on the difference between a tefillah and a bracha. The difference is that one can be yotzi when someone recites a bracha (as with hamotzi) but must recite a tefila personally (as with shmona esrai) unless with a minyan and in extraordinary circumstances (which is the basis of chazaras Hashatz) We see at Kollel Shaarei Horaah HaRav Shmuel ...


2

The Talmud (RH 4a) tells us that Tzedaka, like any other Neder, is included in the Biblical prohibition of Bal Te'acher (don't delay paying up your vows). However, unlike ordinary vows for sacrifices for which one does not violate unless they don't bring the sacrifice before 3 consecutive festivals have passed (Rambam Maaseh Korbanot 14:13), the Talmud tells ...


2

The Rosh in Berachos ch. 4 siman 2 writes .וי"ל דנהי שהיא רשות אין לבטלה אם לא מפני צורך שעה כגון מפני מצוה עוברת ושרי המייניה דלא מטרחינן ליה בפ"ק דשבת דף ט: וכן עלה על מטתו בירושלמי דאין מטריחין אותו לירד Granted that [maariv] is optional, [nonetheless] one may not omit it without a timely reason, such as a time-sensitive mitzvah, or [the case of] ...


2

Rambam Metammei Mishkav uMoshav 2:6 says that if a Zav's saliva fell into water and it dissolved into the water then everything is Tahor assuming the water hasn't changed color. Looking at further cases there (eg. urine of a Zav mixed with urine of a Tahor person) it seems that in general we go by majority assuming the item in question isn't still detectable ...


2

You're looking for the Rama in ShA OC 111:1 who quotes such an opinion, but isn't so excited about it. CYLOR as final rulings differ.


1

Yes, lechatchila this should be avoided (according to some, lest the following two assumptions don't actually hold in this case), however it is generally allowed (to most sources that I found) because the soap "פוגם" any piece of food (i.e. makes it inedible), and secondly, people do not wash dishes with boiling water (and therefore the taste is not ...


1

I'm afraid I don't understand how 3) is a question. If anything, it seems to be the answer to 1) and 2). Which is to say: It is human nature for a man to defend his property even at risk of life. The ba bamachteres knows this and still pursues the theft. The assumption is that he would murder the homeowner if confronted. As such, the chidush is that he is ...


1

Bottom line it depends what you're putting it on for. From Dose of Halacha: ..The Mishna Berura (14:11) writes that when one borrows a friend’s Tallis to Daven for the Amud, one should make a Bracha. The Aruch Hashulchan (OC 91:2) and Kaf Hachaim (OC 147:4) write that one who receives an Aliya (or any other Kibbud) should wear a Tallis out of respect for ...


1

Assuming that your question asks in general, if one who has already made a blessing earlier in the day on either the tallit katan or the tallit gadol, the answer is in Shulchan Aruch OC 8. He states that whenever there is a hefsek (interruption), one must make a new bracha on the tallit. I think Magen Avraham does mention a possible exception regarding the ...


1

Rabbi Hassan describes the problem here: Now is there a problem for Sephardim? This is a complicated area of halakha but I will try and write as short and as clear as possible. Rav Yosef Caro (Shulkhan Arukh O.H. 345:7) wrote that the definition of a public domain is a street that is 16 amot wide (32 feet) or more that are not enclosed. Some say ...


1

Ba'er Hetev note #8 says that one who isn't listening is not included as part of the minyan, and this includes even one who is a pike'ach. The term pike'ach refers to someone who is deaf but can speak (vs. a cherish who can neither hear nor speak.) So, I'm focusing mainly on your 2nd bulleted item, here and making some logical conclusions: It is already ...


1

Rabbi Avigdor Nebenzahl (notes to Mishnah Berurah 1:2) quotes the Vilna Gaon as saying that after the martyrdom of Graf Potocki (the famed “Ger Tzedek of Vilna”) in 1749, ruach ra'ah was no longer powerful enough to mandate washing immediately upon rising. From a more technical perspective, Shevut Yaakov (3:1) notes that this ruling is nowhere to be found ...


1

According to Rabbi Kaganoff's article: Yet another stringency is that one should be careful not to touch food without first washing away the ruach ra. However, if one did touch food prior to washing, the food may be eaten (Shu’t Shevus Yaakov 2:105; Artzos Hachayim, Eretz Yehudah 4:4; Darchei Teshuvah 116:35). If I have a chance to get to any of ...


1

The original question as well as @SAH challenge seem to imply that the Torah forbids piercings. This belief is possibly coming from the prohibition of tatoos as the prohibition to injure oneself. But as we will say the halacha doesn't necessarily consider all body piercings forbidden. As context, plastic surgery (a more extreme form of bodily injury for ...


1

my inkling is to say you should not stop wearing it based on the idea of maalin bakodesh v'ein yaridin (one goes up in holiness but no down) The idea being that once you accept upon yourself wearing a tallis you wouldn't stop. Not the same but related is a divorced man or a widow would not stop wearing his tallis.



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