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20

From Rav Aviner's tshuvot (text) Wearing Wife's Jacket in the Cold Q: Is it permissible for a husband to wear his wife's jacket if he is cold, or is it forbidden on account of "Lo Yilbash" (the prohibition of cross-dressing)? And what about visa-versa? A: It is permissible, since the purpose is not to wear it but simply to warm up (Shut ...


15

The Shulchan Aruch was written by Rabbi Yosef Karo in the mid-sixteenth century. That is the reference to #1 ("stam" means plain, without any additional qualifications. Since then, others have appropriated the name or made names that have allusions to it, when writing books which have a similar purpose - to structure and organize Jewish Law into a relatively ...


12

You don't need a special knife for shechitah, though it's recommended. The Simlah Chadasha (18:16) says that, in order to have a fallback option in case one's knife is lost before he could check it after (and didn't check it before), he can rely on the fact that his special knife (that was put away, and is never used for anything else) is probably free from ...


7

In the Sheilos U'Teshuvos of the Maharsham (Rabbi Shalom Mordechai Shvadron) Chelek 4 Siman 146 he writes to a Rabbi in the city of Leipzig the following (my own translation with added clarifications): To answer your letter from the 2nd day of Chanuka, if it is permissible to light the Chanuka candles on the train - I did not find the matter to be so ...


6

This question is dealt with by Dose of Halacha: R’ Yechiel Yaakov Weinberg (Seridei Aish 1:46) writes that the acharonim are lenient regarding plastic and such utensils may be kashered through hagalah (placing in boiling water). R’ Eliezer Waldenberg (Tzitz Eliezer 4:6:3) compares plastic utensils to stone ones and permits kashering through hagalah. ...


6

I found the following teshuvah by R. Betzalel Stern, BeTzel HaChochmah 2:16: Regarding someone who travels by airplane from Australia to Israel, and on the way flies over mountains and deserts...In my humble opinion, it seems obvious that as long as he has a clear view, even though he only sees them from a plane flying miles above, he is ...


5

The prohibition comes from Devarim 22:5, for which Rashi provides commentary as follows. Please click on the image to view "full screen" mode. Rashi is citing from the relevant section of the Babylonian Talmud (b. Nazir 8:1a, II.4.E [Folio 59A]), which appears as follows. Please click on the image to view "full screen" mode. The yellow highlighted area ...


4

The Emes L'yaakov (by R' Yaakov Kamenetsky) on Parshas Miketz is clear that they may not be used even for Mitzva use. He compares Chanuka lights - forbidden to benefit from - to Shabbos candles - we benefit from as they bring Shalom into the house. הנה לכשנתבונן בב' מיני נרות שנצטוינו להדליק נר שבת ויו"ט ונר חנוכה, הא' ניתן להשתמש בו ואדרבה בלא תשמיש א"צ ...


4

The Chochmas Adam 89:1 wrote that the Vilna Gaon abolished the minhag of decorating the synagogue with trees in honor of Shavuos because of the problem of Chukkas HaGoy (i.e. the practice of decorating a tree for the Christian's Holiday). The Chochmas Adam held that such a problem would even justify nullifying a practice mentioned (but not commanded) in the ...


4

Only kelim (vessels) which absorbed issur (forbidden substances) need to be kashered. A kli which may have issur stuck to the surface, but not absorbed should be scrubbed. Keilim which were only used with kosher are clear to be toiveled. See Shulchan Aruch, Yoreh De'ah 121. Another point concerning old keilim is to make sure there is nothing on the surface ...


3

I'm comfortable to say that no opinion in the Talmud holds this way. The first reason is that, having learned Kiddushin and perek Yesh Nochlin of Bava Basra, two of the primary places where this discussion comes up, I have never come across a third opinion. The second reason is that the reasoning which many Acharonim give for the dispute of R' Meir and R' ...


3

In short, sometimes another milah is required, and sometimes not -- it depends on how much skin is left over. The Mishna says (Shabbos 19:6): אֵלּוּ הֵן צִיצִין הַמְעַכְּבִין אֶת הַמִּילָה, בָּשָׂר הַחוֹפֶה אֶת רֹב הָעֲטָרָה. וְאֵינוֹ אוֹכֵל בַּתְּרוּמָה. וְאִם הָיָה בַעַל בָּשָׂר, מְתַקְּנוֹ מִפְּנֵי מַרְאִית הָעָיִן. מָל וְלֹא פָרַע אֶת ...


3

It would seem to be problematic based on information from sites such as this http://www.quora.com/How-do-Flavia-machines-work It seems a pipe or needle is poked into each packet to inject the hot water. If that is in fact the case, then that pipe will absorb the flavors from the nonkosher items, either through contact or steam. After which it will mix in ...


3

Ramban considered taking possession of and settling the Land of Israel to be a Torah commandment. He listed it as the fourth positive commandment that, in his view, Rambam neglected to include in his Sefer Hamitzvot. ‏... הכל הוא ממצות עשה הוא שנצטויני לרשת הארץ לשבת בה, א"כ היא מצות עשה לדורות מתחייב כל אחד ממנו ואפילו בזמן גלות ...‏ ... ...


3

The Beis Hab'chira (maseches Shabas 23a - "mi she'ein lo l'hadlik" on the lower left) quotes and approves of the opinion that if one has no access to Chanuka lights of his own and cannot see others' then he should say the b'racha of she'asa nisim... anyway, implying that seeing lit lights is a catalyst for the b'racha but that it essentially applies to the ...


