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5

You are certainly welcome to invite him. He can chose whether or not to come. If the food is being prepared in a non-kosher facility, really the only things that he would be able to eat without special effort are unprepared foods like raw fruits and vegetables. There are ways to make kosher food in unkosher ovens; however, that could take considerable extra ...


5

What I'd seen around the blogosphere was that it was an innovation by "Rabbi" (he was never formally ordained) Shraga Feivel Mendolowitz intended for Torah UMesorah community day schools that were open on Chol Hamoed (probably in the 1960s, I assume). Some of the students were not observant and didn't have a sukkah at home, so they'd take class trips to see ...


5

I use strands of white holiday lights like these or these (often cheap on December 26!), powered by a heavy-duty extension cord that is plugged in in the garage, with foil plastic and electrical tape around plugs that are outside (the second strand plugged into the first, etc). I've had no safety problems since starting to wrap the plugs; before I did ...


4

This year, I ran an outdoor-rated extension cord (not hard to come by) out a window (through the already-insulated gap where an air conditioner is) to the sukkah and plugged in a five-bulb lighting string, also outdoor-rated. I used yellow anti-bug CFLs, again outdoor-rated. When I've asked in Home Depot about plugging things in outside, I've gotten the ...


4

First, about Yom Kippur: A seder, and Passover, have nothing practical to do with Yom Kippur. Now to your question: There's nothing wrong with a gentile's attending a seder. Obviously, it would be tactless to bring up Jesus's last supper, or any comparison with Easter. (Moreover, it would go directly against one of the main purposes of the seder, which is ...


3

There are many degrees and styles of kashrut observance. Some people will be fine just by not mixing meat and dairy and excluding non-kosher animals. Others will politely refuse to eat anywhere that is not 100% kosher (which again, is a definition that might vary even among the most orthodox) The best way to be sure is to ask your friend what his needs ...


3

I don't know. But Rav El'azar Meir Teitz provided some data points (but the hyperlinks are mine): The comment was made that there is "a minhag amoung many chassidim to not eat anywhere except in their own house." This… was not restricted to chassidim; it was apparently the norm in Lita as well. My father z"l taught me to take nothing in another ...


3

If your sukkah is on your porch, often you have a porch light already there. Some people have an outdoors outlet and plug a light into there. Anyone have their experience with this? How waterproof/safe is this? I've tried some solar-powered-walkway-light devices, but they haven't been bright enough. This year we used a 4-D-battery, LED camping lantern. ...


2

I've been using shop lights (similar to this) for years now; two of them, each with two fluorescent bulbs, comfortably light up my 30' x 9' sukkah. I plug them into a regular power strip, which in turn is plugged into an extension cord rated for outdoor use. I used to put a plastic bag over the power strip to protect it from the rain, but didn't do so this ...


2

The Midrash Rabbah (84,2) on Bereishis teaches that all the Avos made converts to the service of Hashem: Avraham made converts, as it says in Bereishis 12,5 "And Avram took Sarai, his wife...and the souls they had acquired in Haran". These are the converts whom Avraham converted. Yaakov made converts, as it says in Bereishis 35,2 "Thereupon Jacob ...


2

It's not an invitation to your Seder. It's a reminder\quote from the times of the Beit haMikdash (Temple), inviting people to share with you the Korban Pesach (Paschal Sacrifice), and the accompanying Matzo and Marror. That's why Ha Lachma Anya concludes with a prayer that we should return to Israel, and be able to once again bring the Korban Pesach. ...


2

Rabbi Yehonasan Eybeschutz explains that "Kol Dichfin yesay veyechal..." is not to be interpreted as an invitation, but rather as a statement of fact about the Seder. It should not be translated (as you did) "let all who are hungry...," but rather, "all who are hungry...". It is simply adding another detail about the Seder, namely, that we invite poor ...


1

You are correct about the halacha about a guest contributing a perutah towards the Chanukah candles. And interesting enough there is a דעה in the גמרא (we don't paskin like this דעה) but there is a דעה in מסכת סוכה who says that a person isn't Yotzeh residing in his succah unless he owns it. So contributing to the succah would be like having a חלק of the ...


1

I do not understand your question. Why not ask why didnt Avrohom become a massive pillar in Avodah, or in Torah. Why was he so bent on Gemilas Chassodim. Let me offer my opinion. It is well known (source someone?) that Avraham, Yitzchok and Yaackov correspond to the three pillars, Chesed, Gevurah, and Tiferes. So Avraham being Middas HaChessed showed extra ...



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