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15

Per the Igros Moshe the bride does not have to cover her hair until the morning after the wedding. The reasoning is that so long that she retains a public presumption of virginity, she has no obligation to cover her hair.


12

This is a matter of disagreement among the poskim. Those who say this is an acceptable type of hair covering include Shiltei Giborim (Shabbos 29a in dapei haRif) and P'ri M'gadim (Eshel Avraham OC 75:5). Those who say it is unacceptable, and differentiate between a regular wig and a wig made out of a woman's own hair, include Ateres Z'keinim (OC 75:3), ...


12

Presumably standard practice is that once a woman begins treating her hair as erva, she should continue doing so. (I believe I've heard this from Rabbis Broyde or Willig.) Rabbi Moshe Feinstein does write that hair-covering while married is dat moshe, but hair-covering afterwards is dat yehudit. There is a great deal of discussion over what those terms ...


9

One source is Shabbos (64b), that is interpreted by some as allowing married women to cover their hair with only a wig in public (e.g. this is the interpretation of the Shiltei Giborim). R' Noach Chaim Tzvi Berlin disagrees and holds that this is not considered a legitimate headcovering (Atzei Arazim, Even HaEzer 21:2). Some other opinions hold that the ...


7

See this excellent post from בין דין לדין blog. To summarize, Rabbi Yosef Messas (pronounced "Mashash") (born about 100 years ago in Morocco, served as rabbi in Northen Africa and then later in Haifa) allows it in a responsum, Mayim Chaim II OC 110: הראת לדעת שהדבר תלוי במנהג, ואם כן בזמן הזה שכל נשי העולם בטלו מנהג הקודם וחזרו למנהג פשוט לגלות את ...


7

The opinion of Rabbi Moshe Feinstein -- which I've heard quoted by several prominent American Ashkenazi authorities on Laws of Nida -- is that the "modesty" required of a woman in her own home, when she's a nida, is not the full set that would apply for going out in public (e.g. hair covering). Rather, it's whatever she would normally feel comfortable ...


6

To add to Fred's answer: in Sifra (to Num. 5:18, the same verse that the Gemara cites) R. Yishmael finds support for the idea that unmarried virgins don't need to cover their hair in II Sam. 13:19, ותקח תמר אפר על ראשה, by explaining אפר as "a scarf" - i.e., we see that Tamar began covering her head with one only after she was violated. (As the commentary ...


6

A requirement for a married woman to cover her hair, whether d'oraysa or d'rabbanan, is suggested by the fact that the kohein would uncover a sotah's hair (Kesuvos 72a). Hair is additionally considered an ervah when it is customarily kept covered. Since married women must cover their hair, the sight of this normally covered area is an ervah. For single women ...


6

You say: A veil is worn, of course, but that hardly seems to be a full covering. I learned that due to the large argument about when the bride first must cover her hair, it is sufficient at the wedding to have a partial covering which satisfies the Biblical requirement (dat moshe) but not the rabbinic requirement (dat yehudit). [See the Talmud Ketubot 72b ...


6

Firstly: What makes you think that Sheitels are a recent development? See the Gemara in Sanhedrin 112a: בעי רב יוסף שיער נשים צדקניות מהו אמר רבא הא דרשעיות אסור (דברים יג) תקבץ ושרפת כתיב מי שאינו מחוסר אלא קביצה ושריפה יצא זה שמחוסר תלישה וקביצה ושריפה אלא אמר רבא בפיאה נכרית היכי דמי אי דמחובר בגופה כגופה דמיא לא צריכא דתלי בסיבטא כנכסי צדיקים שבתוכה ...


5

It depends on who you ask, and how they interpret the sources. The Mishna on Ketubot 72a list it as Das Yehudit (which the gemara contrasts with DeOraysa): מתני' ואלו יוצאות שלא בכתובה העוברת על דת משה ויהודית ואיזו היא דת משה מאכילתו שאינו מעושר ומשמשתו נדה ולא קוצה לה חלה ונודרת ואינה מקיימת ואיזוהי דת יהודית יוצאה וראשה פרוע וטווה בשוק ומדברת עם כל ...


5

The remark of the Shulchan Aruch in Even HaEzer (21:2) is based on the Rambam (Hil. Issurei Bi'ah 21:17) and seems to be ultimately derived from the gemara in K'suvos (bottom of 72a). However, in light of the statement of the Shulchan Aruch elsewhere (OC 75:2, based on the mishna in K'suvos, 2:1) that it is customary for maidens to appear in public with ...


5

This was a very hot topic several years ago when some it became known that many wigs from India have hair that comes from idol worship. For a comprehensive treatment of the subject see Rabbi Yirmiyohu Kaganoff's article "Can a Sheitel be Prohibited Because of Avodah Zarah?".


