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8

The mefarshim on this portion of Navi (Targum, Rashi, Radak, etc.) explain that the man who died was actually Ovadiah (see Melachim Aleph 18). He was the man who kept 100 true prophets alive during their persecution by Jezebel. He hid them in 2 caves. He also provided for all of their physical needs. The cost of secretly supporting them, not only risked ...


6

In Ashkenazi cantillation, the demarcation of the end of a recitation unit is technically no different than the end of any other verse vis a vis the cantillation marks themselves. There is therefore no strict requirement for them to be pronounced differently. However, it is a widespread custom that the concluding words of a recitation unit (whether a ...


5

According to this article at shemayisroel.co.il it is permitted for a blind person to read the Haftora from a Braille book or even by heart. The one called to the Torah for maftir must know how to recite the haftarah properly; he must therefore prepare the reading beforehand. He should read the haftarah out loud with the rest of congregation ...


4

See the bottom of p. 3 – p. 4 of this article: Avudraha”m explains that it does come from the meaning “to exempt”. At the time when the Haftarah was first instituted (some theories state that it was in effect during the period of the first Temple), Jews were prohinited from reading the Torah. Thus, reading from the prophets exempted them from reading from ...


4

Kol Dodi on the Haftaros, by Rabbi David Feinstein. According to the publisher: In this masterpiece, the Rosh Yeshivah introduces each Haftarah, explains its historical context where necessary, shows its relationship to the Parashah, and offers an enlightening commentary in his own unique, original manner.


4

Encyclopedia Yeudis says in the name of the Kalbo that there are 7 Brachos for the Haftora against the seven who had Aliyos. It says that the Brachos are mentioned in Mesechtas Sofrim 13. המפטיר מברך שבע ברכות על ההפטרה נגד שבעה העולים לס"ת (כלבו) במס' סופרים (פי"ג) נרשמו הברכות שאומרים לפני ואחרי ההפטרה (ויש שינויים בסדור רב עמרם גאון), ומסיים "בא"י ...


4

Read the Beur Halacha commentary on the same page in your link. He explicitly states that even if you make a mistake as the one you listed, the Haftarah is still the Chanukah haftarah. The reason is because of Pirsumei Nisa (proclaiming the miracle of Chanukah.) He states that even if you accidentally recited the Rosh Hodesh haftarah in error, it's fine.


3

Tosfos to Megila 21a “Hakorei” explains why the haftorah is read at Mincha. והטעם שמפטיר במנחה בתענית ולא בשחרית משום דכתיב בה שמרו משפט ועשו צדקה (ישעיה נו)ואגרא דתעניתא צדקתא לעת ערב ומש"ה נכון לאומרו בערב אחר שעשו צדקה He says that the reward of the fast-day is the charity given on that day. It could be assumed that by the time of mincha, ...


3

No. There is no Haftara commonly printed (excluding a mistaken edition, or something) that isn't used at least occasionally by some community. Note that some are used very, very rarely, which perhaps might lead someone to doubt if they are ever used.


3

As @DoubleAA says, we only read haftarot from the Prophets, not the Writings. There isn't one clear reason for this. For example, the Baer Heytev says that the reason is that you will not find a suitable matter there that fits the week's parsha, while others give other reasons. Here is an article in Hebrew about haftarot in general, which discusses this ...


2

Thanks to Double AA for narrowing it down for me. The pasuk is Amos 3:2, "Only you did I love above all the families of the earth; therefore, I will visit upon you all your iniquities [but not the gentiles]." Originally I read the Art Scroll translation and commentary, I don't have it available right now, and I think either their elucidation or ...


2

Supplementing @GershonGold's answer, see this article. There is a controversy as to whether the brachot recited before the haftarah are really 1 or 2 brachot. In response to your second question, there are a few reaons, all based on what I am inferring form the linked article. Haftarah was originally considered supplemental to the Torah reading, if you ...


2

Wikipedia explains that the name comes from the fact that during the time when one was not allowed to read from the Torah they read the Haftora instead and thus were Patur from reading the Torah. מקור קריאת ההפטרה, מובא ב"אבודרהם" (בסדר שחרית של שבת, ובלבוש ובב"ח או"ח ס' רפ"ד וב"משנה ברורה" שם) שבאחת התקופות גזרו האויבים שאסור לקרוא בתורה. וכן היא ...


2

This answer is essentially a summary of a shiur by Rav Moshe Lichtenstein שליט"א, (of Yeshivat Har Etzion) that I found (by Googling) here. Firstly, the source of this Haftara - Machar Chodesh - is from the Gemara in Megila 31a: ראש חדש שחל להיות בשבת מפטירין והיה מדי חדש בחדשו חל להיות באחד בשבת מאתמול מפטירין ויאמר לו יהונתן מחר חדש ‏ From the ...


2

I think the Hertz Chumash does a good job. Keep in mind, though, that not every Haftarah has a direct relationship to the Torah parsha or even a special occasion occurring on that day. For example, the 7 Haftarat of "Consolation" that occur between the week after Tish'a B'Av (Shabbat Nachamu) and prior to Rosh Hashanna (Netzavim or Netzavim / Vayelech) are ...


1

I checked Artscroll, Koren (a machzor, but that shouldn't matter), Sim Shalom (used by Conservative), Tehilot Hashem (nusach Ari, used by Chabad), and Gates of Prayer (older Reform siddur). All have כָּל. The OP then said in a comment that the siddur in question is Mishkan T'filah, the current Reform siddur. I just checked that and, sure enough, the ...


1

The source for reading the Haftara at Mincha on a fast day is Taanis 12b end of page. אמר אביי מצפרא עד פלגא דיומא מעיינינן במילי דמתא מכאן ואילך ריבעא דיומא קרינן בספרא ואפטרתא מכאן ואילך בעינן רחמי רש"י ריבעא דיומא קרו ויחל משה ומפטירין דרשו ה בהמצאו Abaye says that from morning to noon people are busy therefore the Haftara is read in the ...


1

The Samson Raphael Hirsch chumash set has a volume dedicated to the haftorah, many times explaining the connecting theme. In Hebrew, there is Rabbi Shimon Schwab's commentary on the chmash Maayan Beis Hasho'eva which will at times focus on the haftorah independently. Meshech Chochma, also Hebrew, will at times have insights into the haftorah as well.


1

My favorite is the commentary of R' Samson Raphael Hirsch on the haphtaros, he often connects the two. In addition, the classic Stone Chumash from ArtScroll has a note on every haphtorah, often explaining the non-obvious connections.


1

If we look at 1 Sam 30:16, we see that the Amalekim, having taken the spoils of war, feast and drink and party like there's no tomorrow. In chapter 14, we see the soldiers of Israel also acting in an unbecoming way with the spoils of war. There, Shaul pronounced a curse on any soldier who eats anything during the battle. Of course, being soldiers, they get ...



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