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Let's sidestep the issue of praying in a mosque per se. Suppose a building is built as a church and years later is sold and converted into a municipal office building. Can I pray there? If a building was built to protect an idol, then Jews are prohibited from deriving benefit from the building. Thus there was a responsum that allowed converting a Methodist ...


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It's ok to venue shop, but you got to be machmir by deoraisas and makil by derbanans as per Avoda Zora daf zayin. This whole ask once and close your ears for life thing that has started up lately is just a by product of the recent break down in halachic process.


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In my current and previous workplaces I have been the only visibly practicing Jew, and I got (and get) questions fairly often. Now my coworkers, unlike your people on the street, aren't asking me to make a ruling for them (they're not Jews), but I think in both cases we are seen as a representative, possibly a source of authority, so people who want to know ...


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I just wanted to add to what has already been said. Hazal actually tell us when it is praiseworthy to go beyond what is required. They do this with the phrase "harei zeh meshubahh (הרי זה משובח) - Behold, [to do] this [action beyond what is technically required] is praiseworthy." Beyond instances where this is stated, as has been highlighted in the other ...


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There is a question that is similar to yours: If a drop of milk falls into a pot of meat and there is 60 times more meat than the drop then the food is mutar.The question is, is it assur to throw out the food since one is uncomfortable to eat something which milk fell into even though it is 100 percent mutar or one cant be machmir on wasting mutar food? The ...


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Rabbi Eliezer spent the latter years of his life in Cheirem because he refused to accept a "majority" opinion that disagreed with his own. In case you think that is doesn't apply to be "strict on yourself only", there's an incident in Mishnah (Brachot 1:3) about Rabbi Tarfon who endangered himself to "lie down" to say the night-time K'riyat Shema. His ...


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see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shechita under The five forbidden techniques when using a halaf (sakin) to slaughter animals the only problem that i see that is hard to avoid is (from above) חלדה Haladah (digging or burying) - The knife must be drawn over the throat so that it is visible while shechita is being performed. It must not be stabbed into ...


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No, a wire would not be a good shechita knife, because when it's cutting, it goes entirely under the neck, which is a problem of חלדה, "tunneling." חלדה is one of the five main halachos of shechita. See שמלה חדשה 24:9 et seqq for more info. To borrow an illustration of חלדה from a previous answer of mine, this is not חלדה, but if the circled area goes under ...


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Drisa is the problem that comes to mind. A sharp object that cuts by slicing when moved across the animals neck is allowed. Drisa is cutting through pressure applied in a downward force. Using a cheese cutter or the like would render the animal a niveila. Unfit to eat and Tamei.


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The earliest source that I have found is in Nehemiah. Here it is, with context: 28“The rest of the people—priests, Levites, gatekeepers, musicians, temple servants and all who separated themselves from the neighboring peoples for the sake of the Law of God, together with their wives and all their sons and daughters who are able to understand— 29all ...


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Cheating your opponent at chess (as an example) by using (without their knowledge) a software program that helps you pick the right moves would almost certainly be "G'neivat Daat" - stolen knowledge.. i.e. you are withholding the fact he is playing against a program. Similarly using such help with scrabble (words with friends) etc. would be too. This is ...


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Great question. The halakhah actually discusses the idea of having "ready-made" ssissiyyoth which are then attached to the corner of a garment. This concept is called `oseh min ha-'asui (essentially, "attempting to fulfill the misswah [of ssissith] from something already made beforehand"), and it is not permissible. The Rambam (Hilkhoth Ssissith 1:12-13) ...


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Proverbs 26:18-19 says: Like a madman who throws firebrands, arrows, and death is the man who deceives his neighbor and says, “I am only joking!” Lying in a game is like playing with a rifle. Although it is only a "game", a bullet might inadvertently come out of the rifle and kill somebody. When a person gets used to lying, even if only in a ...


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Messilat Yesharim 12:46: Truth is one of the pillars upon which the world stands (Pirkei Avot 1:18). Speaking falsehood, then, is comparable to removing the foundation of the world; and, conversely, if one is heedful of the truth it is as if he maintains the world's foundation. Our Sages of blessed memory told us (Sanhedrin 97a) of a community ...


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The Talmud (Art Scroll Yevamot volume 2 63a4) PDF of actual gemara page states: Rav's wife would aggravate him. When he would tell her, "Prepare me lentils." she would [instead] prepare chimtzei (Rashi - possibly peas) [If he said, "Prepare me] chimtzei", she would [instead] prepare lentils. (Meiri states that she would do the opposit of what he ...


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Rabbi J.B. Soloveitchik (Reshimot Shiurim, Berakhot p. 202) suggests that whether one requires a vessel for hand washing prior to bread depends on a dispute between Rambam and Ra'avad in Hilchot She'ar Avot Ha-Tum'ot 8:8. Ra'avad there extends the law of washing hands for ritual purity to all hand washing, but Rambam implies that this reason extends only to ...


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The Arukh Hashulhan discusses this issue in detail in Orah Haim 4. Your assumption is indeed correct; when clean hands are the only goal, such as when you scratch your head or the like, using a faucet or other flowing water would be fine, if not preferable to using a vessel. However, the netilah prior to eating bread and before shacharith involve other ...



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