5

I'm making this a community wiki, so please fill in as you can. Are there communities that will wear synthetic but not human-hair? You'll hear plenty of rabbis saying "a sheitel is no good if it looks too attracting", but that's subjective. I'm looking for yes or no, does a wig count as covering. You'll also hear of rabbis who paskened they don't ...


5

As stated here: A man may recite a bracha in the presence of a non-Jewish married woman whose hair is uncovered (Shu”t Igros Moshe - OC 4:15:1) Much of tznius is based on context and expectations. The very fact that there is a difference between a married and unmarried Jewish woman's hair (or according to Rashi, even a married and unmarried woman's ...


5

Rabbi Michael Broyde makes this exact point. "Would we allow a woman to wear a shirt that had an image of her bare chest on it? No, because that image is inappropriate in our culture." Furthermore, if a woman would travel to some country where all the women keep their hair covered and wear a ritzy-deluxe sheitel there, she would turn a lot of heads. ...


4

This is a very (extremely?) delicate subject. We must first understand what stands behind it and this forum may not be the best place to discuss it. The idea of "tzniut" is very deep and comes to help us build a meaningful and lasting married relationship. The chinuch (training? education?) starts at a very young age much before the boy/girl gets to the age ...


4

A human hair sheitel is hair that was already detached from the natural source (a person’s head) therefore the concern of gozez because of brushing does not apply. The same halacha applies to a non-human hair sheitel. Therefore, you are allowed to use a brush with hard bristles.However, one should still use a different brush than the one used during the ...


4

Many ladies when they go to the Mikva have their hair uncovered when they make a Bracha. See also Mishna Mesechtas Chala האשה יושבת וקוצה חלתה ערומה - from the Biur it clearly seems like she takes Challa and makes a Bracha in that state. However Yabia Omer 6:15 says that a lady should have her hair covered even if in Chadrei Chadarim when saying Hashem's ...


4

Satmar frowns upon wearing a wig only. Besides for that, each woman (family, husband...) decides. In fact Satmar is one of the least uniformly dressed chassidic groups, both among men, and among women. The most common mode is a wig with something on top, like a band, a hat, or a scarf. However, some will wear a shpitzel (cloth or foam in the general shape of ...


4

The gemara in Ketubot derives the requirement from the laws of the Sotah in bamidbar 5:18. As the woman is required to UNcover her hair, there must have been covering on it. The discussion is much more complex, but you can read about it here.


4

One can ask if a person can be undressed and stand in front of their front window, but that obviously is a breach of tznius. Why should this be any different? In the laws of Shma(75:5) it says that Ervah ba'Ashashis (unclothedness in glass) is also untznius and someone else can't say Shma facing them so your case where she is wearing a transparent hair ...


3

Ovadia Yosef holds that women, married and unmarried, ideally cover their heads when they say shem u'malchut, regardless of location or others' presence. In a Yeminite shul, unmarried women will be asked to cover their heads and I have seen unmarried Yeminite women cover their heads to light and bless Chanukah candles. For those who are interested in the ...


3

As Rav Melamed notes, the Chasam Sofer argued that a woman is obligated in to cover her hair before memebers of her household, whereas Reb Moshe Feinstein held that she is not obligated to.


3

Answers from HaRav Musafi Shelit"a לכבוד הרב מוצפי שליט"א אני רוצה להתחזק בע''ה בנושא כיסוי ראש בבית כי אני לא מקפידה לישון עם כיסוי ראש ולפעמים הילדים שלי-הגדול בן 6 רואה אותי בלי כיסוי ראש לצערי אבל נורא קשה לי אני ממש מרגישה שזה מציק לי ואני אפילו סובלת מזה ומאוד לא נח לי לישון עם הכיסוי על אף שניסתי כל מיני כובעים וכיסויים, השאלה עד כמה זה חשוב ועד ...


2

Per Oz VeHadar Levusha a married gentile's uncovered hair is also considered an Ervah.


2

I remember that I read in "Darkei Tahara" of Rav Mordechai Elyahu Zatsa"l that is a h'oumra and even for people who do that, it's not necessary to put again the kissouy roch if it falls during the night. Sorry but I don't know the Ashkenazi point of view.


2

I have seen all opinions covered. I know people who will cover their hair if the blinds are open but in the house. However, they will uncover their hair if family members are around inside the house and the blinds are closed. I know of people who will always cover the hair, even when the blinds are closed, and even when alone with their husband if it is ...


2

Spitzlach may include fake hair, and may have foam, but many do not. There are basically three types, all of which are worn between the forehead and the headscarf: A hard edge covered with short strands of fake hair giving a look of hair that loops around and is tucked in under the scarf. (This should not be confused with a "fall" which is a piece ...


2

Just a broader overview on Fred's answer: many, many poskim would say that erva can be subjective and depends on society; in a society where the modest non-Jewish single women don't cover their hair, the Jewish women don't have to either. (Though Rabbi Willig's opinion is that covering the torso is required, regardless of cultural norms.) Hair covering for ...



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