2

As explained in this Weekly Halacha column by R' Doniel Neustadt, the problem with steam is that the steam from the second dish will rise up, absorb flavor that the first dish had deposited into the oven walls, and then condense and fall back into the second dish, thus adding flavor from the first dish to the second dish. R' Neustadt records a disagreement ...


2

Shulchan Aruch Yoreh Deah 131:1 says in part: ישראל שעשה יינו של עובד כוכבים בטהרה כדי שיהא מותר לישראל בין שמכרו לישראל ולא פרע לו מעות בין שלא מכרו לו אלא שהוא מטהרו כדי למכרו ע"י לישראלים ... אסור אפילו בחותם תוך חותם עד שיהא ישראל יושב ומשמר ... See the entire sif for the lengthy point, but the bottom line is that even double sealing does not help ...


2

I once heard that there was a situation in Russia years ago when things weren't so nice there, and some Jewish people were taken away to Labour Camp or whatever they used to do. There were a group of them and they didn't have a siddur and it was Shabbat Rosh Chodesh. Nobody knew the Ata Yatzarta prayer by memory but would know the regular "Tikanta Shabbat". ...


2

This is a machlokes Rishonim. It is brought in the Ran to the Rif's Hilchos Chanuka, first paragraph. The Ran first proves and then defends the opinion that it cannot be used even for mitzvah purposes, and then cites the Baal HaMe'or that you could use it for mitzvah purposes. The Ran's primary proof is that they allowed the use of inferior oils for ...


2

The Shas political party, which, until his passing in 2013, was spiritually led by R' Ovadia Yosef ammended its charter in 2010 to adpot the World Zionist Organization's New Jerusalem Program and became a member of the WZO. The New Jerusalem Program promotes: Zionism, the national liberation movement of the Jewish people, brought about the establishment ...


2

I compiled a few opinions from Hilchos Chashmal, most have to do with electric but it answers the wick and oil parts. Kochvei Yitzchak simanim 5-8 – Mikar Halacha there is no issue with electric for ner chanuka, but the best way to perform the mitzvah is with olive oil. The ones who asssur say that there is no shuir of a half hour by electric (oil can be ...


2

No, you don't need to. Furthermore, according to some poskim, you could even listen to the song in the shower. See this Q/A set by dinonline.org: The Question: Is one allowed to listen to Jewish music while showering in the bathroom? Answer: Yes, I don’t see any problem in this. The music does not have the halachah of spoken pesukim, and ...


2

What is clear to you is not so clear to me, but see Mishna Berurah siman 91 #12 Where he states the general rule to wear only clothing you would wear when talking with an important person. He adds that this is dependant on the usual behavior of the time. Another point he mentions there is not to wear the type of gloves that people would wear when traveling. ...


2

On page 227 of the link which was posted by Avrohom Yitzchok he gives a difference which seemed quite compelling to me. When it comes the beam, there is no idea to see the beam for its own sake, it is rather to be able to recognize that the boundary is there, so you see the sign, and that is good enough. Whereas with the Chanuka candle and a Sukka, you have ...


2

Kitzur Shuchan Aruch סימן סח - דין תפלת הדרך ושאר דברים שצריכין לזהר בדרך סעיף י': קְצָת נוֹהֲגִין שֶׁבִּהְיוֹתָם בַּדֶּרֶךְ וְאוֹכְלִים בְּבֵית עוֹבֵד כּוֹכָבִים, אֵין מְבָרְכִין בְּזִמּוּן, מִשּׁוּם דְּלֹא הֲוֵי קְבִיעוּת. וּמִכָּל מָקוֹם אִם קָבְעוּ עַצְמָן שָׁם לֶאֱכוֹל בְּיַחַד, אֵינוֹ נָכוֹן לְבַטֵּל הַזִּמּוּן. וְיֹאמְרוּ, הָרַחֲמָן הוּא יִשְׁלַח ...


1

The Gemara in Berachot says that Shabbat is one the names of Hashem. The Halacha also says that mentioning Hashem's Name in the bathroom [let alone speaking] is forbidden. Therefore, the Poskim bring down that mentioning Shabbat is forbidden.


1

The Netai Gavriel brings just about all there is to bring on the subject of Nitel. In 2:4 he brings two/three customs about the time of day or night it applies to. Although the custom is (perhaps more commonly) only from sunset or dusk until midnight, some (Chernobler, Belz, Bobov, Ger and Galitziyana) start from midday the day before (so that would be ...


1

This might not be a problem as the Rambam says non Jews do not create tumat ohel. (rambam tumat met 1,13) Although it is controversial in the Talmud see shut harambam (tumat met 1,13) debating whether non Jews create tumat ohel.


1

The answer is Yes and No. Part of Lebanon is Halachically Eretz Yisrael and part is not. See Shviit.com where they say The northern border of Eretz Yisroel lies somewhere in Lebanon


1

The opinion expressed by Chuck Davidson is based on a straight reading of the Shulchan Aruch (YD 268:2 & 12), which states that if a properly functioning beis din performs a conversion, the conversion is final and valid even if the convert subsequently fails to keep Torah law. On the other hand, according to most poskim, a beis din is not empowered to ...



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